Feeling Lucky. . .

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Tony Sperling, May 23, 2006.

  1. Hi!

    I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this ordeal.
    My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that one.
    Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was all quite
    uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this simple operation can
    muster the adrenaline???


    Tony. . .
     
    Tony Sperling, May 23, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Now see, that's something I tend to stay on top of, and I haven't had a
    problem in so many years that I no longer get the adrenaline up. OTOH, it
    is always a good idea to know where that BIOS reset jumper is on your mobo.
    :)

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc

    Tony Sperling wrote:
    > Hi!
    >
    > I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this ordeal.
    > My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that one.
    > Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was all
    > quite uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this simple
    > operation can muster the adrenaline???
    >
    >
    > Tony. . .
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, May 23, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Tony:
    Flashing your mobo's BIOS is one of the most stressing things in the world.
    Time seems to freeze while the progress bar slowly advances, waiting for a
    lurking power outage.
    Don't know why "shrinks" don't mention this issue.
    They usually quote losing a job, moving to a new house as topmost causes for
    stress.
    I'd vote for BIOS flashing first.
    Luckily flashing from within Windows is a lotta faster than the floppy thing.
    I also flash my DVD and CD drives, way less stressing.
    Also flashed successfully my HP iPAQ Pocket PC once.
    Oh, man! THAT was adrenaline!
    Carlos

    "Tony Sperling" wrote:

    > Hi!
    >
    > I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this ordeal.
    > My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that one.
    > Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was all quite
    > uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this simple operation can
    > muster the adrenaline???
    >
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, May 23, 2006
    #3
  4. Tony Sperling

    Larry Hodges Guest

    On two separate occasions using SuperMicro mobos, I had to order a new BIOS
    chip from them because the flash failed. And resetting the mobo didn't fix
    it.


    "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Now see, that's something I tend to stay on top of, and I haven't had a
    > problem in so many years that I no longer get the adrenaline up. OTOH, it
    > is always a good idea to know where that BIOS reset jumper is on your
    > mobo. :)
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    > http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc
    >
    > Tony Sperling wrote:
    >> Hi!
    >>
    >> I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this
    >> ordeal.
    >> My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that one.
    >> Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was all
    >> quite uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this simple
    >> operation can muster the adrenaline???
    >>
    >>
    >> Tony. . .

    >
    >
     
    Larry Hodges, May 23, 2006
    #4
  5. Ouch. Makes my ASUS experience feel a lot better! Maybe I've been spoiled.
    But I admit - I always keep a baseline version on a bootable CD that has the
    flash utility on it... JIC.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc

    Larry Hodges wrote:
    > On two separate occasions using SuperMicro mobos, I had to order a new
    > BIOS chip from them because the flash failed. And resetting the mobo
    > didn't fix it.
    >
    >
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Now see, that's something I tend to stay on top of, and I haven't had a
    >> problem in so many years that I no longer get the adrenaline up. OTOH,
    >> it is always a good idea to know where that BIOS reset jumper is on your
    >> mobo. :)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >> http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc
    >>
    >> Tony Sperling wrote:
    >>> Hi!
    >>>
    >>> I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this
    >>> ordeal.
    >>> My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that
    >>> one. Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was
    >>> all quite uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this simple
    >>> operation can muster the adrenaline???
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Tony. . .
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, May 23, 2006
    #5
  6. To Charlie: Yes, I almost remember that feeling - I must have been one of
    the first of a handfull of people here in old DK that flashed anything (
    except for the odd exhibitionist ), I was a regular reader of PC Mag. at the
    time and knew about ZIF sockets and Flashable chips, two items I desperatly
    wanted for my next machine and everywhere I asked about it no-one had ever
    heard of the concepts. I then bumped into a fellow that built me a machine
    with a Chinese Quantum board fresh with all the new stuff ( 486 DX50), and
    it didn't take long before I had found a reason to try that flashing stuff.

