flash too bright with digital cameras?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by louise, Dec 24, 2006.

  1. louise

    louise Guest

    I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting
    indoors, both cameras invariably shoot too bright - the
    flash is too much for the setting.

    The Sony has a setting for lowering the flash but even with
    that set, many indoor photos are overexposed he because of
    the flash. And this is often true for the Canon as well.

    Is there a trick? A way around this? Is there another
    setting one could use to compensate somehow?

    I have a Nikon film camera with a built in flash and it
    never creates this problem. And yet, I've seen several
    digitals do so.

    Help?

    TIA

    Louise
    louise, Dec 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. "louise" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both cameras
    >invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the setting.
    > The Sony has a setting for lowering the flash but even with that set, many
    > indoor photos are overexposed he because of the flash. And this is often
    > true for the Canon as well.
    >
    > Is there a trick? A way around this? Is there another setting one could
    > use to compensate somehow?
    >
    > Help?
    > Louise


    Could the flash control be separate and lower down the menu? It is with my
    Coolpix 4500 - almost the last item to get to, but effective when changed.

    --
    M Stewart
    Milton Keynes, UK



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Malcolm Stewart, Dec 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. louise

    Steph Guest

    I frequently have to reduce the exposure setting by 1 or 1.5 stops,
    especially with close-ups. The other alternative is to put a piece of thin
    white fabric over the flash to soften and diffuse it?

    "louise" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both cameras
    >invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the setting.
    Steph, Dec 24, 2006
    #3
  4. louise

    Chuck Guest

    A thought-- With my C8080, and an FL 36, it's obvious that the exposure
    metering mode has a great deal to do with the success of flash exposure.
    Do you know what metering mode is used? (such as spot or average)

    "Steph" <> wrote in message
    news:CZtjh.12150$...
    > I frequently have to reduce the exposure setting by 1 or 1.5 stops,
    > especially with close-ups. The other alternative is to put a piece of

    thin
    > white fabric over the flash to soften and diffuse it?
    >
    > "louise" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both

    cameras
    > >invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the setting.

    >
    >
    Chuck, Dec 25, 2006
    #4
  5. louise

    Alan Browne Guest

    louise wrote:
    > I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both
    > cameras invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the
    > setting.
    >
    > The Sony has a setting for lowering the flash but even with that set,
    > many indoor photos are overexposed he because of the flash. And this is
    > often true for the Canon as well.
    >
    > Is there a trick? A way around this? Is there another setting one
    > could use to compensate somehow?


    If the subject is darker than the exposure systems reference point
    (somewhere around 12 - 18% grey), then the system will tend to flash
    longer to get a 12 - 18 % grey exposure.

    When shooting dark subjects set the flash (or exposure comp) to a -ve
    value (-1 to -1.5 or even -2). (Assumes the camera has exp.
    compensation ... many do).

    When shooting very light subjects do the opposite.

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
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    -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, Dec 25, 2006
    #5
  6. louise

    louise Guest

    Chuck wrote:
    > A thought-- With my C8080, and an FL 36, it's obvious that the exposure
    > metering mode has a great deal to do with the success of flash exposure.
    > Do you know what metering mode is used? (such as spot or average)
    >
    > "Steph" <> wrote in message
    > news:CZtjh.12150$...
    >> I frequently have to reduce the exposure setting by 1 or 1.5 stops,
    >> especially with close-ups. The other alternative is to put a piece of

    > thin
    >> white fabric over the flash to soften and diffuse it?
    >>
    >> "louise" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both

    > cameras
    >>> invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the setting.

    >>

    >
    >

    usually it's average - would you suggest trying spot?

    Louise
    louise, Dec 27, 2006
    #6
  7. louise

    a630 user Guest

    I got a Canon A-630 this week, and seem to have the same problem.

