First DVD to go bad on me!

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Rich, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. Rich

    Stan Brown Guest

    Tue, 04 Apr 2006 18:09:56 GMT from Tim V. <tsvemail-
    >:
    > I've had a CD distintigrate inside my cdrom. It literally blew into a
    > million pieces. It was disc #1 of 3, so I was able to get a replacement
    > by getting product codes off the remaining cd's.


    Do you mean the manufacturer replaced it? How long had you had it?

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com/
    DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
    other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
    Stan Brown, Apr 4, 2006
    #21
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  2. Rich

    Steve Guest

    On Tue, 4 Apr 2006 15:24:11 -0400, Jeff Rife <> wrote:

    >Tim V. () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >> You can also look at it like: at $1 a blank disc, it is still somewhat
    >> cost effective to backup your $6 bargain bin movie.

    >
    >Or, at about $1.33/original disc, you can just put everything onto a hard
    >drive and have all your DVDs instantly available, while the originals sit
    >safely in their boxes.


    I used to think that, but in reality hard drives are VERY unreliable
    if they have to be disconnected and reconnected. I've lost data on
    Sata drives when the flimsy cable wasn't attached properly during
    boot, IDE drives have failed due to static, both types have had data
    corrupted when XP/W2K has mistakenly assigned the same drive letter to
    two drives on first boot..I've losgt an entire editing project on a
    USB external drive - I never found out why..the point is there are so
    many potential ways to damage the data on a drive... If I have
    critical dat I always get it off to a couple of Taiyo-Yudens.

    As for backing up DVDs, I have copied just a few in my colletion that
    have become rare, such as "This Island Earth" and "Hurricane." Also I
    backed up the Original DVD of "Splash." While there is now a better
    DVD, it is ironic to mention that that original one has developed
    errors and freezes in any player, but the backup is ok..

    ... Steve .
    Steve, Apr 5, 2006
    #22
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  3. Rich

    Jeff Rife Guest

    Steve () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    > >Or, at about $1.33/original disc, you can just put everything onto a hard
    > >drive and have all your DVDs instantly available, while the originals sit
    > >safely in their boxes.

    >
    > I used to think that, but in reality hard drives are VERY unreliable
    > if they have to be disconnected and reconnected. I've lost data on
    > Sata drives when the flimsy cable wasn't attached properly during
    > boot, IDE drives have failed due to static, both types have had data
    > corrupted when XP/W2K has mistakenly assigned the same drive letter to
    > two drives on first boot..I've losgt an entire editing project on a
    > USB external drive - I never found out why..the point is there are so
    > many potential ways to damage the data on a drive...


    Who cares? This is a *backup* of your DVDs. You have the originals
    safely tucked away, and can re-create the data on the hard drive any
    time you want.

    On the other hand, I haven't lost any data on *any* hard drive since
    I went to the policy of having data redundancy (RAID-1 or 5) and backing
    up truly critical data to another machine.

    --
    Jeff Rife | "Wheel of morality,
    | Turn, turn, turn.
    | Tell us the lesson
    | That we should learn"
    | -- Yakko, "Animaniacs"
    Jeff Rife, Apr 5, 2006
    #23
  4. Rich

    Steve Guest

    On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 16:35:04 -0400, Jeff Rife <> wrote:

    >Steve () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >> >Or, at about $1.33/original disc, you can just put everything onto a hard
    >> >drive and have all your DVDs instantly available, while the originals sit
    >> >safely in their boxes.

    >>
    >> I used to think that, but in reality hard drives are VERY unreliable
    >> if they have to be disconnected and reconnected. I've lost data on
    >> Sata drives when the flimsy cable wasn't attached properly during
    >> boot, IDE drives have failed due to static, both types have had data
    >> corrupted when XP/W2K has mistakenly assigned the same drive letter to
    >> two drives on first boot..I've losgt an entire editing project on a
    >> USB external drive - I never found out why..the point is there are so
    >> many potential ways to damage the data on a drive...

    >
    >Who cares? This is a *backup* of your DVDs. You have the originals
    >safely tucked away, and can re-create the data on the hard drive any
    >time you want.


    But it's a lot of effort wasted.
    >
    >On the other hand, I haven't lost any data on *any* hard drive since
    >I went to the policy of having data redundancy (RAID-1 or 5) and backing
    >up truly critical data to another machine.


    This is ofline storage, data shuttles shipped via mail etc. You can't
    run everything in Raid pairs when dealing with humongous amounts of
    data for full-time timeline editing.

    ... Steve ..
    Steve, Apr 5, 2006
    #24
  5. Rich

    Jeff Rife Guest

    Steve () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    > >Who cares? This is a *backup* of your DVDs. You have the originals
    > >safely tucked away, and can re-create the data on the hard drive any
    > >time you want.

    >
    > But it's a lot of effort wasted.