    At least 6 months then passed before ZIF and Flash became buzzwords here.
    But over all, I have to say that I have followed the producers advice not to
    fix it if it ain't broke.


    To Carlos: Yes, we do understand each other. No question about that.
    However doing it from Windows? I just don't know - I think I would feel like
    if they turned up one day and began to exchange the entire foundation of the
    house with everybody still inside. I know they could probably do it, but I
    would quite probably feel a bit 'icky' to.

    I never flashed any of my cards, I have been on the look-out for something
    but they seem to only issue those fixes when there are serious bugs. The
    periferals are often targeted at one-task only, they work or not, did
    flashing help you any there?

    Personally, I had an unexpected bonus. Some time ago I downloaded the
    processor dashboard utility from AMD, it installed allright but didn't
    launch protesting that it lacked some support. This update, I noticed
    mentioned something about C&Q and when I was up and running again I fired up
    the dashboard and it worked right away, funny little thing, the dashboard.
    Then I noticed that the CPU temp had fallen by almost ten degrees, which I
    understand is meaning that all the time C&Q wasn't working, although Sandra
    listed it as active - well, it was set to active in the BIOS of course!

    I also tried installing the well known SpeedFan utility once, which also
    didn't ever worked for me, I wonder if that is fixed as well? That is next
    on the list. Then if temp stays put, maybe I try and jack up the clock just
    a notch?


    Good day and/or night, all!

    Tony. . .
     
    Tony Sperling, May 23, 2006
    #6
  7. Charlie:
    BIOS reset jumper just resets BIOS data, not firmware.
    So, if the firmware (program) gets screwed up you are in trouble.
    Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that keeps a
    small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS image.
    I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive, turning
    on the machine and a little of praying.
    Carlos
    "Charlie Russel - MVP" wrote:

    > Ouch. Makes my ASUS experience feel a lot better! Maybe I've been spoiled.
    > But I admit - I always keep a baseline version on a bootable CD that has the
    > flash utility on it... JIC.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    > http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc
    >
    > Larry Hodges wrote:
    > > On two separate occasions using SuperMicro mobos, I had to order a new
    > > BIOS chip from them because the flash failed. And resetting the mobo
    > > didn't fix it.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > > news:%...
    > >> Now see, that's something I tend to stay on top of, and I haven't had a
    > >> problem in so many years that I no longer get the adrenaline up. OTOH,
    > >> it is always a good idea to know where that BIOS reset jumper is on your
    > >> mobo. :)
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Charlie.
    > >> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    > >> http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc
    > >>
    > >> Tony Sperling wrote:
    > >>> Hi!
    > >>>
    > >>> I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this
    > >>> ordeal.
    > >>> My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that
    > >>> one. Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was
    > >>> all quite uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this simple
    > >>> operation can muster the adrenaline???
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> Tony. . .

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, May 23, 2006
    #7
  8. Tony:
    Flashing from within Windows with ASUS utilities is fast and reliable.
    Give it a try (at your own risk) and you'll notice a tenfold speed increase
    as compared to floppy.
    I do it for mobos and CD/DVD burners.
    Flashing is useful for burner drives because afther that they recognize more
    recordable media as it is released in the market.
    That info is included in the release notes of the firmware.
    At least ASUS does so.
    Carlos
    P.S.: Good afternoon on my side
    "Tony Sperling" wrote:

