feeling really old

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by - Bobb -, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. - Bobb -

    - Bobb - Guest

    At pizza shop and owner was asking door alarm installer of " ding-dong
    type buzzer" if it could make a different tone if person exiting or
    entering and installer said "no" - just that 'someone went thru the
    doorway".

    As I was leaving, in my head all I could hear was ( from
    punch-card-reader days - with two rows of LED's):
    " gating diode #1 goes dark - light check"
    " gating diode #2 goes dark - dark check"

    THAT would show if going in or out - which LED went dark first ?!
    Apparently he wasn't around in "card reader days".

    WOW did I feel old . I'm over it now ( ;-> )
    - Bobb -, Aug 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. - Bobb -

    Jimbo Guest

    "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > At pizza shop and owner was asking door alarm installer of " ding-dong
    > type buzzer" if it could make a different tone if person exiting or
    > entering and installer said "no" - just that 'someone went thru the
    > doorway".
    >
    > As I was leaving, in my head all I could hear was ( from
    > punch-card-reader days - with two rows of LED's):
    > " gating diode #1 goes dark - light check"
    > " gating diode #2 goes dark - dark check"
    >
    > THAT would show if going in or out - which LED went dark first ?!
    > Apparently he wasn't around in "card reader days".
    >
    > WOW did I feel old . I'm over it now ( ;-> )
    >


    The first computer that I ever worked on in a professional manner was an old
    octal system that had about 200 pounds of wires inside it. There was a door
    on one side so you could walk inside of it to do repairs. I installed it's
    first ever permenant data storage unit, a portable cassette deck from Kmart
    modified so the computers programming could be stored on a cassette. I'm
    feeling kinda old too.
    Jimbo, Aug 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. "Jimbo" <> wrote in message
    news:8rwxi.84852$...
    >
    > "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> At pizza shop and owner was asking door alarm installer of " ding-dong
    >> type buzzer" if it could make a different tone if person exiting or
    >> entering and installer said "no" - just that 'someone went thru the
    >> doorway".
    >>
    >> As I was leaving, in my head all I could hear was ( from
    >> punch-card-reader days - with two rows of LED's):
    >> " gating diode #1 goes dark - light check"
    >> " gating diode #2 goes dark - dark check"
    >>
    >> THAT would show if going in or out - which LED went dark first ?!
    >> Apparently he wasn't around in "card reader days".
    >>
    >> WOW did I feel old . I'm over it now ( ;-> )
    >>

    >
    > The first computer that I ever worked on in a professional manner was an
    > old octal system that had about 200 pounds of wires inside it. There was a
    > door on one side so you could walk inside of it to do repairs. I installed
    > it's first ever permenant data storage unit, a portable cassette deck from
    > Kmart modified so the computers programming could be stored on a cassette.
    > I'm feeling kinda old too.
    >


    I remember my first home computer, cost £300, had 16k of RAM, a built-in
    tape cassette drive, and used a TV set as a monitor, display was monochrome.
    It was Z80 based, and was (literally) a Chinese copy of the Tandy TRS80 (not
    in physical appearance, but electronically). It included BASIC high-level
    programming language on ROM, written by some company called 'Microsoft'.
    £300 then (around 1980) was a LOT of cash. The machine was called the
    'Video Genie', anyone remember them?

    Just two or three years later, my Sinclair Spectrum+ cost less than £100 and
    had colour graphics (but used a separate cassette player) and an amazing 48k
    of RAM. Then I went on to a rare machine called a 'Sam Coupe', made by a
    tiny firm in Swansea, but this actually had floppy *disc* drives! Came with
    250k of RAM, which was upgradable to half a Megabyte (an upgrade I did
    install).

    Around that time I went to a new department at work, and was bowled over to
    hear that the Intel PC I would be working on (and programming in Intel PLM
    language, as well as FORTRAN) had a staggering 20 Megabytes space on the
    hard drive! I couldn't imagine how anyone could fill up 20 Mbytes....

