Fill in vs. Slow synchro?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Christian Drewing, Nov 15, 2006.

  1. I am new to digital compact cameras (my flagship is a Rebel XT but I
    won a Samsung NV10 at a contest) and the manual from Samsung is good,
    but lousy in relation to the built in flash.

    It has two modes that I don't understand.

    What is "Slow Synchro" and what is "Fill In"? At least I can presume
    what Fill In means, but I am not sure, because there is nothing about
    the flash modes of the camera in the manual.

    Unfortunately, I found nothing explaining on the Net.

    Perhaps some expert can help me. And I am really embarassed... 16 years
    of photography experience worth nothing in this topic ;-/

    Regards, Chris
    Christian Drewing, Nov 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Christian Drewing

    jeremy Guest

    "Christian Drewing" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I am new to digital compact cameras (my flagship is a Rebel XT but I
    > won a Samsung NV10 at a contest) and the manual from Samsung is good,
    > but lousy in relation to the built in flash.
    >
    > It has two modes that I don't understand.
    >
    > What is "Slow Synchro" and what is "Fill In"? At least I can presume
    > what Fill In means, but I am not sure, because there is nothing about
    > the flash modes of the camera in the manual.
    >



    "Fill-In" flash is used when the subject is in the shadows (like under a
    tree on a sunny day) and there is a bright background. The camera's meter
    tends to be fooled, exposing for the bright background, and the main subject
    often appears silhouetted. Fill-in flash provides just a small amount of
    light, to brighten-up the subject.

    Slow Synchro is typically useful at twilight or night scenes. Here the
    backgrounds are dark, not light as with fill-in situations. The use of
    flash with dark backgrounds causes the subjects to be properly lighted, but
    they are surrounded by darkness. With slow synchro, the shutter speed is
    slowed-down, to let the shutter take in more of the dim light from the
    background, and the flash burst is reduced so as not to overwhelm the main
    subject. This offers a better balance between main subject and background,
    allowing some of the dimly-lighted background elements to appear in the
    image.

    Slow synchro often is optimized by using a tripod, as the slower shutter
    speed makes the camera more susceptible to camera shake if it is handheld.
    Also, digital cameras may automatically increase the ISO speed during such
    shots, and that may result in increased noise. Even so, the slow synchro
    shots are generally more pleasing, because the backgrounds are visible, as
    opposed to everything surrounding the main subject being black.
    jeremy, Nov 15, 2006
    #2
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