Film cam better than digital for harsh environments?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, May 25, 2010.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

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  2. On Mon, 24 May 2010, Savageduck wrote:

    > On 2010-05-24 17:41:32 -0700, RichA <> said:
    >
    >> http://www.amateurphotographer.co.u..._beats_digital_to_North_Pole_news_298365.html

    >
    > I
    >>

    > was wondering what Peary used in 1908-09. I think that beat Leica film, and
    > digital to the North Pole.
    >

    Don't forget the time Shackleton's Endurance got trapped in the ice. They
    used photographic plates, and somehow managed to keep all or most of them
    throughout the ordeal, that included having the ship locked in the ice
    for a long time, then having to abandon the ship, moving by small boats
    and sleds for a bit, and finally some sailing. The photos are actually
    terribly interesting in themselves, but it's amazing they bothered
    to keep them along under such circumstances.

    Michael
     
    Michael Black, May 25, 2010
    #2
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  3. Michael Black wrote:
    > On Mon, 24 May 2010, Savageduck wrote:
    >
    >> On 2010-05-24 17:41:32 -0700, RichA <> said:
    >>
    >>> http://www.amateurphotographer.co.u..._beats_digital_to_North_Pole_news_298365.html
    >>>

    >>
    >> I
    >>>

    >> was wondering what Peary used in 1908-09. I think that beat Leica
    >> film, and digital to the North Pole.
    >>

    > Don't forget the time Shackleton's Endurance got trapped in the ice. They
    > used photographic plates, and somehow managed to keep all or most of them
    > throughout the ordeal, that included having the ship locked in the ice
    > for a long time, then having to abandon the ship, moving by small boats
    > and sleds for a bit, and finally some sailing. The photos are actually
    > terribly interesting in themselves, but it's amazing they bothered
    > to keep them along under such circumstances.


    Yes, it's amazing that anyone or anything survived that ordeal. After
    reading the book, it took four days for me to thaw out, and I was in the
    Desert at the time.....

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, May 25, 2010
    #3
  4. RichA

    Rich Guest

    On May 25, 3:54 am, bugbear <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    > RichA wrote:
    > >http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/news/Leica_film_camera_beats_dig...

    >
    > 'These low temperatures cause everything to shrink - autofocus lenses become too tight and have to be focused manually and aperture leafs often jam.
    >
    > This applies to any camera with aperture leafs and autofocus.
    > His comment about batteries also applies to any camera with a battery.
    >
    > So his comments appear directly applicable to any such camera
    > e.g. Canon EOS 1, not known for being digital.
    >
    >     BugBear


    But you can shoot manual cameras anytime, no power needed. All you
    need to do is estimate exposure, film latitude being pretty good these
    days.
     
    Rich, May 25, 2010
    #4
  5. On Tue, 25 May 2010, Rich wrote:

    > On May 25, 3:54 am, bugbear <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >> RichA wrote:
    >>> http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/news/Leica_film_camera_beats_dig...

    >>
    >> 'These low temperatures cause everything to shrink - autofocus lenses become too tight and have to be focused manually and aperture leafs often jam.
    >>
    >> This applies to any camera with aperture leafs and autofocus.
    >> His comment about batteries also applies to any camera with a battery.
    >>
    >> So his comments appear directly applicable to any such camera
    >> e.g. Canon EOS 1, not known for being digital.
    >>
    >>     BugBear

    >
    > But you can shoot manual cameras anytime, no power needed. All you
    > need to do is estimate exposure, film latitude being pretty good these
    > days.
    >

    What about the mechanical parts? If they are lubricated, the lubrication
    may freeze, and the camera won't work. Oddly, despite most digital
    cameras having motorized zoom, they don't have much else in the way
    of mechanical parts.

    Note that if you read about antarctic exploration, if they were using
    motorized transport, they'd start the day by using a blowtorch on
    the tractors, to warm them up so they can start.

    Michael
     
    Michael Black, May 25, 2010
    #5
  6. RichA

    Rich Guest

    On May 25, 2:36 pm, (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:
    > Rich <> wrote:
    > >On May 25, 3:54 am, bugbear <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    > >> RichA wrote:
    > >> >http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/news/Leica_film_camera_beats_dig....

    >
    > >> 'These low temperatures cause everything to shrink - autofocus lenses become too tight and have to be focused manually and aperture leafs often jam.

    >
    > >> This applies to any camera with aperture leafs and autofocus.
    > >> His comment about batteries also applies to any camera with a battery.

    >
    > >> So his comments appear directly applicable to any such camera
    > >> e.g. Canon EOS 1, not known for being digital.

    >
    > >>     BugBear

    >
    > >But you can shoot manual cameras anytime, no power needed.  All you
    > >need to do is estimate exposure, film latitude being pretty good these
    > >days.

    >
    > Ha ha, that's hilarious.  Film latitude isn't that good,
    > and in particular if you shoot slides.


    Why shoot slides when negative film is so good today? Also, if as a
    photographer you can't estimate exposure of a scene to within a stop,
    you are no photographer.
    >
    > Regardless, the no power needed is not the significance
    > of the cited article.  The fellow was claiming that film
    > is better at -40 degrees.  Let me tell you a secret:
    > winding film at -40 is quite often a fatal action.  You
    > *loose* everything unless you have a dark bag with you
    > to remove the film from the camera.


    He apparently managed.
     
    Rich, May 26, 2010
    #6
  7. Michael Black <> wrote:

    > Don't forget the time Shackleton's Endurance got trapped in the ice. They
    > used photographic plates,


    Among other things like film.

    > and somehow managed to keep all or most of them
    > throughout the ordeal,


    They *smashed* all but the best 100 or so plates on abandoning
    the sinking Endurance (fetching the plates out of a meter of
    seawater first).

    > The photos are actually
    > terribly interesting in themselves, but it's amazing they bothered
    > to keep them along under such circumstances.


    The photogapher was a dedicated professional and photos mean
    income.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, May 30, 2010
    #7
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