    The year was around 1987. Boy, how things have changed in just 20 years.
    If a week is a long time in politics, it seems even longer in electronics!

    Tim.
    . . . . Timothy . . . . ., Aug 18, 2007
    #3
  4. - Bobb -

    Ivan Guest

    " . . . . Timothy . . . . ." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Jimbo" <> wrote in message
    > news:8rwxi.84852$...
    >>
    >> "- Bobb -" <bobb@noemail.123> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>
    >>> At pizza shop and owner was asking door alarm installer of " ding-dong
    >>> type buzzer" if it could make a different tone if person exiting or
    >>> entering and installer said "no" - just that 'someone went thru the
    >>> doorway".
    >>>
    >>> As I was leaving, in my head all I could hear was ( from
    >>> punch-card-reader days - with two rows of LED's):
    >>> " gating diode #1 goes dark - light check"
    >>> " gating diode #2 goes dark - dark check"
    >>>
    >>> THAT would show if going in or out - which LED went dark first ?!
    >>> Apparently he wasn't around in "card reader days".
    >>>
    >>> WOW did I feel old . I'm over it now ( ;-> )
    >>>

    >>
    >> The first computer that I ever worked on in a professional manner was an
    >> old octal system that had about 200 pounds of wires inside it. There was
    >> a door on one side so you could walk inside of it to do repairs. I
    >> installed it's first ever permenant data storage unit, a portable
    >> cassette deck from Kmart modified so the computers programming could be
    >> stored on a cassette. I'm feeling kinda old too.
    >>

    >
    > I remember my first home computer, cost £300, had 16k of RAM, a built-in
    > tape cassette drive, and used a TV set as a monitor, display was
    > monochrome. It was Z80 based, and was (literally) a Chinese copy of the
    > Tandy TRS80 (not in physical appearance, but electronically). It included
    > BASIC high-level programming language on ROM, written by some company
    > called 'Microsoft'. £300 then (around 1980) was a LOT of cash. The
    > machine was called the 'Video Genie', anyone remember them?
    >
    > Just two or three years later, my Sinclair Spectrum+ cost less than £100
    > and had colour graphics (but used a separate cassette player) and an
    > amazing 48k of RAM. Then I went on to a rare machine called a 'Sam
    > Coupe', made by a tiny firm in Swansea, but this actually had floppy
    > *disc* drives! Came with 250k of RAM, which was upgradable to half a
    > Megabyte (an upgrade I did install).
    >
    > Around that time I went to a new department at work, and was bowled over
    > to hear that the Intel PC I would be working on (and programming in Intel
    > PLM language, as well as FORTRAN) had a staggering 20 Megabytes space on
    > the hard drive! I couldn't imagine how anyone could fill up 20 Mbytes....
    >
    > The year was around 1987. Boy, how things have changed in just 20 years.
    > If a week is a long time in politics, it seems even longer in electronics!
    >


    Yup, thinking about remortgaging the house for a 1 MB strip of RAM, spending
    hours typing in all that code and the wobbly 16K extended RAM pack on the
    back of the ZX 81 deciding to wobble and wipe out everything!

    The 9.6 K Hayes modem and my first 'double speed' CD ROM drive, which cost a
    staggering £199.99 and it's now possible to purchase a reasonably decent DVD
    burner for less than £19.00.. I think there was a much greater thrill of
    achievement back then, which when one actually comes to think about it
    wasn't really 'that' long ago!



    > Tim.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Ivan, Aug 19, 2007
    #4
  5. - Bobb -

    Les Hemmings Guest

    Ivan wrote:
    >>>

    > Yup, thinking about remortgaging the house for a 1 MB strip of RAM,
    > spending hours typing in all that code and the wobbly 16K extended
    > RAM pack on the back of the ZX 81 deciding to wobble and wipe out
    > everything!
    > The 9.6 K Hayes modem and my first 'double speed' CD ROM drive, which
    > cost a staggering £199.99 and it's now possible to purchase a
    > reasonably decent DVD burner for less than £19.00.. I think there was
    > a much greater thrill of achievement back then, which when one
    > actually comes to think about it wasn't really 'that' long ago!
    >
    >
    >
    >> Tim.


