Force a program to use physical memory.

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by typingcat@gmail.com, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. Guest

    There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    applications.
     
    , Jul 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. What program?

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    > Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    > minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    > noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    > because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    > hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    > Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    > memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    > I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    > applications.
    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 31, 2006
    #2
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  3. mikeyhsd Guest

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    <> wrote in message news:...
    There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    applications.
     
    mikeyhsd, Jul 31, 2006
    #3
  4. You can do some tuning of the Virtual Memory resources - in the Advanced tab
    of the System Properties dialog there is a Performance Options button -
    there you can optimize for foreground or background activity - the default
    is to set it to foreground, so if you have a good supply of RAM you might
    try and set it to background and see if it helps any?

    I doubt it that you'll see a significant difference, but it may come back to
    life again a bit more willingly.

    I don't know of any way to direct this kind of service to a specific
    application.

    Tony. . .


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    > Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    > minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    > noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    > because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    > hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    > Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    > memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    > I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    > applications.
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Jul 31, 2006
    #4
  5. put in a really big RAM disk and put your swap files on it? <g>

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64


    Tony Sperling wrote:
    > You can do some tuning of the Virtual Memory resources - in the Advanced
    > tab of the System Properties dialog there is a Performance Options button
    > - there you can optimize for foreground or background activity - the
    > default is to set it to foreground, so if you have a good supply of RAM
    > you might try and set it to background and see if it helps any?
    >
    > I doubt it that you'll see a significant difference, but it may come back
    > to life again a bit more willingly.
    >
    > I don't know of any way to direct this kind of service to a specific
    > application.
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    >> Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    >> minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    >> noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    >> because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    >> hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    >> Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    >> memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    >> I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    >> applications.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Aug 1, 2006
    #5
  6. Ken J Guest

    There is a way to force an application to use physical memory. Go into the
    Performance tab on system properties and turn off the swap file. Of course,
    this forces all programs to use physical memory.

    You did not say how much RAM your computer has, but this method will
    probably require that you increase your RAM. I solved a similar problem on
    Win XP by going from 512 meg to 1 gig of RAM. 512 megs of RAM cost me $45.

    Ken

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    > Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    > minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    > noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    > because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    > hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    > Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    > memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    > I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    > applications.
    >
     
    Ken J, Aug 1, 2006
    #6
  7. Indeed - the good old RAM disk!

    Tony. . .


    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:e$...
    > put in a really big RAM disk and put your swap files on it? <g>
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >
    >
    > Tony Sperling wrote:
    > > You can do some tuning of the Virtual Memory resources - in the Advanced
    > > tab of the System Properties dialog there is a Performance Options

    button
    > > - there you can optimize for foreground or background activity - the
    > > default is to set it to foreground, so if you have a good supply of RAM
    > > you might try and set it to background and see if it helps any?
    > >
    > > I doubt it that you'll see a significant difference, but it may come

    back
    > > to life again a bit more willingly.
    > >
    > > I don't know of any way to direct this kind of service to a specific
    > > application.
    > >
    > > Tony. . .
    > >
    > >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    > >> Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    > >> minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    > >> noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    > >> because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    > >> hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    > >> Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    > >> memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    > >> I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    > >> applications.

    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Aug 1, 2006
    #7
  8. > put in a really big RAM disk and put your swap files on it? <g>

    Taking RAM away from the system in order to give it to the swap file? :cool:
     
    Homer J. Simpson, Aug 1, 2006
    #8
  9. The original question was about directing a specific application to use
    physical memory - that's one of the things a RAM disk could do. (An old DOS
    trick! Might not be usefull today unless you - or your application, is
    highly motivated.)

    Nice to be remembered, and half-way a joke, I suspect.

    Tony. . .


    "Homer J. Simpson" <root@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > put in a really big RAM disk and put your swap files on it? <g>

    >
    > Taking RAM away from the system in order to give it to the swap file? :cool:
    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Aug 1, 2006
    #9
  10. I've actually seen some interesting devices that are RAM based and function
    as hard disks. They're quite useful at speeding up things in the 32-bit
    world where there's a finite upper limit on the useful RAM available to most
    applications. At least one I saw let you plug in all sorts of old RAM DIMMs
    you had lying around.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64


    Tony Sperling wrote:
    > The original question was about directing a specific application to use
    > physical memory - that's one of the things a RAM disk could do. (An old
    > DOS trick! Might not be usefull today unless you - or your application, is
    > highly motivated.)
    >
    > Nice to be remembered, and half-way a joke, I suspect.
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    > "Homer J. Simpson" <root@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>> put in a really big RAM disk and put your swap files on it? <g>

    >>
    >> Taking RAM away from the system in order to give it to the swap file?
    >> :cool:
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Aug 1, 2006
    #10
  11. Aaron Kelley Guest

    I do this myself...
    I have 4 GB of RAM (never use all of it unless I get pretty serious with
    VMs, which happens sometimes), the computer should almost *never* have to do
    any swapping! But when I had the swap file on, I swear it was doing it, I
    noticed it particularly after I had been away from the computer for a while,
    came back and started going back through several apps I left running... It
    always seemed like it was grinding away, loading stuff back into RAM.

    Am I just seeing things? Is there any disadvantage to having the swap file
    *off*, anyway?

    - Aaron

    "Ken J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There is a way to force an application to use physical memory. Go into
    > the Performance tab on system properties and turn off the swap file. Of
    > course, this forces all programs to use physical memory.
    >
    > You did not say how much RAM your computer has, but this method will
    > probably require that you increase your RAM. I solved a similar problem
    > on Win XP by going from 512 meg to 1 gig of RAM. 512 megs of RAM cost me
    > $45.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    >> Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    >> minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    >> noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    >> because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    >> hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    >> Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    >> memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    >> I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    >> applications.
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Aaron Kelley, Aug 1, 2006
    #11
  12. Some apps have to use the swap file but the usage is relatively small.

