Focus trap with manual lens

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Sandman, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    I've been googling and the results seem bleak, but I'll ask here as
    well. Can I focus trap with a manual lens on Nikon (D800/D4)?

    Specifically, I would like to depress the shutter release fully and then
    twist my focus ring and the camera fires the shutter when it detects a
    focus. This would be great for taking pictures of moving subjects (i.e.
    children) when using manual lenses. I just frame the playing child,
    depress the shutter button and slightly turn the focus ring and *click*.

    As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.

    BUt am I missing something?

    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Aug 27, 2013
    #1
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  2. Sandman

    otter Guest

    On 8/27/2013 3:31 AM, Sandman wrote:
    > I've been googling and the results seem bleak, but I'll ask here as
    > well. Can I focus trap with a manual lens on Nikon (D800/D4)?
    >
    > Specifically, I would like to depress the shutter release fully and then
    > twist my focus ring and the camera fires the shutter when it detects a
    > focus. This would be great for taking pictures of moving subjects (i.e.
    > children) when using manual lenses. I just frame the playing child,
    > depress the shutter button and slightly turn the focus ring and *click*.
    >
    > As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    > priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.
    >
    > BUt am I missing something?
    >


    If you glue a focus confirmation chip on your lens, you can do it.
    otter, Aug 29, 2013
    #2
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  3. Sandman

    RichA Guest

    On Tuesday, August 27, 2013 4:31:36 AM UTC-4, Sandman wrote:
    > I've been googling and the results seem bleak, but I'll ask here as
    >
    > well. Can I focus trap with a manual lens on Nikon (D800/D4)?
    >
    >
    >
    > Specifically, I would like to depress the shutter release fully and then
    >
    > twist my focus ring and the camera fires the shutter when it detects a
    >
    > focus. This would be great for taking pictures of moving subjects (i.e.
    >
    > children) when using manual lenses. I just frame the playing child,
    >
    > depress the shutter button and slightly turn the focus ring and *click*.
    >
    >
    >
    > As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    >
    > priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.
    >
    >
    >
    > BUt am I missing something?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Sandman[.net]


    Get a mirrorless camera with "focus peaking."
    RichA, Aug 29, 2013
    #3
  4. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Le 27/08/2013 10:31, Sandman a écrit :

    > As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    > priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.


    Works in AF-C mode too. That's how I trap my insects, but not with a
    manual lens though.
    Ghost-Rider, Aug 29, 2013
    #4
  5. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <kvmlm7$7j0$>, otter <>
    wrote:

    > On 8/27/2013 3:31 AM, Sandman wrote:
    > > I've been googling and the results seem bleak, but I'll ask here as
    > > well. Can I focus trap with a manual lens on Nikon (D800/D4)?
    > >
    > > Specifically, I would like to depress the shutter release fully and then
    > > twist my focus ring and the camera fires the shutter when it detects a
    > > focus. This would be great for taking pictures of moving subjects (i.e.
    > > children) when using manual lenses. I just frame the playing child,
    > > depress the shutter button and slightly turn the focus ring and *click*.
    > >
    > > As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    > > priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.
    > >
    > > BUt am I missing something?
    > >

    >
    > If you glue a focus confirmation chip on your lens, you can do it.


    Yes, that's what I've learned. So I've actually ordered one now. Thanks
    for the comment!


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Aug 29, 2013
    #5
  6. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <kvmqqk$qnp$>,
    Ghost-Rider <> wrote:

    > Le 27/08/2013 10:31, Sandman a écrit :
    >
    > > As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    > > priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.

    >
    > Works in AF-C mode too. That's how I trap my insects, but not with a
    > manual lens though.


    Exactly, the manual lens is the problem here. the AF metering engine
    apparently turns of when in manual mode, so even if the metering detects
    focus, the software in the camera is not detecting it - according to
    some sources on the web...


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Aug 29, 2013
    #6
  7. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Le 29/08/2013 09:44, Sandman a écrit :

    > Ghost-Rider <> wrote:
    >
    >> Le 27/08/2013 10:31, Sandman a écrit :
    >>
    >>> As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    >>> priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.

    >>
    >> Works in AF-C mode too. That's how I trap my insects, but not with a
    >> manual lens though.

    >
    > Exactly, the manual lens is the problem here. the AF metering engine
    > apparently turns of when in manual mode, so even if the metering detects
    > focus, the software in the camera is not detecting it - according to
    > some sources on the web...


    I can confirm that the metering system of the D90 and of the D7000 work
    with a manual lens and the little light in the viewfinder turns green
    when focus is acquired but unfortunately that is not connected to the
    shutter which can be fired independently of the focus.
    Maybe somebody could hack that.
    Ghost-Rider, Aug 29, 2013
    #7
  8. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <kvo35b$plf$>,
    Ghost-Rider <> wrote:

    > Le 29/08/2013 09:44, Sandman a écrit :
    >
    > > Ghost-Rider <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Le 27/08/2013 10:31, Sandman a écrit :
    > >>
    > >>> As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    > >>> priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.
    > >>
    > >> Works in AF-C mode too. That's how I trap my insects, but not with a
    > >> manual lens though.