    Yep... Amstrad 64k. Tape storage, dedicated monitor (gasp!) All the
    programming i did in Locomotive Basic for quite a few years was stored on
    one 120min cassette.

    After a whole day plugging in a prog to itterate the mandelbrot set I left
    it running overnight. The next morning, with about 6 minutes till the set
    was finished the electric meter went. Forgot to put a 50p in the night
    before! Bugger!

    But whole days and nights playing "Elite" with one person on the keyboard
    and one on the joystick with the Blue Danube beeping away in the
    background... Have never since enjoyed a game so much.

    Jet Set Willy anyone?

    Les


    --
    Remove Frontal Lobes to reply direct.

    "These people believe the souls of fried space aliens inhabit their
    bodies and hold soup cans to get rid of them. I should care what they
    think?"...Valerie Emmanuel

    Les Hemmings a.a #2251 SA
    Les Hemmings, Aug 19, 2007
    #5
  6. - Bobb -

    Ivan Guest

    "Les Hemmings" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ivan wrote:
    >>>>

    >> Yup, thinking about remortgaging the house for a 1 MB strip of RAM,
    >> spending hours typing in all that code and the wobbly 16K extended
    >> RAM pack on the back of the ZX 81 deciding to wobble and wipe out
    >> everything!
    >> The 9.6 K Hayes modem and my first 'double speed' CD ROM drive, which
    >> cost a staggering £199.99 and it's now possible to purchase a
    >> reasonably decent DVD burner for less than £19.00.. I think there was
    >> a much greater thrill of achievement back then, which when one
    >> actually comes to think about it wasn't really 'that' long ago!
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Tim.

    >
    > Yep... Amstrad 64k. Tape storage, dedicated monitor (gasp!) All the
    > programming i did in Locomotive Basic for quite a few years was stored on
    > one 120min cassette.
    >
    > After a whole day plugging in a prog to itterate the mandelbrot set I left
    > it running overnight. The next morning, with about 6 minutes till the set
    > was finished the electric meter went. Forgot to put a 50p in the night
    > before! Bugger!
    >
    > But whole days and nights playing "Elite" with one person on the keyboard
    > and one on the joystick with the Blue Danube beeping away in the
    > background... Have never since enjoyed a game so much.
    >


    Up in the loft, from memory I'm pretty certain that I've still got a ZX81, a
    Spectrum, a BBC and a Commodore (the model which hardly any company bothered
    to make any games for!) plus a whole plastic crate full of old games on
    tapes and various sized floppies, all of it destined for the tip when I can
    pluck up enough incentive get up there and sort it all out!


    > Jet Set Willy anyone?
    >
    > Les
    >
    >
    > --
    > Remove Frontal Lobes to reply direct.
    >
    > "These people believe the souls of fried space aliens inhabit their
    > bodies and hold soup cans to get rid of them. I should care what they
    > think?"...Valerie Emmanuel
    >
    > Les Hemmings a.a #2251 SA
    >
    >
    >
    Ivan, Aug 19, 2007
    #6
  7. - Bobb -

    tony sayer Guest

    >Up in the loft, from memory I'm pretty certain that I've still got a ZX81, a
    >Spectrum, a BBC and a Commodore (the model which hardly any company bothered
    >to make any games for!) plus a whole plastic crate full of old games on
    >tapes and various sized floppies, all of it destined for the tip when I can
    >pluck up enough incentive get up there and sort it all out!
    >
    >



    Ebay it;)...

    Its amazing what people will pay for!...
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Aug 19, 2007
    #7
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