    "Aaron Kelley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I do this myself...
    > I have 4 GB of RAM (never use all of it unless I get pretty serious with
    > VMs, which happens sometimes), the computer should almost *never* have to
    > do any swapping! But when I had the swap file on, I swear it was doing
    > it, I noticed it particularly after I had been away from the computer for
    > a while, came back and started going back through several apps I left
    > running... It always seemed like it was grinding away, loading stuff back
    > into RAM.
    >
    > Am I just seeing things? Is there any disadvantage to having the swap
    > file *off*, anyway?
    >
    > - Aaron
    >
    > "Ken J" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> There is a way to force an application to use physical memory. Go into
    >> the Performance tab on system properties and turn off the swap file. Of
    >> course, this forces all programs to use physical memory.
    >>
    >> You did not say how much RAM your computer has, but this method will
    >> probably require that you increase your RAM. I solved a similar problem
    >> on Win XP by going from 512 meg to 1 gig of RAM. 512 megs of RAM cost me
    >> $45.
    >>
    >> Ken
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    >>> Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    >>> minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    >>> noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    >>> because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    >>> hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    >>> Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    >>> memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    >>> I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    >>> applications.
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Aug 2, 2006
    #12
  13. Much of what I know is now obsolete, I often only find out when somebody
    here among this excellent community corrects me, which I am always pleased
    about. I do not enjoy spreading nonsense. Having said that, when I tought
    myself to program, I learned that the swapping system was an integral part
    of the Windows Memory Management System, and that an amazing amount of quite
    smart work is being directed through it.

    One thing about this system was that it never swapped any data to the swap
    file - only code! The applications know where they keep their own data and
    if the system sees it fit to dump some of that data there would be no
    performance benefit to reload it from the swap file as opposed to reloading
    it from where it is residing.

    The swap file is only used to give Windows the smooth User Experience that
    it mostly does have. So, code that executes menus and window sizes and
    positions and stuff, gets tucked away in a fixed position on the disk and
    can therefore be reloaded quite rapidly so as not to delay redrawing a
    window that was temporarily hidden behind another.

    This is why Swap file defragging isn't making any sense. Nothing is ever
    stored in there, if the space is needed it simply overwrites the oldest
    information in there, and if that then is needed it will be reloaded from
    the system and the system sees a performance hit. In a memory constrained
    system you will see a lot of swapping but only a limited part of that is
    swap file activity, most is normal reloading of old data that was dumped in
    favour of fresher stuff.

    In a system with a healthy supply of memory, relatively little activity in
    the swapfile should occur. When people see such activity ( and I have
    certainly seen it myself ) it could concievably be system housekeeping that
    has been delayed because of high activity in a system with a very good
    supply of memory where delaying is possible.

    My own recommendation concerning the swap file, is to have a small system
    partition (C:\) with nothing much else on it, and to keep a small swap file
    (say 300 - 500MB) there. Put your large and demanding applications on
    another partition(s) and set up a swap file of the system recommended size
    (1.5 x memory size) (Half on each if you have two partitions). Many thinks
    this is horrific waste. But what is 1.5 GB out of today's multi GB x 100
    disks? Even better is if you have a really fast disk, then you put the main
    swap file on that.

    It would seem that some applications make use of swapping technology but I
    would be very surprised if they used the system swap file for that, since it
    is managed internally and has the one minded mission to overwrite whatever
    comes in it's way.

    I cannot tell any more what really is fact and what is myth - the old addage
    "Truth is what emerges when a lie is repeated enough times", rules. Enough
    development has gone into all Window's systems and subsystems that I would
    not be any more than mildly surprised if they had started swapping data to
    the swap file as well.

    Please correct me where I fail!

    Tony. . .



    "Aaron Kelley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do this myself...
    > I have 4 GB of RAM (never use all of it unless I get pretty serious with
    > VMs, which happens sometimes), the computer should almost *never* have to

    do
    > any swapping! But when I had the swap file on, I swear it was doing it, I
    > noticed it particularly after I had been away from the computer for a

    while,
    > came back and started going back through several apps I left running...

    It
    > always seemed like it was grinding away, loading stuff back into RAM.
    >
    > Am I just seeing things? Is there any disadvantage to having the swap

    file
    > *off*, anyway?
    >
    > - Aaron
    >
    > "Ken J" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > There is a way to force an application to use physical memory. Go into
    > > the Performance tab on system properties and turn off the swap file. Of
    > > course, this forces all programs to use physical memory.
    > >
    > > You did not say how much RAM your computer has, but this method will
    > > probably require that you increase your RAM. I solved a similar problem
    > > on Win XP by going from 512 meg to 1 gig of RAM. 512 megs of RAM cost

    me
    > > $45.
    > >
    > > Ken
    > >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> There is an application I almost always keep running when I'm using
    > >> Windows. But I don't always keep that program at the front. When I
    > >> minimize it and restore it after a while, there's a lot of hard disk
    > >> noise and the program doesn't response for some seconds. I know this is
    > >> because Windows tries to swap out minimized applications' memory to
    > >> hard disk. I also heard that there is no way to stop this behaviour.
    > >> Then, is there any way to force a specific application to use physical
    > >> memory as much as possible? I'm not the programmer of that program, so
    > >> I cannot modify the code. I just want to know to do it with ready-made
    > >> applications.
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Aug 2, 2006
    #13
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