    > >
    > > Exactly, the manual lens is the problem here. the AF metering engine
    > > apparently turns of when in manual mode, so even if the metering detects
    > > focus, the software in the camera is not detecting it - according to
    > > some sources on the web...

    >
    > I can confirm that the metering system of the D90 and of the D7000 work
    > with a manual lens and the little light in the viewfinder turns green
    > when focus is acquired but unfortunately that is not connected to the
    > shutter which can be fired independently of the focus.
    > Maybe somebody could hack that.


    Yes, according to several sources, you can get a glue-on AF chip for any
    lens. So you fool the camera that it has an AF lens, and with the
    correct settings, you should be able to trap focus. I've ordered one and
    I'll report back when I got it :)


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Aug 29, 2013
    #8
  9. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Le 29/08/2013 21:40, Sandman a écrit :
    > In article <kvo35b$plf$>,
    > Ghost-Rider <> wrote:
    >
    >> Le 29/08/2013 09:44, Sandman a écrit :
    >>
    >>> Ghost-Rider <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Le 27/08/2013 10:31, Sandman a écrit :
    >>>>
    >>>>> As far as I can make out, focus priority require autofocus. I.e. focus
    >>>>> priority is ignored unless the camera is in AF-S mode.
    >>>>
    >>>> Works in AF-C mode too. That's how I trap my insects, but not with a
    >>>> manual lens though.
    >>>
    >>> Exactly, the manual lens is the problem here. the AF metering engine
    >>> apparently turns of when in manual mode, so even if the metering detects
    >>> focus, the software in the camera is not detecting it - according to
    >>> some sources on the web...

    >>
    >> I can confirm that the metering system of the D90 and of the D7000 work
    >> with a manual lens and the little light in the viewfinder turns green
    >> when focus is acquired but unfortunately that is not connected to the
    >> shutter which can be fired independently of the focus.
    >> Maybe somebody could hack that.

    >
    > Yes, according to several sources, you can get a glue-on AF chip for any
    > lens. So you fool the camera that it has an AF lens, and with the
    > correct settings, you should be able to trap focus. I've ordered one and
    > I'll report back when I got it :)


    I have a 500 mm fully manual old mirror lens so I would be very
    interested. Focusing with such a beast is quite an experience so if the
    shutter was released only when focus is acquired that would be grand !
    I'm waiting for your feed-back.
    Ghost-Rider, Aug 29, 2013
    #9
  10. Sandman

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/29/2013 4:40 PM, Ghost-Rider wrote:


    <snip>

    >
    > I have a 500 mm fully manual old mirror lens so I would be very
    > interested. Focusing with such a beast is quite an experience so if the
    > shutter was released only when focus is acquired that would be grand !
    > I'm waiting for your feed-back.
    >
    >


    I too have an old 500 mirror. Every so often I take it out and try. One
    of my friends uses one for close focus work, with extension tubes.
    I have never had success with it for wildlife.


    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Aug 30, 2013
    #10
  11. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Le 30/08/2013 03:15, PeterN a écrit :

    > I too have an old 500 mirror. Every so often I take it out and try. One
    > of my friends uses one for close focus work, with extension tubes.
    > I have never had success with it for wildlife.


    It's very difficult to focus with precision.
    It takes a sturdy tripod too.
    Moving subjects cannot be focused properly.
    Here is one of my very few successes.
    http://cjoint.com/13au/CHElwNAM4vu_dsc_1902_ac_1_1-001.jpg

    The 18-300 is a lot better for wildlife : continuous autofocus, VR...
    Ghost-Rider, Aug 30, 2013
    #11
  12. Sandman

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/30/2013 5:28 AM, Ghost-Rider wrote:
    > Le 30/08/2013 03:15, PeterN a écrit :
    >
    >> I too have an old 500 mirror. Every so often I take it out and try. One
    >> of my friends uses one for close focus work, with extension tubes.
    >> I have never had success with it for wildlife.

    >
    > It's very difficult to focus with precision.
    > It takes a sturdy tripod too.
    > Moving subjects cannot be focused properly.
    > Here is one of my very few successes.
    > http://cjoint.com/13au/CHElwNAM4vu_dsc_1902_ac_1_1-001.jpg
    >
    > The 18-300 is a lot better for wildlife : continuous autofocus, VR...
    >
    >

    That image is tack sharp, where it should be.
    I use the 80-400.
    this was a heavy crop
    <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/feeding%20junior.jpg>

    <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/hummer%20flying1.jpg>



    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Aug 30, 2013
    #12
  13. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Le 30/08/2013 15:52, PeterN a écrit :
    > On 8/30/2013 5:28 AM, Ghost-Rider wrote:


    >> http://cjoint.com/13au/CHElwNAM4vu_dsc_1902_ac_1_1-001.jpg
    >>
    >> The 18-300 is a lot better for wildlife : continuous autofocus, VR...
    >>

    > That image is tack sharp, where it should be.