    Any pictures taken "close up in Auto mode" look overly bright. In fact,
    people in those pictures look like those models in wax museums:)


    louise wrote:
    > Chuck wrote:
    > > A thought-- With my C8080, and an FL 36, it's obvious that the exposure
    > > metering mode has a great deal to do with the success of flash exposure.
    > > Do you know what metering mode is used? (such as spot or average)
    > >
    > > "Steph" <> wrote in message
    > > news:CZtjh.12150$...
    > >> I frequently have to reduce the exposure setting by 1 or 1.5 stops,
    > >> especially with close-ups. The other alternative is to put a piece of

    > > thin
    > >> white fabric over the flash to soften and diffuse it?
    > >>
    > >> "louise" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >>> I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both

    > > cameras
    > >>> invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the setting.
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    > usually it's average - would you suggest trying spot?
    >
    > Louise
    a630 user, Dec 27, 2006
    #7
  8. louise

    SteveB Guest

    "a630 user" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I got a Canon A-630 this week, and seem to have the same problem.
    >
    > Any pictures taken "close up in Auto mode" look overly bright. In fact,
    > people in those pictures look like those models in wax museums:)
    >
    >
    > louise wrote:
    >> Chuck wrote:
    >> > A thought-- With my C8080, and an FL 36, it's obvious that the exposure
    >> > metering mode has a great deal to do with the success of flash
    >> > exposure.
    >> > Do you know what metering mode is used? (such as spot or average)
    >> >
    >> > "Steph" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:CZtjh.12150$...
    >> >> I frequently have to reduce the exposure setting by 1 or 1.5 stops,
    >> >> especially with close-ups. The other alternative is to put a piece of
    >> > thin
    >> >> white fabric over the flash to soften and diffuse it?
    >> >>
    >> >> "louise" <> wrote in message
    >> >> news:...
    >> >>> I have a Canon A520 and a Sony DSC H1. When shooting indoors, both
    >> > cameras
    >> >>> invariably shoot too bright - the flash is too much for the setting.
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >> usually it's average - would you suggest trying spot?
    >>
    >> Louise

    >


    With a few digicams I've owned/used, the problem is not so much overexposure
    more that the white balance is uncorrected for the blue/white flash light.
    This totally washes out skin tones, giving the waxworks look. If it cannot
    be corrected for with the camera's white balance options (some can, some
    can't) then the only fix is to cover the flash with a compensating orange
    transparent filter. If you get the filter colour right then this is a
    really good fix. I've used a clear inkjet label with an orange colour
    printed on it, with another clear label over it for protection. RGB values
    of 255,228,189 worked very well on one camera I had but it will depend on
    the printer/flash & camera combination as to what works in practice.
    SteveB, Dec 27, 2006
    #8
  9. louise

    ASAAR Guest

    On 26 Dec 2006 22:01:11 -0800, a630 user wrote:

    > I got a Canon A-630 this week, and seem to have the same problem.
    >
    > Any pictures taken "close up in Auto mode" look overly bright. In fact,
    > people in those pictures look like those models in wax museums:)


    As Chuck hinted - the metering mode may be responsible. Assuming
    that the A630 is similar to the A620, in Auto mode, Evaluative
    metering is used, which probably gives good results if the
    subject(s) fill the frame. But if not, the background will also be
    used to calculate exposure. Since it's farther away, the flash will
    pump out more light, overexposing near objects. The solution is to
    use something other than Auto Mode, such as P, Tv, Av or M, which
    will allow you to select Center Weighted Average or Spot. I tried
    shooting a small object centered in the frame and with Evaluative
    metering the subject was grossly overexposed. Using CWA or Spot
    metering allowed the subject to get a decent exposure, but the
    background was naturally much more underexposed. That's to be
    expected when a single flash is used in dim lighting conditions.

