Format war over. Why?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Guest, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:

    Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?

    Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    exclusively?

    Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the higher
    capacity?

    I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    it didn't happen.

    Norm Strong
     
    Guest, Feb 27, 2008
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Doug Jacobs Guest

    wrote:
    > The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:


    > Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?


    Could be. Many speculate that it was Microsoft that urged Toshiba to
    stick with HD-DVD even when they were ready to go with blu-ray way back in
    2005, which would have avoided the whole format war altogether.

    > Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    > exclusively?


    The blu-ray camp (not just Sony) paid them.

    > Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the higher
    > capacity?


    Blu-ray supports some better audio formats, but the reality is that most
    folks won't notice or even realize this.

    > I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    > to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    > lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    > guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    > it didn't happen.


    This format war wasn't decided by consumers - if it were, the war would
    still be going since most consumers had been ignoring both formats because
    they either didn't have HD, didn't care, or didn't want to get burned by
    making the "wrong" choice (ala VHS/Betamax of 20 years ago). Instead, I
    think retailers had a big say. Since blu-ray discs and players are more
    expensive, they make more money per sale than HD-DVD did, so retailers
    would favor blu-ray over HD-DVD simply for that reason - especially since
    there are no significant technological differences between the formats.

    --
    It's not broken. It's...advanced.
     
    Doug Jacobs, Feb 27, 2008
    #2
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  3. Doug Jacobs wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >>The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:

    >
    >>Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?

    >
    > Could be. Many speculate that it was Microsoft that urged Toshiba to
    > stick with HD-DVD even when they were ready to go with blu-ray way back in
    > 2005, which would have avoided the whole format war altogether.


    There's rumors that Toshiba had *already* been set to throw in the towel
    after Warner, Bill Gates be darned, and Netflix and Wal-mart had gotten
    wind of the pre-surrender ahead of time--
    Effects, rather than Cause.

    Paramount/Dreamworks, as we eventually learned, only "cho$e" HD because
    A) Toshiba promised to pay the bills on the Star Trek: Remastered disks,
    and B) had sold them a bill of goods that Warner's loyalty was "just
    around the corner", and Paramount had been rather disgruntled to find
    out it wasn't.
    ....Still, they believed that Toshiba believed it.
    (<makes "coo-coo" ear-circle>)

    (And in latest articles about Dreamworks not giving in yet, evidently
    Jeffrey Katzenberg STILL can't shut his big fat stool-pigeon mouth about
    the bribes:
    http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssConsumerGoodsAndRetailNews/idUSN2651290220080227
    )

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Feb 27, 2008
    #3
  4. wrote:

    > The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    > Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?


    No, Toshiba had their heart broken over Warner:

    After going dual, Warner had been playing hard-to-get about studio
    loyalty, since they had so much of their future cash invested in their
    abortive dual-format technology, without blabbing too much about their
    patents to the rest of the industry--
    Toshiba had certainly been throwing money their way, and bragged to all
    the other studios in the locker room, like Paramount and Dreamworks,
    that "Yeah, they dig us"...But Warner played it cagey, and Toshiba, like
    the proverbial high-school geek one week before the prom, was naive
    enough to think that No Meant Maybe, especially if it didn't *happen* to
    sound like "no".

    They didn't even happen to notice Warner and New Line execs complaining
    *loudly* about those Dual-Factory Blues, and when Warner went out with
    Blu...Toshiba, you been DUMPED.
    And everything that the Dream Had Built went with it. -_-

    > Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    > exclusively?


    Disney chose Blu because of Apple, and Sony chose Blu because of Sony,
    but they made it look good. :)

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Feb 27, 2008
    #4
  5. Guest

    Phisherman Guest

    On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:53:50 -0800, <> wrote:

    >The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    >Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?
    >
    >Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    >exclusively?
    >
    >Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the higher
    >capacity?


    Capacity is a BIG factor. Media has typically moved to higher
    capacity. What about the cost per GB?

    >I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    >to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    >lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    >guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    >it didn't happen.
    >
    >Norm Strong
    >


    I really don't think "Blu-ray" has won at all. There are so few
    titles available in Blu-ray compared to regular DVD. Lower the cost
    of Blu-ray to just a shade above regular DVD and chances are good it
    will become a standard.
     
    Phisherman, Feb 27, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    bob from oz Guest

    wrote:
    > The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    > Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?


    yes, they agreed on the grassy knoll.