    It took me about 2 hours to focus. Good thing herons don't move much !

    > I use the 80-400.
    > this was a heavy crop
    > <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/feeding%20junior.jpg>


    Yes, heavy...
    >
    > <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/hummer%20flying1.jpg>


    Humming birds are diabolical : just when they're in focus and you want
    to activate the shutter, they move. Just like the syrphs which fly
    stationary until you shoot them.
    http://cjoint.com/13au/CHEwvtKFUzM_d90_13353-001_1.jpg
    Ghost-Rider, Aug 30, 2013
    #13
  14. Sandman

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/30/2013 4:24 PM, Ghost-Rider wrote:
    > Le 30/08/2013 15:52, PeterN a écrit :
    >> On 8/30/2013 5:28 AM, Ghost-Rider wrote:

    >
    >>> http://cjoint.com/13au/CHElwNAM4vu_dsc_1902_ac_1_1-001.jpg
    >>>
    >>> The 18-300 is a lot better for wildlife : continuous autofocus, VR...
    >>>

    >> That image is tack sharp, where it should be.

    >
    > It took me about 2 hours to focus. Good thing herons don't move much !
    >
    >> I use the 80-400.
    >> this was a heavy crop
    >> <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/feeding%20junior.jpg>

    >
    > Yes, heavy...
    >>
    >> <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/hummer%20flying1.jpg>

    >
    > Humming birds are diabolical : just when they're in focus and you want
    > to activate the shutter, they move. Just like the syrphs which fly
    > stationary until you shoot them.
    > http://cjoint.com/13au/CHEwvtKFUzM_d90_13353-001_1.jpg
    >


    You don't seem to understand about the meetings. Birds have meetings at
    which they agree that if the photographer has the camera pointed at
    them, do something uninteresting. Then just when he looks away, catch a
    fish, and fly out of range. My guess is that bugs have similar meetings
    and discussions.



    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Aug 30, 2013
    #14
  15. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Le 30/08/2013 22:38, PeterN a écrit :

    > You don't seem to understand about the meetings. Birds have meetings at
    > which they agree that if the photographer has the camera pointed at
    > them, do something uninteresting. Then just when he looks away, catch a
    > fish, and fly out of range. My guess is that bugs have similar meetings
    > and discussions.


    You are absolutely right. That's the reason why I could never shoot a
    kingfisher since I have problems with their language.
    As for the insects, with which I socialize quite a lot, I have developed
    an pre-insect brain which enables me now to communicate with them (in
    simple terms since my brain is not half as sophisticated as theirs) and
    take photographs of them in intimate occupations, like this :
    http://cjoint.com/13au/CHFq6lkOC9k_d90_11563-004.jpg
    Ghost-Rider, Aug 31, 2013
    #15
  16. Sandman

    Ghost-Rider Guest

    Ghost-Rider, Aug 31, 2013
    #16
  17. Sandman

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/31/2013 11:04 AM, Ghost-Rider wrote:
    > Le 30/08/2013 22:38, PeterN a écrit :
    >
    >> You don't seem to understand about the meetings. Birds have meetings at
    >> which they agree that if the photographer has the camera pointed at
    >> them, do something uninteresting. Then just when he looks away, catch a
    >> fish, and fly out of range. My guess is that bugs have similar meetings
    >> and discussions.

    >
    > You are absolutely right. That's the reason why I could never shoot a
    > kingfisher since I have problems with their language.
    > As for the insects, with which I socialize quite a lot, I have developed
    > an pre-insect brain which enables me now to communicate with them (in
    > simple terms since my brain is not half as sophisticated as theirs) and
    > take photographs of them in intimate occupations, like this :
    > http://cjoint.com/13au/CHFq6lkOC9k_d90_11563-004.jpg
    >
    >

    Nicely done.

    Do I see one of them blushing?

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Aug 31, 2013
    #17
  18. Sandman

    PeterN Guest

    On 8/31/2013 11:04 AM, Ghost-Rider wrote:
    > Le 30/08/2013 22:38, PeterN a écrit :
    >
    >> You don't seem to understand about the meetings. Birds have meetings at
    >> which they agree that if the photographer has the camera pointed at
    >> them, do something uninteresting. Then just when he looks away, catch a
    >> fish, and fly out of range. My guess is that bugs have similar meetings
    >> and discussions.

    >
    > You are absolutely right. That's the reason why I could never shoot a
    > kingfisher since I have problems with their language.
    > As for the insects, with which I socialize quite a lot, I have developed
    > an pre-insect brain which enables me now to communicate with them (in
    > simple terms since my brain is not half as sophisticated as theirs) and
    > take photographs of them in intimate occupations, like this :
    > http://cjoint.com/13au/CHFq6lkOC9k_d90_11563-004.jpg
    >
    >

    This guy was too busy to pose.

    <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/bee145.jpg>

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Aug 31, 2013
    #18
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