    > To Charlie: Yes, I almost remember that feeling - I must have been one of
    > the first of a handfull of people here in old DK that flashed anything (
    > except for the odd exhibitionist ), I was a regular reader of PC Mag. at the
    > time and knew about ZIF sockets and Flashable chips, two items I desperatly
    > wanted for my next machine and everywhere I asked about it no-one had ever
    > heard of the concepts. I then bumped into a fellow that built me a machine
    > with a Chinese Quantum board fresh with all the new stuff ( 486 DX50), and
    > it didn't take long before I had found a reason to try that flashing stuff.
    >
    > At least 6 months then passed before ZIF and Flash became buzzwords here.
    > But over all, I have to say that I have followed the producers advice not to
    > fix it if it ain't broke.
    >
    >
    > To Carlos: Yes, we do understand each other. No question about that.
    > However doing it from Windows? I just don't know - I think I would feel like
    > if they turned up one day and began to exchange the entire foundation of the
    > house with everybody still inside. I know they could probably do it, but I
    > would quite probably feel a bit 'icky' to.
    >
    > I never flashed any of my cards, I have been on the look-out for something
    > but they seem to only issue those fixes when there are serious bugs. The
    > periferals are often targeted at one-task only, they work or not, did
    > flashing help you any there?
    >
    > Personally, I had an unexpected bonus. Some time ago I downloaded the
    > processor dashboard utility from AMD, it installed allright but didn't
    > launch protesting that it lacked some support. This update, I noticed
    > mentioned something about C&Q and when I was up and running again I fired up
    > the dashboard and it worked right away, funny little thing, the dashboard.
    > Then I noticed that the CPU temp had fallen by almost ten degrees, which I
    > understand is meaning that all the time C&Q wasn't working, although Sandra
    > listed it as active - well, it was set to active in the BIOS of course!
    >
    > I also tried installing the well known SpeedFan utility once, which also
    > didn't ever worked for me, I wonder if that is fixed as well? That is next
    > on the list. Then if temp stays put, maybe I try and jack up the clock just
    > a notch?
    >
    >
    > Good day and/or night, all!
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, May 23, 2006
    #8
  9. Now that the AM2 is out, one day I will need to have a new machine and I had
    planned on making it an ASUS - it will be so expensive, though, that I'll
    need to put it in a safe over night, so I will probably invest in a 939 as a
    go-between. No reason that couldn't be an ASUS as well.

    Thanks.

    Tony. . .


    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tony:
    > Flashing from within Windows with ASUS utilities is fast and reliable.
    > Give it a try (at your own risk) and you'll notice a tenfold speed
    > increase
    > as compared to floppy.
    > I do it for mobos and CD/DVD burners.
    > Flashing is useful for burner drives because afther that they recognize
    > more
    > recordable media as it is released in the market.
    > That info is included in the release notes of the firmware.
    > At least ASUS does so.
    > Carlos
    > P.S.: Good afternoon on my side
    > "Tony Sperling" wrote:
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, May 23, 2006
    #9
  10. correct, it will only reset the data, not recover from a bad image. But that
    can still get you out of a lot of problems. And, as you point out, having
    the ASUS and other BIOS with a non-writeable portion makes it pretty
    straightforward to recover. But frankly, I haven't had to worry about it in
    a long time.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc

    Carlos wrote:
    > Charlie:
    > BIOS reset jumper just resets BIOS data, not firmware.
    > So, if the firmware (program) gets screwed up you are in trouble.
    > Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that keeps a
    > small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    > All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    > image. I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the
    > drive, turning on the machine and a little of praying.
    > Carlos
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" wrote:
    >
    >> Ouch. Makes my ASUS experience feel a lot better! Maybe I've been
    >> spoiled. But I admit - I always keep a baseline version on a bootable CD
    >> that has the flash utility on it... JIC.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >> http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc
    >>
    >> Larry Hodges wrote:
    >>> On two separate occasions using SuperMicro mobos, I had to order a new
    >>> BIOS chip from them because the flash failed. And resetting the mobo
    >>> didn't fix it.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in
    >>> message news:%...
    >>>> Now see, that's something I tend to stay on top of, and I haven't had a
    >>>> problem in so many years that I no longer get the adrenaline up. OTOH,
    >>>> it is always a good idea to know where that BIOS reset jumper is on
    >>>> your mobo. :)
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Charlie.
    >>>> http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    >>>> http://download.microsoft.com/downl..._XP_Professional_x64_Edition_Right_for_Me.doc
    >>>>
    >>>> Tony Sperling wrote:
    >>>>> Hi!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I just flashed my BIOS - it's been years since I went through this
    >>>>> ordeal.
    >>>>> My machines have mostly been quite well behaved,so have skipped that
    >>>>> one. Now I thought it was about time (4 upgrades at once!), and it was
    >>>>> all quite uneventfull - well, painless, at least. Funny how this
    >>>>> simple operation can muster the adrenaline???
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Tony. . .
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, May 23, 2006
    #10
  11. Tony Sperling