    --
    Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside a dog, it's too
    dark to read. - Groucho Marx
     
    bob from oz, Feb 28, 2008
    #6
  7. Guest

    Guest

    On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:53:50 -0800, <> wrote:

    >The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    >Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?
    >
    >Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    >exclusively?
    >
    >Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the higher
    >capacity?
    >
    >I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    >to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    >lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    >guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    >it didn't happen.
    >
    >Norm Strong
    >


    Just a thought. Why didn't they make players that could use both
    types? I know the Beta tapes of years ago were a different physical
    size, but all DVDs are the same diameter.

    I dont know the technical aspects of all of this, or for that matter
    why they even developed two types, but I'd think that they could
    incorporate both with the flip of a switch?????
    It would seem to me that they just wanted to make more money by
    selling the hd-dvd stuff and then making it useless.

    In some ways, I cant even figure why they need any DVDs of the HD
    type. Plain DVDs seem to work just fine for me, but then I just have
    a standard tv and never saw a need for anything more. When they come
    way down in price, I may consder both the HDTV and the DVD setup, but
    at the prices they charge now, I would not even consider it. After
    all, it's just a two hour movie, and then normal life carries on......
    This makes me wonder what percentage of people even own the HD types.
    It would seem to me it would only be a very small percentage of people
    who take their tv watching really seriously.

    Jerry
     
    , Feb 28, 2008
    #7
  8. Guest

    Telstar Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:53:50 -0800, <> wrote:
    >
    >>The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >>
    >>Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?
    >>
    >>Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    >>exclusively?
    >>
    >>Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the
    >>higher
    >>capacity?
    >>
    >>I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    >>to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    >>lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    >>guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    >>it didn't happen.
    >>
    >>Norm Strong
    >>

    >
    > Just a thought. Why didn't they make players that could use both
    > types? I know the Beta tapes of years ago were a different physical
    > size, but all DVDs are the same diameter.
    >
    > I dont know the technical aspects of all of this, or for that matter
    > why they even developed two types, but I'd think that they could
    > incorporate both with the flip of a switch?????
    > It would seem to me that they just wanted to make more money by
    > selling the hd-dvd stuff and then making it useless.
    >
    > In some ways, I cant even figure why they need any DVDs of the HD
    > type. Plain DVDs seem to work just fine for me, but then I just have
    > a standard tv and never saw a need for anything more. When they come
    > way down in price, I may consder both the HDTV and the DVD setup, but
    > at the prices they charge now, I would not even consider it. After
    > all, it's just a two hour movie, and then normal life carries on......
    > This makes me wonder what percentage of people even own the HD types.
    > It would seem to me it would only be a very small percentage of people
    > who take their tv watching really seriously.
    >
    > Jerry


    There are players that play both types. They cost more than two single
    players......
     
    Telstar, Feb 28, 2008
    #8
  9. Guest

    Impmon Guest

    On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 20:57:41 -0000, Doug Jacobs
    <> wrote:

    >This format war wasn't decided by consumers - if it were, the war would
    >still be going since most consumers had been ignoring both formats because
    >they either didn't have HD, didn't care, or didn't want to get burned by
    >making the "wrong" choice (ala VHS/Betamax of 20 years ago). Instead, I
    >think retailers had a big say. Since blu-ray discs and players are more
    >expensive, they make more money per sale than HD-DVD did, so retailers
    >would favor blu-ray over HD-DVD simply for that reason - especially since
    >there are no significant technological differences between the formats.


    Since Blu-ray is now the dominate format, wouldn't that mean more
    players and movies would start coming out and flood the market,
    driving the price down?

    I'm not going to jump the bandwagon just yet, sticking with my 20 year
    old CED player.
     
    Impmon, Feb 28, 2008
    #9
  10. <> wrote:

    > The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    > Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?


    Highly unlikely, but that doesn't stop the conspiracy theorists.


    > Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    > exclusively?


    They didn't until Warner Home Entertainment, the biggest disc
    distributor, went Blu-ray exclusive in early January. The studios didn't
    really care which format won, or even if there were two formats so long
    as it didn't hurt disc sales. But it looked like the format war was
    hurting sales, so the studios started trying to tip the balance and end
    the war by going exclusive. And that's exactly what happened when Warner
    went Blu.


    > Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the higher
    > capacity?


