Forgot What You Searched For? Google Didn't...

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Imhotep, Jan 21, 2006.

  1. Imhotep

    Imhotep Guest

    The Justice Department may have done us all a big favor by issuing subpoenas
    to Internet search engines to find out what people are researching online.

    Not because that data could help shield children from online porn, which was
    the government's stated goal in demanding data from Google and three other
    search firms.

    Google refused to turn over search data, partly to avoid creating the
    perception that it would hand over more personal records if asked.
    Google refused to turn over search data, partly to avoid creating the
    perception that it would hand over more personal records if asked. (By Clay
    Mclachlan -- Reuters)

    Rather, the request -- and Google's refusal to fork over its search data --
    is putting a helpful public spotlight on the vast amount of personal
    information being stored, parsed and who knows what else by the Web
    services we increasingly rely on to manage our lives.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/20/AR2006012001799.html

    Imhotep
     
    Imhotep, Jan 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. Imhotep

    Duck Guest

    Imhotep wrote:

    > The Justice Department may have done us all a big favor by issuing subpoenas
    > to Internet search engines to find out what people are researching online.

    ....

    Anybody think that Vista won't have gov't snoopware built in?
     
    Duck, Jan 21, 2006
    #2
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  3. Imhotep

    Donnie Guest

    "Duck" <> wrote in message
    news:dqskln$p5u$...
    > Imhotep wrote:
    >
    > > The Justice Department may have done us all a big favor by issuing

    subpoenas
    > > to Internet search engines to find out what people are researching

    online.
    > ...
    >
    > Anybody think that Vista won't have gov't snoopware built in?

    ##################################
    I'm sure it could and Norton and other so called security programs never
    alerted their users to what I call "proprietary trojans"
    For example, in the windows 9x days, I found a trojan in windows that made
    an FTP connection to encompass.com. It came with a new PC, iirc compaq. I
    called encompass and spoke to a guy named Steve Linowes who gave me the run
    around. I made many posts about it and noone seemed interested. Companies
    like Norton would never alert you to a MS trojan. Both companies support
    the ruling class. No matter where I go or what I do, I assume that someone
    is watching or cameras are rolling. It's no different on the net.
    donnie.
     
    Donnie, Jan 22, 2006
    #3
  4. Imhotep

    Winged Guest

    Donnie wrote:
    > "Duck" <> wrote in message
    > news:dqskln$p5u$...
    >
    >>Imhotep wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>The Justice Department may have done us all a big favor by issuing

    >
    > subpoenas
    >
    >>>to Internet search engines to find out what people are researching

    >
    > online.
    >
    >>...
    >>
    >>Anybody think that Vista won't have gov't snoopware built in?

    >
    > ##################################
    > I'm sure it could and Norton and other so called security programs never
    > alerted their users to what I call "proprietary trojans"
    > For example, in the windows 9x days, I found a trojan in windows that made
    > an FTP connection to encompass.com. It came with a new PC, iirc compaq. I
    > called encompass and spoke to a guy named Steve Linowes who gave me the run
    > around. I made many posts about it and noone seemed interested. Companies
    > like Norton would never alert you to a MS trojan. Both companies support
    > the ruling class. No matter where I go or what I do, I assume that someone
    > is watching or cameras are rolling. It's no different on the net.
    > donnie.
    >
    >

    "Trust no one" is a good model especially in the computing world. HP,
    gateway, Dell, and Compaq all have preloaded spyware/Trojan programs
    depending on ones definition. Often hidden as remote help "features".

    Winged
     
    Winged, Jan 22, 2006
    #4
  5. Imhotep

    Winged Guest

    Olive wrote:
    > I laughed when I read that washington post newspaper reported that
    > google refused to turn over search records. Google was founded by a
    > former spook and the washington post has former spooks as news
    > reporters.

    Wonders which founder you refer too. Since I am familiar with many
    spooks, I find you outlandish statement a bit tough to chew. Of course
    if either Larry Page or Sergey Brinn were spooks, I prolly wouldn't
    know. They must have been real good spooks since Sergery is Russian
    born, (uncommon in spook world), and how Larry found the time////
    Looking at time lines they must be good!...LOL it's a good cover up..
    grin..LOL

    Winged
     
    Winged, Jan 22, 2006
    #5
  6. Imhotep

    Olive Guest

    I laughed when I read that washington post newspaper reported that
    google refused to turn over search records. Google was founded by a
    former spook and the washington post has former spooks as news
    reporters.
     
    Olive, Jan 22, 2006
    #6
  7. Winged wrote:

    > Olive wrote:
    >> I laughed when I read that washington post newspaper reported that
    >> google refused to turn over search records. Google was founded by a
    >> former spook and the washington post has former spooks as news
    >> reporters.