    DP Guest

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that keeps a
    > small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    > All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    > image.
    > I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    > turning
    > on the machine and a little of praying.



    Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would a bios
    image on a CD work?
    Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?

    I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to use,
    but I thought I'd better ask.
     
    DP, May 24, 2006
    #11
  12. Tony Sperling

    Rick Guest

    That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in the
    user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos stated,
    the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    specific key combinations.

    DP wrote:
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that keeps a
    >> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    >> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    >> image.
    >> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    >> turning
    >> on the machine and a little of praying.

    >
    >
    > Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would a bios
    > image on a CD work?
    > Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    >
    > I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to use,
    > but I thought I'd better ask.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Rick, May 24, 2006
    #12
  13. Rick:
    Thanks for your supporting answer.
    The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and do the
    recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the BIOS.
    Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now, there
    is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    alternative.
    It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    Carlos

    "Rick" wrote:

    > That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    > the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in the
    > user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos stated,
    > the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    > image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    > specific key combinations.
    >
    > DP wrote:
    > > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that keeps a
    > >> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    > >> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    > >> image.
    > >> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    > >> turning
    > >> on the machine and a little of praying.

    > >
    > >
    > > Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would a bios
    > > image on a CD work?
    > > Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    > >
    > > I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to use,
    > > but I thought I'd better ask.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, May 24, 2006
    #13
  14. Tony Sperling

    John Barnes Guest

    I have updated my ASUS BIOS via a bootable CD(RW)
    To update the BIOS via floppy, you need the boot files and the ASUS update
    program awdflash

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Rick:
    > Thanks for your supporting answer.
    > The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    > Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and do
    > the
    > recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the
    > BIOS.
    > Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now, there
    > is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    > alternative.
    > It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    > Carlos
    >
    > "Rick" wrote:
    >
    >> That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    >> the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in the
    >> user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos stated,
    >> the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    >> image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    >> specific key combinations.
    >>
    >> DP wrote:
    >> > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...
    >> >> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that
    >> >> keeps a
    >> >> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    >> >> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    >> >> image.
    >> >> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    >> >> turning
    >> >> on the machine and a little of praying.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would a
    >> > bios
    >> > image on a CD work?
    >> > Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    >> >
    >> > I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to
    >> > use,
    >> > but I thought I'd better ask.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
     
    John Barnes, May 24, 2006
    #14
  15. John:
    It is also possible to update the BIOS with a non-bootable floppy by
    pressing Alt-F2 during the boot sequence.
    There is no need for the awdflash.exe program to reside in the floppy if you
    use this method.
    Just the BIOS file.
    Carlos

    "John Barnes" wrote:

    > I have updated my ASUS BIOS via a bootable CD(RW)
    > To update the BIOS via floppy, you need the boot files and the ASUS update
    > program awdflash
    >
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Rick:
    > > Thanks for your supporting answer.
    > > The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    > > Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and do
    > > the
    > > recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the
    > > BIOS.
    > > Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now, there
    > > is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    > > alternative.
    > > It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    > > Carlos
    > >
    > > "Rick" wrote:
    > >
    > >> That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    > >> the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in the
    > >> user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos stated,
    > >> the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    > >> image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    > >> specific key combinations.
    > >>
    > >> DP wrote:
    > >> > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > >> > news:...
    > >> >> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that
    > >> >> keeps a
    > >> >> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    > >> >> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    > >> >> image.
    > >> >> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    > >> >> turning
    > >> >> on the machine and a little of praying.
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would a
    > >> > bios
    > >> > image on a CD work?
    > >> > Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    > >> >
    > >> > I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to
    > >> > use,
    > >> > but I thought I'd better ask.
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?=, May 24, 2006
    #15
  16. Tony Sperling

