For Laptops

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Poster 60, Aug 28, 2005.

  1. Poster 60

    Poster 60 Guest

    Poster 60, Aug 28, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Poster 60

    Imhotep Guest

    Poster 60 wrote:

    >
    > If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    > one you may want to consider this:
    >
    > http://www.lojackforlaptops.com/


    Only for windows :-(
     
    Imhotep, Aug 28, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Poster 60

    Plato Guest

    Poster 60 wrote:
    >
    > If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    > one you may want to consider this:


    Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.







    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Aug 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Poster 60

    Poster 60 Guest

    Plato wrote:
    > Poster 60 wrote:
    >
    >>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >>one you may want to consider this:

    >
    >
    > Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.


    As noted on the learn more page:
    Our patented software is hidden and virtually tamperproof, surviving
    most hard drive reformats and operating system reinstallations.
     
    Poster 60, Aug 28, 2005
    #4
  5. Poster 60

    Plato Guest

    Poster 60 wrote:
    >
    > >>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    > >>one you may want to consider this:

    > >
    > > Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.

    >
    > As noted on the learn more page:
    > Our patented software is hidden and virtually tamperproof, surviving
    > most hard drive reformats and operating system reinstallations.


    LOL. a wipe is writing zeros to the drive.



    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Aug 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Poster 60

    Kevin Reiter Guest

    Imhotep wrote:
    > Poster 60 wrote:
    >
    >
    >>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >>one you may want to consider this:
    >>
    >> http://www.lojackforlaptops.com/

    >
    >
    > Only for windows :-(


    ...and only supports IE if you want to purchase it over the Net.
     
    Kevin Reiter, Aug 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Poster 60

    Imhotep Guest

    Kevin Reiter wrote:

    > Imhotep wrote:
    >> Poster 60 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >>>one you may want to consider this:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.lojackforlaptops.com/

    >>
    >>
    >> Only for windows :-(

    >
    > ..and only supports IE if you want to purchase it over the Net.


    Now that you need to fix...
     
    Imhotep, Aug 28, 2005
    #7
  8. Poster 60

    nemo_outis Guest

    Plato <|@|.|> wrote in news:43112d17$0$211$:

    > Poster 60 wrote:
    >>
    >> >>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >> >>one you may want to consider this:
    >> >
    >> > Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.

    >>
    >> As noted on the learn more page:
    >> Our patented software is hidden and virtually tamperproof, surviving
    >> most hard drive reformats and operating system reinstallations.

    >
    > LOL. a wipe is writing zeros to the drive.
    >
    >
    >


    No, not LOL. Learn before you scoff.

    There are a number of schemes that use the HPA area of the disk
    (essentially the HD underreports its physical size, effectively at the
    hardware level, and uses the extra space for various purposes). Data
    written to the HPA will survive most wiping and formatting efforts - it is
    even possible to use a two-level password scheme to protect this area.

    Phoenix (the BIOS folks) are pushing their HPA scheme these days (for data
    recovery, not anti-theft) but there are many other schemes afoot.

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Aug 28, 2005
    #8
  9. Poster 60

    Imhotep Guest

    nemo_outis wrote:

    > Plato <|@|.|> wrote in news:43112d17$0$211$:
    >
    >> Poster 60 wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >>> >>one you may want to consider this:
    >>> >
    >>> > Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.
    >>>
    >>> As noted on the learn more page:
    >>> Our patented software is hidden and virtually tamperproof, surviving
    >>> most hard drive reformats and operating system reinstallations.

    >>
    >> LOL. a wipe is writing zeros to the drive.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > No, not LOL. Learn before you scoff.
    >
    > There are a number of schemes that use the HPA area of the disk
    > (essentially the HD underreports its physical size, effectively at the
    > hardware level, and uses the extra space for various purposes). Data
    > written to the HPA will survive most wiping and formatting efforts - it is
    > even possible to use a two-level password scheme to protect this area.


    It was my understanding that this area was to be used when the hard disk
    gets errors. In other words, this area was to provide "extra" space
    (sectors) should some sectors go bad.

    > Phoenix (the BIOS folks) are pushing their HPA scheme these days (for data
    > recovery, not anti-theft) but there are many other schemes afoot.
    >
    > Regards,


    Your product is not a bad idea, but two things I would request:
    1) Your web site is IE dependant, if you want me to take you seriously, you
    really should change that....

    2) Since you have a security product, you should think about other OSes
    too...There are a lot of UNIX/linux/BSD/Mac people here...

    Im
     
    Imhotep, Aug 28, 2005
    #9
  10. Poster 60

    nemo_outis Guest

    Imhotep <> wrote in
    news:ZBnQe.64815$:

    > nemo_outis wrote:

    ....snip...
    >>> LOL. a wipe is writing zeros to the drive.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> No, not LOL. Learn before you scoff.
    >>
    >> There are a number of schemes that use the HPA area of the disk
    >> (essentially the HD underreports its physical size, effectively at
    >> the hardware level, and uses the extra space for various purposes).
    >> Data written to the HPA will survive most wiping and formatting
    >> efforts - it is even possible to use a two-level password scheme to
    >> protect this area.