    A higher transfer rate than HD DVD. Not important for watching video,
    but of some significance, along with capacity, for a next-generation
    data storage format. That's why most of the computer industry backed
    Blu-ray early on.


    > I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    > to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    > lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    > guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    > it didn't happen.


    At the retail level, HD DVD's lower costs showed up only in the prices
    of players, which most observers believe Toshiba was selling below cost.
    Consumers have become used to rapidly falling hardware prices for new
    technology, and the typical DVD user spends as much on disc purchases
    and rentals in a single year as he spent on his player, whatever its
    price. So to consumers, player prices aren't as important as discs --
    how much they cost, how long their format will be around, and what
    content is available on them. The first was a draw, as was the second
    for the duration of the format war. The third was in the control of the
    studios.

    Despite Toshiba's aggressive price cutting in 2007, only a pitifully
    small number of stand-alone HD DVD players had been sold by the end of
    the year, mostly in North America. (The rest of the world preferred
    Blu-ray, although sales of stand-alone BD players were also pretty
    feeble.) In worldwide disc sales, Blu-ray outsold HD DVD by about two to
    one in 2007, even during Toshiba's last quarter player price offensive
    -- something that now looks like the format war's Battle of the Bulge.
    For titles, like Warner's, available in both formats, the Blu-ray
    usually outsold the HD DVD version by a comfortable margin. Cheaper HD
    DVD hardware was not helping HD DVD disc sales. It was those disc sales
    figures, not some mythical secret payment from Sony, that induced Warner
    to go Blu.
     
    Neill Massello, Feb 29, 2008
    #10
  11. On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 16:34:49 GMT, Impmon <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 20:57:41 -0000, Doug Jacobs
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>This format war wasn't decided by consumers - if it were, the war would
    >>still be going since most consumers had been ignoring both formats because
    >>they either didn't have HD, didn't care, or didn't want to get burned by
    >>making the "wrong" choice (ala VHS/Betamax of 20 years ago). Instead, I
    >>think retailers had a big say. Since blu-ray discs and players are more
    >>expensive, they make more money per sale than HD-DVD did, so retailers
    >>would favor blu-ray over HD-DVD simply for that reason - especially since
    >>there are no significant technological differences between the formats.

    >
    >Since Blu-ray is now the dominate format, wouldn't that mean more
    >players and movies would start coming out and flood the market,
    >driving the price down?
    >
    >I'm not going to jump the bandwagon just yet, sticking with my 20 year
    >old CED player.


    CED?! HAhahahahaha... So what? You got like TEN titles!
    Hahahahahahahahaha! Sure bub.

    Yeah... just checked. A whole 1700 titles. Oh boy!

    So my HD DVDs are such a bad collection after all.

    I am going to buy another HD A35 player to put in the closet until my
    current unit finally dies. Cheap insurance, and I won't be forced to
    watch a film via a PC.
     
    StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt, Feb 29, 2008
    #11
  12. StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt wrote:

    >
    > Yeah... just checked. A whole 1700 titles. Oh boy!
    >
    > So my HD DVDs are such a bad collection after all.


    Well, sure, there's all of this spring and summer's new Paramount HD
    titles still set to go, like the Indy trilogy, the Jack Ryan set,
    Sweeney Todd, Bee Movie, Kite Runner, There Will Be Blood...

    ....Oh, wait, sorry: Paramount just cancelled them today. ^_^

    Derek Janssen (and is "considering" upcoming Blu releases)
     
    Derek Janssen, Feb 29, 2008
    #12
  13. On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 17:59:09 -0700, (Neill
    Massello) wrote:

    >A higher transfer rate than HD DVD. Not important for watching video,
    >but of some significance, along with capacity, for a next-generation
    >data storage format. That's why most of the computer industry backed
    >Blu-ray early on.



    I'll bet they did. The ability to foist a drive on us for hundreds of
    dollars more than it is worth, and authoring media that is an order of
    magnitude more than it should be.

    Just like a landlord raising the rent to suck more cash, that's how
    they backed it.

    We should boycott the format and make it fail as well, then WE can TELL
    THEM what WE want.

    Then, Toshiba and everyone else will build it, we will buy it, and Sony
    can take the sock in the jaw this time. They certainly deserve it.
     
    StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt, Feb 29, 2008
    #13
  14. On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 02:38:22 GMT, Derek Janssen
    <> wrote:

    >StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Yeah... just checked. A whole 1700 titles. Oh boy!
    >>
    >> So my HD DVDs are such a bad collection after all.

    >
    >Well, sure, there's all of this spring and summer's new Paramount HD
    >titles still set to go, like the Indy trilogy, the Jack Ryan set,
    >Sweeney Todd, Bee Movie, Kite Runner, There Will Be Blood...
    >
    >...Oh, wait, sorry: Paramount just cancelled them today. ^_^
    >
    >Derek Janssen (and is "considering" upcoming Blu releases)
    >



    The only HD DVD releases we will be seeing are any that have already
    been pressed.
     
    StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt, Feb 29, 2008
    #14
  15. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    > Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?


    Possibly - would not be surprised, but it is more likely that Sony just
    convinced ( by whatever means) the studios to release in their format only

    > Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    > exclusively?
    >
    > Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the
    > higher capacity?
    >


    To answer both, I understand that the capabilities of blu-ray players can be
    controlled by the technology owner, to the benefit of the studios (who
    through Sony are the same people)
    In effect, blu-ray players can supposidly be made to reject any content not
    produced by Sony authorized authoring programs in Sony authorized formats. I
    think they expected to eliminate ( hah) movie piracy, but it looks like they
    have also eliminated the opportunity for ordinay people to produce their own
    HD content for free distribution. (ie home movies).

    The race to create 'uncrackable' dvd encryption, and the success of copying
    programs to bypass these has likely caused a re-thinking of 'security'.


    > I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    > to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    > lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    > guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    > it didn't happen.
    >


    I believe hd-dvd is a better format for the home movie maker, but that is
    not where the money is. The big bucks come from making the studio movies and
    other copyright material into some kind of 'read only' format.

    Also, this sounds a lot like the MS philosophy of some years ago - "its
    easier to win when you have killed the competition"
    Expect blu-ray prices to stay high for a long time, as Sony recovers all the
    R&D costs.

    I am contemplating getting a big screen tv, but only for hd broadcast
    programming. I don't want to sink hundreds of dollars into a player for hi
    def movies. It just is not worth the cost, for the slight added enjoyment of
    seeing a clearer picture.

    Stuart
     
    Stuart Miller, Feb 29, 2008
    #15
  16. StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt <> wrote:

    > The only HD DVD releases we will be seeing are any that have already
    > been pressed.


    Probably true. There won't be enough demand for HD DVD discs to justify
    keeping a production line going for them.
     
    Neill Massello, Feb 29, 2008
    #16
  17. StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt <> wrote:

    > We should boycott the format and make it fail as well, then WE can TELL
    > THEM what WE want.
    >
    > Then, Toshiba and everyone else will build it, we will buy it, and Sony
    > can take the sock in the jaw this time. They certainly deserve it.


    Until then, try pacifying yourself by sticking pins in voodoo dolls.
     
    Neill Massello, Feb 29, 2008
    #17
  18. Guest

    Bill's News Guest

    "Telstar" <> wrote in
    news:fq5j3m$hdd$:

    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:53:50 -0800,
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in
    >>>my mind:
    >>>
    >>>Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't
    >>>know about?
    >>>
    >>>Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray,
    >>>and do so exclusively?
    >>>
    >>>Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other
    >>>than the higher
    >>>capacity?
    >>>
    >>>I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future,
    >>>but it appeared to me, based solely on public information,
    >>>that HD-DVD was definitely a lower cost system, and entirely
    >>>adequate as a movie carrier. I would have guessed that
    >>>technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    >>>it didn't happen.
    >>>
    >>>Norm Strong
    >>>

    >>
    >> Just a thought. Why didn't they make players that could use
    >> both types? I know the Beta tapes of years ago were a
    >> different physical size, but all DVDs are the same diameter.
    >>
    >> I dont know the technical aspects of all of this, or for that
    >> matter why they even developed two types, but I'd think that
    >> they could incorporate both with the flip of a switch?????
    >> It would seem to me that they just wanted to make more money
    >> by selling the hd-dvd stuff and then making it useless.
    >>
    >> In some ways, I cant even figure why they need any DVDs of
    >> the HD type. Plain DVDs seem to work just fine for me, but
    >> then I just have a standard tv and never saw a need for
    >> anything more. When they come way down in price, I may
    >> consder both the HDTV and the DVD setup, but at the prices
    >> they charge now, I would not even consider it. After all,
    >> it's just a two hour movie, and then normal life carries
    >> on...... This makes me wonder what percentage of people even
    >> own the HD types. It would seem to me it would only be a very
    >> small percentage of people who take their tv watching really
    >> seriously.
    >>
    >> Jerry