    Whether it's desirable or not depends on the effect you're trying
    to get, and adding additional flashes or other lights isn't the only
    way to brighten the background. The A630 has a Night Scene mode
    that uses the flash with a slower shutter speed to help brighten the
    background. Unfortunately, the Night Scene mode forces the use of
    Evaluative metering which can again overexpose close subjects, but
    you can get the same effect using Tv or M mode to slow the shutter
    speed if Night Scene mode doesn't produce the best exposure.
    ASAAR, Dec 27, 2006
    #9
  10. louise

    Jack Mac Guest

    On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 02:34:40 -0500, ASAAR <> wrote:

    >On 26 Dec 2006 22:01:11 -0800, a630 user wrote:
    >
    >> I got a Canon A-630 this week, and seem to have the same problem.
    >>
    >> Any pictures taken "close up in Auto mode" look overly bright. In fact,
    >> people in those pictures look like those models in wax museums:)

    >
    > As Chuck hinted - the metering mode may be responsible. Assuming
    >that the A630 is similar to the A620, in Auto mode, Evaluative
    >metering is used, which probably gives good results if the
    >subject(s) fill the frame. But if not, the background will also be
    >used to calculate exposure. Since it's farther away, the flash will
    >pump out more light, overexposing near objects. The solution is to
    >use something other than Auto Mode, such as P, Tv, Av or M, which
    >will allow you to select Center Weighted Average or Spot. I tried
    >shooting a small object centered in the frame and with Evaluative
    >metering the subject was grossly overexposed. Using CWA or Spot
    >metering allowed the subject to get a decent exposure, but the
    >background was naturally much more underexposed. That's to be
    >expected when a single flash is used in dim lighting conditions.
    >
    > Whether it's desirable or not depends on the effect you're trying
    >to get, and adding additional flashes or other lights isn't the only
    >way to brighten the background. The A630 has a Night Scene mode
    >that uses the flash with a slower shutter speed to help brighten the
    >background. Unfortunately, the Night Scene mode forces the use of
    >Evaluative metering which can again overexpose close subjects, but
    >you can get the same effect using Tv or M mode to slow the shutter
    >speed if Night Scene mode doesn't produce the best exposure.



    'way back when I had an Olympus 2000 I had that problem and the
    quick fix I used was a small piece of black electrical tape place over
    half the flash window. It worked to my satisfaction.
    Not hi-tech but it worked.
    Jack Mac, Dec 27, 2006
    #10
  11. louise

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 08:10:35 -0500, Jack Mac flashed this:

    > 'way back when I had an Olympus 2000 I had that problem and the
    > quick fix I used was a small piece of black electrical tape place over
    > half the flash window. It worked to my satisfaction.
    > Not hi-tech but it worked.


    Nowadays cameras use Flash Exposure Compensation to do that. If
    you were wise enough to secure an unbreakable patent on your sticky,
    manually operated invention before FEC was introduced, you might be
    willing to share some of your royaltees, or at the very least, start
    a Free Flash Foundation that distributes a couple of flash units
    annually to those that submit the most useful flash tips. :)
    ASAAR, Dec 27, 2006
    #11
  12. louise

    Jack Mac Guest

    On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 08:51:34 -0500, ASAAR <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 08:10:35 -0500, Jack Mac flashed this:
    >
    >> 'way back when I had an Olympus 2000 I had that problem and the
    >> quick fix I used was a small piece of black electrical tape place over
    >> half the flash window. It worked to my satisfaction.
    >> Not hi-tech but it worked.

    >
    > Nowadays cameras use Flash Exposure Compensation to do that. If
    >you were wise enough to secure an unbreakable patent on your sticky,
    >manually operated invention before FEC was introduced, you might be
    >willing to share some of your royaltees, or at the very least, start
    >a Free Flash Foundation that distributes a couple of flash units
    >annually to those that submit the most useful flash tips. :)


    Apparently the Flash Exposure Compensation feature isn't doing a
    very good job on the OP's camera or the photos wouldn't be too bright!
    Now that I think back, it wasn't my Olympus 2000 that I put the tape on.
    It was long before that on the old Sony FD-7. I think I paid $700 for it
    back then.... and it didn't even have a view finder...only LCD.
    I was proud to have it though. :)
    Jack Mac, Dec 28, 2006
    #12
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