    >
    > It was my understanding that this area was to be used when the hard
    > disk gets errors. In other words, this area was to provide "extra"
    > space (sectors) should some sectors go bad.


    The uses, if any, of the HPA are completely undefined. Until recently
    hardly anyone knew about HPA and even fewer did anything with it.
    (Personally I've long used it as a secret hidey-hole to stash stuff away
    from the prying eyes of sysadmins :)

    Now some programs are coming out that use it. To the extent that they
    become popular and the existence of the HPA becomes better known, then
    all kinds of malware will appear which uses it (and its value to me as a
    hidey-hole will evaporate as did ADS before it.)


    >> Phoenix (the BIOS folks) are pushing their HPA scheme these days (for
    >> data recovery, not anti-theft) but there are many other schemes
    >> afoot.
    >>
    >> Regards,

    >
    > Your product is not a bad idea, but two things I would request:
    > 1) Your web site is IE dependant, if you want me to take you
    > seriously, you really should change that....
    >
    > 2) Since you have a security product, you should think about other
    > OSes too...There are a lot of UNIX/linux/BSD/Mac people here...
    >
    > Im


    Just for your info, I've got *nothing* to do with *any* of these
    commercial schemes - I'm just a commentator because of my interest in
    privacy and security arcana.

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Aug 28, 2005
    #10
  11. Poster 60

    Imhotep Guest

    nemo_outis wrote:

    > Imhotep <> wrote in
    > news:ZBnQe.64815$:
    >
    >> nemo_outis wrote:

    > ...snip...
    >>>> LOL. a wipe is writing zeros to the drive.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> No, not LOL. Learn before you scoff.
    >>>
    >>> There are a number of schemes that use the HPA area of the disk
    >>> (essentially the HD underreports its physical size, effectively at
    >>> the hardware level, and uses the extra space for various purposes).
    >>> Data written to the HPA will survive most wiping and formatting
    >>> efforts - it is even possible to use a two-level password scheme to
    >>> protect this area.

    >>
    >> It was my understanding that this area was to be used when the hard
    >> disk gets errors. In other words, this area was to provide "extra"
    >> space (sectors) should some sectors go bad.

    >
    > The uses, if any, of the HPA are completely undefined. Until recently
    > hardly anyone knew about HPA and even fewer did anything with it.
    > (Personally I've long used it as a secret hidey-hole to stash stuff away
    > from the prying eyes of sysadmins :)


    > Now some programs are coming out that use it. To the extent that they
    > become popular and the existence of the HPA becomes better known, then
    > all kinds of malware will appear which uses it (and its value to me as a
    > hidey-hole will evaporate as did ADS before it.)


    Good point, very good point...

    <snip>

    Imhotep
     
    Imhotep, Aug 29, 2005
    #11
  12. Poster 60

    Moe Trin Guest

    In the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    <>, Poster 60 wrote:

    >Plato wrote:
    >> Poster 60 wrote:

    >
    >>>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >>>one you may want to consider this:


    [STRONG aroma of snake-oil detected]

    Domain Name: LOJACKFORLAPTOPS.COM
    Registrant:
    Juma, Amin
    Absolute Software Corp.
    111 Dunsmuir St.
    Suite 800
    Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 6A3
    CA
    Record created on 15-Mar-2005.

    I wonder if these con-artists got permission from LoJack Corporation in
    Westwood, Massachusetts (USA) to use the name - probably not

    >> Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.


    or if the lap-doggy is connected behind a firewall, or doesn't have a
    modem... yeah - there are a few problems. But it _looks_ like it might
    do something... not sure what.

    Web Results 1 - 10 of about 2,740,000 for disk encryption. (0.23
    seconds)

    Web Results 1 - 10 of about 832,000 for computer recovery theft. (0.28
    seconds)

    (The first two links are to the same company absolute.com, as is the pop-up
    ad)

    Web Results 1 - 10 of about 299,000 for trace stolen computer. (0.25
    seconds)

    >As noted on the learn more page:
    > Our patented software is hidden and virtually tamperproof, surviving
    >most hard drive reformats and operating system reinstallations.


    [bash ]# /bin/dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=2048 count=536870912
    [bash ]#

    Your one Terabyte hard disk is now all zeros, INCLUDING the MBR. The
    program that did that is a part of several O/S - I'd use Toms RootNBoot,
    which is the whole deal on a single 3.5 inch floppy. On a 32 bit
    computer, that command scales to a eight Terabyte max (expandable to
    32 Terabyte with several keystrokes), which is likely to be larger than
    your hard drive for the next two or three years.