    >
    > There are players that play both types. They cost more than
    > two single players......
    >
    >
    >


    And those that cost less than either. The HG HD/BD player (GGC
    H20N) was under US$300 months ago including PowerDVD player
    software which handles BD and HD formats along with several other
    popular formats including HDTV captures.
     
    Bill's News, Feb 29, 2008
    #18
  19. Guest

    OpaPiloot Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in my mind:
    >
    > Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't know about?
    >
    > Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray, and do so
    > exclusively?
    >
    > Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other than the higher
    > capacity?
    >
    > I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future, but it appeared
    > to me, based solely on public information, that HD-DVD was definitely a
    > lower cost system, and entirely adequate as a movie carrier. I would have
    > guessed that technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    > it didn't happen.
    >
    > Norm Strong


    Maybe you missed the trend that distributing content is moving rapidly
    to the internet. After vinyl, casette tapes became obsloete because of
    the CD, HD DVD maybe the first victim because investors see the risc of
    the competing internet. Blu-ray would be in the same position if there
    were no PS3 owners. However, when the cable networks switch to optic,
    CD's, DVD's Blu Ray and even old fashioned broadcasting will cease to
    exist because eventually high speed cable networks will be used for
    internet only.
    The world becomes smaller and smaller.

    --
    Have fun, Bert
     
    OpaPiloot, Feb 29, 2008
    #19
  20. Guest

    Telstar Guest

    "Bill's News" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9A539E18AE606billsnewspcmagicnet@66.250.146.128...
    > "Telstar" <> wrote in
    > news:fq5j3m$hdd$:
    >
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:53:50 -0800,
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>The sudden capitulation of Toshiba leaves many questions in
    >>>>my mind:
    >>>>
    >>>>Was there an agreement between Sony and Toshiba that we don't
    >>>>know about?
    >>>>
    >>>>Why did the preponderance of movie studios choose Blu-Ray,
    >>>>and do so exclusively?
    >>>>
    >>>>Technically speaking, is there some Blu-Ray advantage other
    >>>>than the higher
    >>>>capacity?
    >>>>
    >>>>I don't expect to buy into HD any time in the near future,
    >>>>but it appeared to me, based solely on public information,
    >>>>that HD-DVD was definitely a lower cost system, and entirely
    >>>>adequate as a movie carrier. I would have guessed that
    >>>>technical advantages would lead to a victory by HD-DVD. Yet,
    >>>>it didn't happen.
    >>>>
    >>>>Norm Strong
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Just a thought. Why didn't they make players that could use
    >>> both types? I know the Beta tapes of years ago were a
    >>> different physical size, but all DVDs are the same diameter.
    >>>
    >>> I dont know the technical aspects of all of this, or for that
    >>> matter why they even developed two types, but I'd think that
    >>> they could incorporate both with the flip of a switch?????
    >>> It would seem to me that they just wanted to make more money
    >>> by selling the hd-dvd stuff and then making it useless.
    >>>
    >>> In some ways, I cant even figure why they need any DVDs of
    >>> the HD type. Plain DVDs seem to work just fine for me, but
    >>> then I just have a standard tv and never saw a need for
    >>> anything more. When they come way down in price, I may
    >>> consder both the HDTV and the DVD setup, but at the prices
    >>> they charge now, I would not even consider it. After all,
    >>> it's just a two hour movie, and then normal life carries
    >>> on...... This makes me wonder what percentage of people even
    >>> own the HD types. It would seem to me it would only be a very
    >>> small percentage of people who take their tv watching really
    >>> seriously.
    >>>
    >>> Jerry

    >>
    >> There are players that play both types. They cost more than
    >> two single players......
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > And those that cost less than either. The HG HD/BD player (GGC
    > H20N) was under US$300 months ago including PowerDVD player
    > software which handles BD and HD formats along with several other
    > popular formats including HDTV captures.


    I was not clear: Stand alone players.
     
    Telstar, Mar 1, 2008
    #20
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