    Rick Guest

    What Carlos is talking about is not a regular BIOS update; it's an
    emergency flashing of the BIOS if something happens and your system will
    not boot up - a corrupted BIOS.

    John Barnes wrote:
    > I have updated my ASUS BIOS via a bootable CD(RW)
    > To update the BIOS via floppy, you need the boot files and the ASUS update
    > program awdflash
    >
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Rick:
    >> Thanks for your supporting answer.
    >> The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    >> Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and do
    >> the
    >> recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the
    >> BIOS.
    >> Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now, there
    >> is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    >> alternative.
    >> It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    >> Carlos
    >>
    >> "Rick" wrote:
    >>
    >>> That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    >>> the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in the
    >>> user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos stated,
    >>> the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    >>> image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    >>> specific key combinations.
    >>>
    >>> DP wrote:
    >>>> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that
    >>>>> keeps a
    >>>>> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    >>>>> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    >>>>> image.
    >>>>> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    >>>>> turning
    >>>>> on the machine and a little of praying.
    >>>>
    >>>> Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would a
    >>>> bios
    >>>> image on a CD work?
    >>>> Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    >>>>
    >>>> I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to
    >>>> use,
    >>>> but I thought I'd better ask.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>

    >
    >
     
    Rick, May 24, 2006
    #16
  17. Tony Sperling

    John Barnes Guest

    I stand corrected.

    "Rick" <> wrote in message
    news:OdbKF$...
    > What Carlos is talking about is not a regular BIOS update; it's an
    > emergency flashing of the BIOS if something happens and your system will
    > not boot up - a corrupted BIOS.
    >
    > John Barnes wrote:
    >> I have updated my ASUS BIOS via a bootable CD(RW)
    >> To update the BIOS via floppy, you need the boot files and the ASUS
    >> update program awdflash
    >>
    >> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Rick:
    >>> Thanks for your supporting answer.
    >>> The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    >>> Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and do
    >>> the
    >>> recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the
    >>> BIOS.
    >>> Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now,
    >>> there
    >>> is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    >>> alternative.
    >>> It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    >>> Carlos
    >>>
    >>> "Rick" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    >>>> the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in
    >>>> the
    >>>> user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos stated,
    >>>> the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    >>>> image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    >>>> specific key combinations.
    >>>>
    >>>> DP wrote:
    >>>>> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:...
    >>>>>> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that
    >>>>>> keeps a
    >>>>>> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    >>>>>> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working BIOS
    >>>>>> image.
    >>>>>> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    >>>>>> turning
    >>>>>> on the machine and a little of praying.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would
    >>>>> a bios
    >>>>> image on a CD work?
    >>>>> Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to
    >>>>> use,
    >>>>> but I thought I'd better ask.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>

    >>
     
    John Barnes, May 24, 2006
    #17
  18. Tony Sperling

    Mercury Guest

    Everyone is progressively covering all the options as usually happens... so
    I'll attempt to add 2 cents worth.

    ALT F2 on Asus is an Emergency procedure and will read - depends on the
    motherboard Floppy or CD - perhaps any bootable device so long as you can
    make the image in the correct format.

    As always flashing the BIOS is not to be seen as a trivial procress -
    always dowload the most recent BIOS flash utility,
    Verify the files downloaded & have 2 copies in case Floppy media fails,
    always flash from "DOS" unless you have no choice,
    RTFM,
    Read special notes on the appropriate motherboard web site,
    don't attempt to flash an unstable system.
    don't flash the BIOS from within Windows - you are adding a lot of extra
    possible points of failure.
    Have an answer to the question "What if it fails".

