Format laptop with Win 7?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Joe J., Dec 13, 2009.

  1. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    I bought a new laptop with Windows 7 installed and am returning it because
    I'm not happy with the battery life. Anyway, I'm trying to re-format the
    hard drive to erase everything that I transferred there. I'm booting up
    using the restore cd and can get to the dos prompt. I enter format c: and
    then it prompts me for the volume label. I've tried C C: (C) and (C:).
    Help please.

    Yes, I know formatting still could leave data to be read with the right
    software but I'm on a deadline to return it.
     
    Joe J., Dec 13, 2009
    #1
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  2. Joe J.

    - Bobb - Guest

    If format fails, boot CD and elect to RESTORE to Factory setting
    ( depending on model will reformat/reimage drive)

    for a label ( name) just enter WINDOWS7 or hit enter for no label.
    NOT a Drive Letter ( the : is why it keeps prompting - no punctuation
    allowed)

    Did they OK to reformat ?
    ( if they get it without windows may be an issue ?)
    Surprised that ' format C:' IS an option from restore prompt


    "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:hg1ipq$aj2$-september.org...
    >I bought a new laptop with Windows 7 installed and am returning it because
    >I'm not happy with the battery life. Anyway, I'm trying to re-format the
    >hard drive to erase everything that I transferred there. I'm booting up
    >using the restore cd and can get to the dos prompt. I enter format c: and
    >then it prompts me for the volume label. I've tried C C: (C) and (C:).
    >Help please.
    >
    > Yes, I know formatting still could leave data to be read with the right
    > software but I'm on a deadline to return it.
    >
     
    - Bobb -, Dec 13, 2009
    #2
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  3. "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:hg1ipq$aj2$-september.org...
    >I bought a new laptop with Windows 7 installed and am returning it because
    >I'm not happy with the battery life. Anyway, I'm trying to re-format the
    >hard drive to erase everything that I transferred there. I'm booting up
    >using the restore cd and can get to the dos prompt. I enter format c: and
    >then it prompts me for the volume label. I've tried C C: (C) and (C:).
    >Help please.
    >
    > Yes, I know formatting still could leave data to be read with the right
    > software but I'm on a deadline to return it.
    >



    Nobody cares what's on your machine. They have to process n-number of
    machines per day, and they don't have the time or energy to look at your
    stuff. Delete your files and send the machine back.

    They are gonna wipe the drive and reinstall Win7.

    Reinstall from the Restore Disk.

    I have a Wipe Disk that will destroy the contents of your HDD to DoD
    specifications.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Dec 13, 2009
    #3
  4. Joe J.

    Paul Guest

    Joe J. wrote:
    > I bought a new laptop with Windows 7 installed and am returning it because
    > I'm not happy with the battery life. Anyway, I'm trying to re-format the
    > hard drive to erase everything that I transferred there. I'm booting up
    > using the restore cd and can get to the dos prompt. I enter format c: and
    > then it prompts me for the volume label. I've tried C C: (C) and (C:).
    > Help please.
    >
    > Yes, I know formatting still could leave data to be read with the right
    > software but I'm on a deadline to return it.
    >


    Erasing with DBAN, might erase everything, including the
    restoration partition. If you want to be certain you got
    it all, this'll do it.

    http://www.dban.org/

    When you're booted in Windows 7, some of the files will be busy. The
    OS wouldn't particularly like it, if you erased the C: that the system
    was running from. In some cases, it wouldn't grant permission to do
    so. DBAN gets around that, because you boot the computer with DBAN
    and then the entire hard drive is fair game for erasure. Windows 7 isn't
    running, when you're booted from DBAN.

    I have also used a Linux LiveCD, where the "dd" (disk dump) command gives the
    necessary tools. For example, say I determine that in Linux,
    /dev/hda1 is the equivalent of the Windows C: partition. This
    will wipe *everything* on C:. You won't be able to boot Win7
    after this... On my computer, it might take 20 minutes for this
    to finish.

    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda1

    If I instead did the following, this command syntax wipes the entire disk.
    This is equivalent to using DBAN for erasure. A device without a partition
    number, means do it to the whole drive.

    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda

    The partitions have numbers. They might be hda1, hda2, hda3, if the hard
    drive was sliced up into three pieces. If I zero "hda1", that might be the
    C: drive. If I zero "hda3", the recovery partition might be hidden in there.

    So what technique you use, depends on whether you have high speed Internet
    for download. It won't take long to do DBAN, and even dialup is enough
    to download the DBAN code (the shop that sold you the laptop, is going
    to have to repair the fact there is no longer software on the hard drive).
    Linux takes longer. A typical Linux CD might be 700MB, and fill the entire CD.
    That might take me an hour on my ISP's service.

    http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/knoppix62.html

    (Mirrors)
    http://www.knopper.net/knoppix-mirrors/

    (ISO9660 file)
    ftp://mirror.switch.ch/mirror/knoppix/

    KNOPPIX_V6.2CD-2009-11-18-EN.iso 707578 KB 11/18/2009 4:23:00 AM

    You need a program that can parse a ISO9660 file, and prepare a bootable
    CD based on it. You don't "copy" the file to the CD directly. The
    ISO9660 file has an internal format, with instructions on making
    a boot CD. I use Nero to burn the CD. There are free burner tools
    that also know how to do this (handle an ISO). When you boot from the CD,
    it isn't supposed to write to the disk (until you issue a command
    to do so). I use the Linux CD, when I need to do simple maintenance
    tasks on my Windows computer. It is great for avoiding "permission denied"
    type problems. But is no replacement for the Windows Recovery Console
    and its "fixmbr", "fixboot", "chkdsk" - some things are still best
    done using Microsoft CDs.

    Another platform that might be good for this, would be GParted. It would
    allow you to see how many partitions are on the hard drive for example.
    I typically use the Linux "fdisk" command (same name as a popular command
    in the Windows world), to do some of the things this software does for
    you.

    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/screenshots.php

    If you just want to determine how many partitions the hard drive has, this
    one is handy. You can run this from Windows 7 right now, and determine how
    many primary partitions are on the hard drive. This tool will give you
    a quick idea, how the hard drive is set up.

    ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/PTEDIT32.zip

    (Screenshot - showing three partitions on a Dell hard drive. Partition 2 has
    the OS on it, based on size, and based on partition type 07 = NTFS. If I was
    returning this computer to the store, I'd be erasing hda2, the second partition,
    followed by a "factory recovery" to put a clean OS image back on hda2.)

    http://www.vistax64.com/attachments...n-partiton-recovery-dell-xps-420-dell-tbl.gif

    *******

    DBAN will get the job done, even if it means the retailer is going to need to
    do additional work to make the laptop "factory" again. Have fun :)

    Since DBAN would remove the recovery partition, that is why
    the retailer will have more work to do. They'll need the
    recovery DVD to fix it, since *nothing* will be left on
    the hard drive. You won't be able to boot from the hard
    drive again, until the recovery DVD is available for usage.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Dec 13, 2009
    #4
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