    If you have important data on your disk ENCRYPT THE WHOLE FREAKIN' DISK
    using any of the better applications you can find above. Make sure that
    you use a strong passphrase and that this passphrase is NOT stored on
    the computer. Even if your lap doggy is recovered after being stolen,
    how do you know that the "secret data" you have on the disk (the credit
    card numbers, the passwords to that Pr0n site, what-ever) hasn't been
    copied. (Is that a "Duh" moment you just had?) If you can't figure that
    out, you probably should not be trusted with anything as complicated as
    a digital watch, much less a computer.

    ] System Requirements
    ] * Windows XP
    ] * Internet Connection and/or Hayes-compatible modem
    ] * Internet Explorer 6 and above

    Doesn't support other versions of windoze, much less any other operating
    systems. Requires Intersnot Exploiter - thanks, but none of my users
    are so st00pid as to trust software with back doors and exploits out the
    whazoo.

    Old guy
     
    Moe Trin, Aug 29, 2005
    #12
  13. Poster 60

    Imhotep Guest

    Moe Trin wrote:

    > In the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    > <>, Poster 60 wrote:
    >
    >>Plato wrote:
    >>> Poster 60 wrote:

    >>
    >>>>If you have important data on your laptop or if you travel a lot with
    >>>>one you may want to consider this:

    >
    > [STRONG aroma of snake-oil detected]
    >
    > Domain Name: LOJACKFORLAPTOPS.COM
    > Registrant:
    > Juma, Amin
    > Absolute Software Corp.
    > 111 Dunsmuir St.
    > Suite 800
    > Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 6A3
    > CA
    > Record created on 15-Mar-2005.
    >
    > I wonder if these con-artists got permission from LoJack Corporation in
    > Westwood, Massachusetts (USA) to use the name - probably not
    >
    >>> Wont do any good once C: is wiped out by the theifs.

    >
    > or if the lap-doggy is connected behind a firewall, or doesn't have a
    > modem... yeah - there are a few problems. But it _looks_ like it might
    > do something... not sure what.
    >
    > Web Results 1 - 10 of about 2,740,000 for disk encryption. (0.23
    > seconds)
    >
    > Web Results 1 - 10 of about 832,000 for computer recovery theft.
    > (0.28
    > seconds)
    >
    > (The first two links are to the same company absolute.com, as is the
    > pop-up ad)
    >
    > Web Results 1 - 10 of about 299,000 for trace stolen computer. (0.25
    > seconds)
    >
    >>As noted on the learn more page:
    >> Our patented software is hidden and virtually tamperproof, surviving
    >>most hard drive reformats and operating system reinstallations.

    >
    > [bash ]# /bin/dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=2048 count=536870912
    > [bash ]#
    >
    > Your one Terabyte hard disk is now all zeros, INCLUDING the MBR. The
    > program that did that is a part of several O/S - I'd use Toms RootNBoot,
    > which is the whole deal on a single 3.5 inch floppy. On a 32 bit
    > computer, that command scales to a eight Terabyte max (expandable to
    > 32 Terabyte with several keystrokes), which is likely to be larger than
    > your hard drive for the next two or three years.
    >
    > If you have important data on your disk ENCRYPT THE WHOLE FREAKIN' DISK
    > using any of the better applications you can find above. Make sure that
    > you use a strong passphrase and that this passphrase is NOT stored on
    > the computer. Even if your lap doggy is recovered after being stolen,
    > how do you know that the "secret data" you have on the disk (the credit
    > card numbers, the passwords to that Pr0n site, what-ever) hasn't been
    > copied. (Is that a "Duh" moment you just had?) If you can't figure that
    > out, you probably should not be trusted with anything as complicated as
    > a digital watch, much less a computer.
    >
    > ] System Requirements
    > ] * Windows XP
    > ] * Internet Connection and/or Hayes-compatible modem
    > ] * Internet Explorer 6 and above
    >
    > Doesn't support other versions of windoze, much less any other operating
    > systems. Requires Intersnot Exploiter - thanks, but none of my users
    > are so st00pid as to trust software with back doors and exploits out the
    > whazoo.
    >
    > Old guy


    Ouch!!!!!! Damn don't ever get mad at me....

    Im
     
    Imhotep, Aug 29, 2005
    #13
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Walid

    3 laptops at home wireless help !!

    Walid, Jun 24, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    1,841
  2. =?Utf-8?B?Q2F0aGFs?=

    Two laptops, no luck!

    =?Utf-8?B?Q2F0aGFs?=, Nov 15, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    617
    Malke
    Nov 16, 2004
  3. Someone Beneath the Blue Sky

    Many dropouts when connecting two laptops

    Someone Beneath the Blue Sky, Nov 17, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    655
    Jeff Baziuk [MSFT]
    Nov 17, 2004
  4. Mark

    Laptops,laptops

    Mark, Sep 20, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    517
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=
    Sep 20, 2004
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,163
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page