    > Wonders which founder you refer too. Since I am familiar with many
    > spooks,


    ROTFL!

    Sure kid, and you have this bridge for sale...
     
    Borked Pseudo Mailed, Jan 22, 2006
    #7
  8. Imhotep

    Edw. Peach Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 20:21:59 -0600, Winged <>
    wrote:


    >"Trust no one" is a good model especially in the computing world. HP,
    >gateway, Dell, and Compaq all have preloaded spyware/Trojan programs
    >depending on ones definition. Often hidden as remote help "features".


    Not sure if this is relevant but during the prez election last year, I
    found a list of who was contributing heavily to the Red party. Dell
    was sending the Bush gang 80% of their campaign contributions. I
    guess the way it works is if you send them enough money, you can not
    only have laws written in your favor, but if you're really big, you
    can even write the laws. In any event, I bet Dell would cooperate
    with the King George in anything he wants to do.
     
    Edw. Peach, Jan 22, 2006
    #8
  9. Imhotep

    Donnie Guest

    Anybody think that Vista won't have gov't snoopware built in?
    > >
    > > ##################################
    > > I'm sure it could and Norton and other so called security programs never
    > > alerted their users to what I call "proprietary trojans"
    > > For example, in the windows 9x days, I found a trojan in windows that

    made
    > > an FTP connection to encompass.com. It came with a new PC, iirc compaq.

    I
    > > called encompass and spoke to a guy named Steve Linowes who gave me the

    run
    > > around. I made many posts about it and noone seemed interested.

    Companies
    > > like Norton would never alert you to a MS trojan. Both companies

    support
    > > the ruling class. No matter where I go or what I do, I assume that

    someone
    > > is watching or cameras are rolling. It's no different on the net.
    > > donnie.
    > >
    > >

    > "Trust no one" is a good model especially in the computing world. HP,
    > gateway, Dell, and Compaq all have preloaded spyware/Trojan programs
    > depending on ones definition. Often hidden as remote help "features".
    >
    > Winged

    ##############################################
    That's why when people ask me what kind of computer to get, I say a clone.
    I know a guy who builds clone laptops as well as towers. I never bothered
    to go that far.
    donnie
     
    Donnie, Jan 23, 2006
    #9
  10. Imhotep

    Olive Guest

    I stand corrected. I was wrong. Thanks. Let me rephrase.

    Maybe you two can clear up a mystery. I must have assumed this guy
    from Google company I heard do an interview was one of the founding
    group of people leading Google. Long time ago about the time Google
    became #1 search engine I heard an interview. I knew nothing at all
    about Google company personnel. This guy in the interview was
    speaking very authoritatively about Google. He was using phrases akin
    to where he'd like to take the company and how Google should do this
    and that to improve cash flow (I'm going from memory here) and these
    are his plans for future growth and so forth. This guy was so
    informed and articulate I wrongly assumed he was a founder or one of
    the group.
    Then he said that he formerly worked for an information gathering
    group. He said this group has made public its needs for certain
    information work to be done and it was contracting some of it out and
    also hiring additional employees. He said these contracts represent
    business opportunities for Google. I'm not saying such contract work
    is bad. It's just that since then it has been reported that Google
    has positioned itself to work closely with information gathering
    groups presumably via these contracts. Again this is not a bad thing.
    What I found hilarious, ironic, and incredible was the report that a
    big time newspaper which reportedly employed a few former information
    gathers, would report that Google which reportedly employed at least
    one former information gatherer, would balk at giving up its
    information to information gatherers.
     
    Olive, Jan 23, 2006
    #10
  11. Imhotep

    Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 01:08:00 -0500, Imhotep <> spewed:
    >The Justice Department may have done us all a big favor by issuing subpoenas
    >to Internet search engines to find out what people are researching online.
    >
    >Not because that data could help shield children from online porn, which was
    >the government's stated goal in demanding data from Google and three other
    >search firms.
    >
    >Google refused to turn over search data, partly to avoid creating the
    >perception that it would hand over more personal records if asked.
    >Google refused to turn over search data, partly to avoid creating the
    >perception that it would hand over more personal records if asked. (By Clay
    >Mclachlan -- Reuters)
    >
    >Rather, the request -- and Google's refusal to fork over its search data --
    >is putting a helpful public spotlight on the vast amount of personal
    >information being stored, parsed and who knows what else by the Web
    >services we increasingly rely on to manage our lives.
    >
    >http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/20/AR2006012001799.html
    >
    >Imhotep


    I agree WHOLEHEARTEDLY!
    People need to wake the hell up, and stop foolishly thinking it's all ok
    in the name of the "war on terror".

    --
    _____________________________________________________
    For email response, or CC, please email .
    Yeah, it's really a real address :)
     
    , Mar 26, 2006
    #11
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