    You can take 2 paths with BIOS - keep adrift with them, keep them up to date
    and have a BIOS Saviour chip (a bit pointless really unless one sells a lot
    of a specific set of boards), *or* avoid them like the plague and do a
    thorough review if you suspect you must do a bios update.

    I tend to take the latter approach - on new motherboards (new to me &
    market) I update the BIOS to "stable" when the system is new so that a
    failure has least consequences. Theoretically I should then not have to
    touch the BIOS needed (unless there is a good reason) and there is a
    reasonably stock set of reasons to check the need for BIOS updates EG
    support for new CPU's.

    HTH

    2 cents




    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I stand corrected.
    >
    > "Rick" <> wrote in message
    > news:OdbKF$...
    >> What Carlos is talking about is not a regular BIOS update; it's an
    >> emergency flashing of the BIOS if something happens and your system will
    >> not boot up - a corrupted BIOS.
    >>
    >> John Barnes wrote:
    >>> I have updated my ASUS BIOS via a bootable CD(RW)
    >>> To update the BIOS via floppy, you need the boot files and the ASUS
    >>> update program awdflash
    >>>
    >>> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Rick:
    >>>> Thanks for your supporting answer.
    >>>> The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    >>>> Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and do
    >>>> the
    >>>> recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the
    >>>> BIOS.
    >>>> Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now,
    >>>> there
    >>>> is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    >>>> alternative.
    >>>> It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    >>>> Carlos
    >>>>
    >>>> "Rick" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have used
    >>>>> the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos
    >>>>> stated,
    >>>>> the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    >>>>> image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    >>>>> specific key combinations.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> DP wrote:
    >>>>>> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that
    >>>>>>> keeps a
    >>>>>>> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    >>>>>>> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working
    >>>>>>> BIOS
    >>>>>>> image.
    >>>>>>> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the drive,
    >>>>>>> turning
    >>>>>>> on the machine and a little of praying.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer? Would
    >>>>>> a bios
    >>>>>> image on a CD work?
    >>>>>> Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge to
    >>>>>> use,
    >>>>>> but I thought I'd better ask.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>

    >
     
    Mercury, May 26, 2006
    #18
  19. Well, I have to say - that pretty much sums up the attitude I have been
    keeping too. On the other hand, we probably should acknowledge that
    technology advances is chipping away at the complexity of having graphical
    utilities that dig through layers that really aren't so much a part of the
    actual OS, down to the BIOS itself.

    As I am most likely going to invest in ASUS the next time, and that company
    have several years of research into this complexity, and having
    knowledgeable people you trust vouching for the stability, I surely will try
    it at some point - I want to see it at work.

    But then I don't really see why it should be benefitial at all, I downloaded
    a zipfile from Asrock and extracted it directly to a floppy - re-booted and
    typed the name of the BIOS image and after 6 - 8 sec's I re-booted again and
    entered the setup program and checked it was set to 'safe', and that's it.
    It is so uncomplicated that doing it from within windows doesn't seem to
    have any apparent bonus.

    The 'rush' you get is from watching the progress meter, as Carlos says, the
    seconds after you cross the point of no easy return - yea, that is scary!

    So all the fuzz you have to go through - the progress bar, the re-booting,
    and the configuration check - that is all the same, I'd say it seems easier
    the DOS way, but of course some manufacturers force you to find the correct
    BIOS image, then find the proper flash utility and put it on the floppy and
    having impossibly convoluted names on the BIOS image to type, well in that
    case I would happily embrace a package solution any day, but that is what I
    found with Asrock.


    Tony. . .