    It takes less time (and money, if you want bit-for-bit accuracy of all
    your discs) to copy DVDs to a hard drive than to copy them to DVD-R. And,
    you really only have to do it once.

    > This is ofline storage, data shuttles shipped via mail etc. You can't
    > run everything in Raid pairs when dealing with humongous amounts of
    > data for full-time timeline editing.


    The more data you have, and the more critical it is, you can't afford *not*
    to have some sort of on-line protection like RAID. If *I* can afford
    three 250GB disks for a RAID-5 array for my own personal HD video editing
    machine, then somebody doing that sort of thing for a living can afford
    whatever size they need.

    --
    Jeff Rife | "What kind of universe is this where a man can't
    | love his fake wife's mother's best friend?"
    |
    | -- Ned Dorsey, "Ned and Stacey"
    Jeff Rife, Apr 6, 2006
    #25
  6. Rich

    Steve Guest

    On Thu, 6 Apr 2006 06:15:37 -0400, Jeff Rife <> wrote:

    >Steve () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >> >Who cares? This is a *backup* of your DVDs. You have the originals
    >> >safely tucked away, and can re-create the data on the hard drive any
    >> >time you want.

    >>
    >> But it's a lot of effort wasted.

    >
    >It takes less time (and money, if you want bit-for-bit accuracy of all
    >your discs) to copy DVDs to a hard drive than to copy them to DVD-R. And,
    >you really only have to do it once.
    >
    >> This is ofline storage, data shuttles shipped via mail etc. You can't
    >> run everything in Raid pairs when dealing with humongous amounts of
    >> data for full-time timeline editing.

    >
    >The more data you have, and the more critical it is, you can't afford *not*
    >to have some sort of on-line protection like RAID. If *I* can afford
    >three 250GB disks for a RAID-5 array for my own personal HD video editing
    >machine, then somebody doing that sort of thing for a living can afford
    >whatever size they need.


    The drives are shipped across the border, overseas etc. All the
    fellows/ladies the other end can't be expected to all have matching
    Raid setups. I'm not saying there isn't redundant backup, the data
    isn't generally lost, I'm just describing some of the things that have
    happened, all of which DOES support the use of Raid if practical.. One
    is not going to have Raid backups of DVDs, again as you say.

    Brings to mind one (true) story, a fellow was getting back to writing
    an autobiography which he had set aside for several years.. Stupidly
    he was not keeping backups. One day the Maxtor 30 gig in his P3
    failed (you know how bad THEY are) Well, although two or three
    chapters were lost, you know how I recovered his data? The book had
    been started on an original IBM PC (the one predating the XT), with
    the optional ($2000+) Shugart 6 meg drive. Although the computer was
    long gone the massive hard drive had been removed and used as a
    support for a bookshelf (seriously!) I got the original draft of his
    book from that 1982 drive, Using a WD interface in an old XT I had
    (with Edlin in/out commands,) Those IBM files had been converted to
    WordPerfect 5 for his subsequent computer, a long-gone 486. I had to
    convert that antique IBM format to Word. So Hard Drives CAN be used
    for historical backups.

    ... Steve ..
    Steve, Apr 6, 2006
    #26
  7. Rich

    Tim V. Guest

    Stan Brown <> wrote in
    news::

    > Tue, 04 Apr 2006 18:09:56 GMT from Tim V. <tsvemail-
    > >:
    >> I've had a CD distintigrate inside my cdrom. It literally blew into a
    >> million pieces. It was disc #1 of 3, so I was able to get a replacement
    >> by getting product codes off the remaining cd's.

    >
    > Do you mean the manufacturer replaced it? How long had you had it?
    >


    Yes, the mfr replaced it (not the drive, tho). It had been at least
    6mos to a year that we had it. No proof of purchase was necessary
    other than supplying some #'s on the hub of the remaining CD's.


    --
    Tim.

    "Those who give up essential liberties for temporary safety deserve neither
    liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own
    reputation. It is better to be alone than in bad company" - George
    Washington
    Tim V., Apr 13, 2006
    #27
  8. Rich

    Tim V. Guest

    Jeff Rife <> wrote in news:MPG.1e9c91e85ba0751b98a439
    @news.nabs.net:

    > Tim V. () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >> You can also look at it like: at $1 a blank disc, it is still somewhat
    >> cost effective to backup your $6 bargain bin movie.

    >
    > Or, at about $1.33/original disc, you can just put everything onto a hard
    > drive and have all your DVDs instantly available, while the originals sit
    > safely in their boxes.
    >


    Yes, an equally good alternative. Especially if you travel alot.


    --
    Tim.

    "Those who give up essential liberties for temporary safety deserve neither
    liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own
    reputation. It is better to be alone than in bad company" - George
    Washington
    Tim V., Apr 13, 2006
    #28
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