Fiber link between offices, recommendation?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Marv, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. Marv

    Marv Guest

    Hello,

    I was wondering if someone here could point me in the right direction
    as I'm not real familiar with fiber technology.

    My company has a campus with several buildings. For the purpose of
    telecommunications, we have run a 12 strand fiber cable from one
    building to another. Supposedly, 6 strands will be used for the actual
    voice lines. What would I need in the way of Cisco equipment (lowest
    cost) to make a network connection from one side to another. I think
    you can use switches with WIC transceivers? But can you use two 2600
    routers or lower to facilitate this?

    Thanks for any help you can give.

    Max
     
    Marv, Dec 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    Marv <> wrote:
    :I was wondering if someone here could point me in the right direction
    :as I'm not real familiar with fiber technology.

    :My company has a campus with several buildings. For the purpose of
    :telecommunications, we have run a 12 strand fiber cable from one
    :building to another. Supposedly, 6 strands will be used for the actual
    :voice lines. What would I need in the way of Cisco equipment (lowest
    :cost) to make a network connection from one side to another. I think
    :you can use switches with WIC transceivers? But can you use two 2600
    :routers or lower to facilitate this?

    What speed do you want the fibres to be run at? How long are
    the fibre runs? Should each fibre terminate on an independant
    device, or do you need to bond several together for load balancing
    or improved throughput? Do the terminating devices need to be
    doing some kind of redundancy so that if one device fails,
    the other devices should take over? Do the terminating devices
    need to be doing some kind of redundancy so that if one fibre
    fails, the other fibres should take over? Are the data terminating
    devices the same devices that are going to be used to handle the
    voice channels? Do you need QoS (Quality of Service)? Do you need
    802.1Q VLANs? Are these fibres single-mode or multi-mode?
    When you say 'strand' is each strand an individual fibre or
    a fibre pair? What kind of traffic is expected -- packets per
    second, packet size profile?


    If you want lowest cost, what you should do is get a no-name
    $US40 multi-port hub for each end, and get a bunch of used
    10 Mb fibre to ethernet media convertors (you can probably find
    people practically giving them away), connect everything up, and
    let the network administrator worry about all the problems.

    [We can deduce that you aren't the network administrator by the use of
    the word 'supposedly', and by your asking for the 'lowest cost'
    right off instead of specifying the features the link needs.]
    --
    "Mathematics? I speak it like a native." -- Spike Milligan
     
    Walter Roberson, Dec 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Marv

    Scooby Guest

    "Walter Roberson" <-cnrc.gc.ca> wrote in message
    news:brcs5k$3p1$...
    > In article <>,
    > Marv <> wrote:
    > :I was wondering if someone here could point me in the right direction
    > :as I'm not real familiar with fiber technology.
    >
    > :My company has a campus with several buildings. For the purpose of
    > :telecommunications, we have run a 12 strand fiber cable from one
    > :building to another. Supposedly, 6 strands will be used for the actual
    > :voice lines. What would I need in the way of Cisco equipment (lowest
    > :cost) to make a network connection from one side to another. I think
    > :you can use switches with WIC transceivers? But can you use two 2600
    > :routers or lower to facilitate this?
    >
    > What speed do you want the fibres to be run at? How long are
    > the fibre runs? Should each fibre terminate on an independant
    > device, or do you need to bond several together for load balancing
    > or improved throughput? Do the terminating devices need to be
    > doing some kind of redundancy so that if one device fails,
    > the other devices should take over? Do the terminating devices
    > need to be doing some kind of redundancy so that if one fibre
    > fails, the other fibres should take over? Are the data terminating
    > devices the same devices that are going to be used to handle the
    > voice channels? Do you need QoS (Quality of Service)? Do you need
    > 802.1Q VLANs? Are these fibres single-mode or multi-mode?
    > When you say 'strand' is each strand an individual fibre or
    > a fibre pair? What kind of traffic is expected -- packets per
    > second, packet size profile?
    >
    >
    > If you want lowest cost, what you should do is get a no-name
    > $US40 multi-port hub for each end, and get a bunch of used
    > 10 Mb fibre to ethernet media convertors (you can probably find
    > people practically giving them away), connect everything up, and
    > let the network administrator worry about all the problems.
    >
    > [We can deduce that you aren't the network administrator by the use of
    > the word 'supposedly', and by your asking for the 'lowest cost'
    > right off instead of specifying the features the link needs.]
    > --
    > "Mathematics? I speak it like a native." -- Spike Milligan


    All good follow up questions to be considered. I think if you want to cut
    costs, though, you should still use switches. You can get unmananged
    switches pretty cheap these days - not much more than a hub. And, then use
    the fiber/ethernet transceivers. There are 100Mb versions available too for
    a reasonable amount.

    If you are looking for a decent setup, look for switches with a fiber module
    in them. Or switches that have a place to plug one in. The Cisco 3550's
    are layer 3 that will do pretty much everything you need - switching, vlans,
    trunking, routing... If you need more horse power, the 3750 is a better
    option. For just switching, you can look at the 2950's. Some of the 2950's
    only run the standard image (vs. Enhanced) and lack some features such as
    RSTP. So, take a close look at the specs before buying. Same subnet, you
    can just use a 2950 on each end, internal or external fiber/ethernet
    transceivers should work fine. Different subnets, by the time you get both
    a switch and a router, the 3550 makes more sense, unless you need WAN cards.

    For redundancy, you can either use multiple pairs to each building and let
    spanning tree do the failover (or use etherchannel). Once you get to more
    buildings, you can save number of pair/hardware used by connecting building
    A to B, B to C and C back to A rather than have multiple runs to each
    building.
     
    Scooby, Dec 12, 2003
    #3
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