Firworks

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by eclaire, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. eclaire

    eclaire Guest

    I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    (nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.
     
    eclaire, Jun 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. eclaire

    JohnR66 Guest

    "eclaire" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    > (nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.
    >

    I don't know the capabilities of you camera model, but if the camera has a
    bulb mode, set it to F8 at ISO 100 and use the bulb mode to hold the shutter
    open during the burst. experiment with other apertures. Use a tripod to
    steady the camera.
    John
     
    JohnR66, Jun 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. If you think about it the burst itself is bright...as bright as
    daylight...almost. Your meter will be useless of course. The trick is to
    leave the shutter open long enough to get some movement. How does the
    inverse law work.... ISO 100 so aperture 1/100 but what
    speed...well...doesn't matter in this case. Leave the shutter open as long
    as you can. Surprisingly its very easy to over expose. Waiting for the burst
    might make you a bit late...there might be no reason to wait if the night is
    dark. Click when you see the tracer. I should take notes...I do it every
    year but forget what I do.

    I live in Easton PA where we don't celebrate the 4th. We celebrate Heritage
    Day on the Sunday after the forth....the tenth this year....to commemorate
    the first public reading of the Declaration in the town square. So if you
    don't get it right come to Easton and try again. We have a festival all day
    and fireworks at night. We have a great show and it costs us less as no one
    else is doing it that night.


    "JohnR66" <> wrote in message
    news:Ys_we.374521$...
    > "eclaire" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    > > (nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.
    > >

    > I don't know the capabilities of you camera model, but if the camera has a
    > bulb mode, set it to F8 at ISO 100 and use the bulb mode to hold the

    shutter
    > open during the burst. experiment with other apertures. Use a tripod to
    > steady the camera.
    > John
    >
    >
     
    Gene Palmiter, Jul 1, 2005
    #3
  4. eclaire

    Guest

    In message <>,
    "eclaire" <> wrote:

    >I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    >(nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.


    First, mount it on a tripod, otherwise *your* motion will be recorded
    (not that there's anything wrong with that, but it may not be what you
    want).

    Second, remember that firework exposure is more like flash exposure than
    ambient light exposure; the length of the exposure has no effect on the
    exposure of each trail. The length of the exposure only affect how big
    a slice of the sky's time you capture. The burning powder keeps moving
    through the scene, so *it* determines its own exposure. Start out with
    f/8 and ISO 100. If the streaks look dark in the review, switch to
    f5.6. If they are whitish or washed out when they are supposed to be
    colored, then stop down to f11, etc. Find the right f/stop that gives
    you bright, but colorful streaks.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Jul 1, 2005
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    "eclaire" <> wrote:

    > I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    > (nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.


    Manually focus on a distant object. Set the camera to ISO 100 @ f10 to
    get the exposure correct. A tripod is required and a remote control is
    good to have. Don't trust the low res image on the LCD - if it looks
    good on the LCD, you've probably overexposed the fireworks very badly.

    The length of the exposure is up to you. You can go for a very long
    exposure to produce long streaks and good ambient lighting or you can
    use a short exposure to freeze patterned fireworks. You might be able
    to use f6 to f8 if good ambient lighting is important but some parts of
    the wireworks will turn white.
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Jul 1, 2005
    #5
  6. eclaire <> wrote:
    : I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    : (nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.

    I agree with what the other responders have said. But I will throw out
    this suggestion. I frequently shoot fireworks shows and like a sky full of
    bursts. So I set my camera on a tripod, and use a bulb setting, focus at
    infinity, and a medium range f-stop (this is actually not as critical as
    on most photos). Then I hold the shutter open for several bursts.
    Sometimes even making a 30 second or more exposure. All the "sparklies"
    that went off in that time will be captured in a single image.

    In the past I also tried hand held 1-2 sec exposures and got some
    interresting images. The inherant camera shake from hand holding makes the
    traces of fire wiggly. It actually comes out rather pretty. But you may
    want to try it both ways. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 1, 2005
    #6
  7. eclaire

    Jer Guest

    Randy Berbaum wrote:
    > eclaire <> wrote:
    > : I would like to take fireworks pictures with my new digital camera
    > : (nikon coolpix 8800). Can someone give me some advice on how to do it.
    >
    > I agree with what the other responders have said. But I will throw out
    > this suggestion. I frequently shoot fireworks shows and like a sky full of
    > bursts. So I set my camera on a tripod, and use a bulb setting, focus at
    > infinity, and a medium range f-stop (this is actually not as critical as
    > on most photos). Then I hold the shutter open for several bursts.
    > Sometimes even making a 30 second or more exposure. All the "sparklies"
    > that went off in that time will be captured in a single image.
    >
    > In the past I also tried hand held 1-2 sec exposures and got some
    > interresting images. The inherant camera shake from hand holding makes the
    > traces of fire wiggly. It actually comes out rather pretty. But you may
    > want to try it both ways. :)
    >
    > Randy
    >
    > ==========
    > Randy Berbaum
    > Champaign, IL
    >



    Interesting you mentioned the 'wiggly' parts. I noticed some wiggly
    parts when I was doing fireworks while in photo school many, many years
    ago. I didn't see much different until enlargements to poster size
    revealed each trail to be 'wiggly' like a pig's tail. My first thought
    was my tripod wasn't as secure as I thought, but I subsequently learned
    why I was wrong about that. Each projectile of a burst is cylinder
    shaped, and they're tumbling end over end. Only one end of each
    cylinder is fitted with a fuse, so only one end is burning as it flies
    away form the burst center (point of ignition). It's the burning ends
    of the tumbling cylinder that give each trace a wiggly appearance.
    Since this was one of the more funner parts of photo school, this framed
    enlargement is still on the wall here.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'
     
    Jer, Jul 1, 2005
    #7
  8. eclaire

    Frank ess Guest

    Frank ess, Jul 1, 2005
    #8
  9. Jer <> wrote:
    : Randy Berbaum wrote:
    : >
    : > In the past I also tried hand held 1-2 sec exposures and got some
    : > interresting images. The inherant camera shake from hand holding
    : > makes the traces of fire wiggly. It actually comes out rather pretty.
    : > But you may want to try it both ways. :)

    : Interesting you mentioned the 'wiggly' parts. I noticed some wiggly
    : parts when I was doing fireworks while in photo school many, many years
    : ago. I didn't see much different until enlargements to poster size
    : revealed each trail to be 'wiggly' like a pig's tail. My first thought
    : was my tripod wasn't as secure as I thought, but I subsequently learned
    : why I was wrong about that. Each projectile of a burst is cylinder
    : shaped, and they're tumbling end over end. Only one end of each
    : cylinder is fitted with a fuse, so only one end is burning as it flies
    : away form the burst center (point of ignition). It's the burning ends
    : of the tumbling cylinder that give each trace a wiggly appearance.
    : Since this was one of the more funner parts of photo school, this framed
    : enlargement is still on the wall here.

    You are right, But when you hand hold all the wigglies, even at low
    magnification, line up giving the large puffball bursts (I know they are
    called Crysanthimum (SP?) but I can't spell that the same way two times in
    a row) come out looking like one of those frilly edged carnations. :) An
    interresting effect.

    Another kind of burst that makes for interresting images, either hand held
    or "podded", are the whistling types. The whistles tend to spiral widely
    and make sudden wild angles in their flight. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 2, 2005
    #9
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