    "Mercury" <> wrote in message news:e56e0l$aj$...
    > Everyone is progressively covering all the options as usually happens...
    > so I'll attempt to add 2 cents worth.
    >
    > ALT F2 on Asus is an Emergency procedure and will read - depends on the
    > motherboard Floppy or CD - perhaps any bootable device so long as you can
    > make the image in the correct format.
    >
    > As always flashing the BIOS is not to be seen as a trivial procress -
    > always dowload the most recent BIOS flash utility,
    > Verify the files downloaded & have 2 copies in case Floppy media fails,
    > always flash from "DOS" unless you have no choice,
    > RTFM,
    > Read special notes on the appropriate motherboard web site,
    > don't attempt to flash an unstable system.
    > don't flash the BIOS from within Windows - you are adding a lot of extra
    > possible points of failure.
    > Have an answer to the question "What if it fails".
    >
    > You can take 2 paths with BIOS - keep adrift with them, keep them up to
    > date and have a BIOS Saviour chip (a bit pointless really unless one sells
    > a lot of a specific set of boards), *or* avoid them like the plague and do
    > a thorough review if you suspect you must do a bios update.
    >
    > I tend to take the latter approach - on new motherboards (new to me &
    > market) I update the BIOS to "stable" when the system is new so that a
    > failure has least consequences. Theoretically I should then not have to
    > touch the BIOS needed (unless there is a good reason) and there is a
    > reasonably stock set of reasons to check the need for BIOS updates EG
    > support for new CPU's.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > 2 cents
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I stand corrected.
    >>
    >> "Rick" <> wrote in message
    >> news:OdbKF$...
    >>> What Carlos is talking about is not a regular BIOS update; it's an
    >>> emergency flashing of the BIOS if something happens and your system will
    >>> not boot up - a corrupted BIOS.
    >>>
    >>> John Barnes wrote:
    >>>> I have updated my ASUS BIOS via a bootable CD(RW)
    >>>> To update the BIOS via floppy, you need the boot files and the ASUS
    >>>> update program awdflash
    >>>>
    >>>> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Rick:
    >>>>> Thanks for your supporting answer.
    >>>>> The mobo manufacturer is the right place to go.
    >>>>> Anyway, it is way much cheaper to buy (or borrow) a floppy drive and
    >>>>> do the
    >>>>> recovery than having to replace the entire motherboard or replace the
    >>>>> BIOS.
    >>>>> Notwithstanding, and I don't have the mobo manual with me right now,
    >>>>> there
    >>>>> is a slight chance that ASUS might be supporting the CD BIOS recovery
    >>>>> alternative.
    >>>>> It is a matter of doing a little research on the net.
    >>>>> Carlos
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Rick" wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> That's a question you should address to the manufacturer. I have
    >>>>>> used
    >>>>>> the floppy recovery just to verify it works, but there is nothing in
    >>>>>> the
    >>>>>> user's manual to indicate you could substitute a CD. As Carlos
    >>>>>> stated,
    >>>>>> the floppy does not have any boot information on it, only the BIOS
    >>>>>> image. The computer is forced to read the image from the floppy with
    >>>>>> specific key combinations.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> DP wrote:
    >>>>>>> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>> Modern BIOSes (ASUS, for example) have a non-writable portion that
    >>>>>>>> keeps a
    >>>>>>>> small piece of code available for emergency recovery.
    >>>>>>>> All you'll need is a floppy (non bootable) with a proven working
    >>>>>>>> BIOS
    >>>>>>>> image.
    >>>>>>>> I think that it is only a matter of placing the floppy in the
    >>>>>>>> drive,
    >>>>>>>> turning
    >>>>>>>> on the machine and a little of praying.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Carlos: What if you don't have a floppy drive on your computer?
    >>>>>>> Would a bios
    >>>>>>> image on a CD work?
    >>>>>>> Or is it too much to ask a crippled computer to find the CD drive?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I hope I never get to the point where I have to put this knowledge
    >>>>>>> to use,
    >>>>>>> but I thought I'd better ask.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>

    >>

    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, May 26, 2006
    #19
    1. Advertising

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