Fall Back, U.S.A!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John Turco, Nov 2, 2009.

  1. John Turco

    John Turco Guest

    Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your timepieces, back
    an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday morning (November 1, 2009), in
    our country.

    I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various electronic
    devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax K100D); initially, I forgot
    a few of the devices (including some cameras), and did them later.

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Paintings Pain and Pun <http://laughatthepain.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Nov 2, 2009
    #1
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  2. John Turco

    Toxic Guest

    On Sun, 01 Nov 2009 23:36:45 -0600, John Turco wrote:

    > Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    > timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday
    > morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >
    > I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    > electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax
    > K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including some
    > cameras), and did them later.


    Fortunately almost all my clocks set themselves and even recognize the
    DST flag encoded by NIST, this includes all my wall clocks, the GPS, one
    shortwave receiver (eton E1), a couple Casio G-shock wrist watches, as
    well as the computer. All I'm left with is the on board timestamp clock
    in the Canon, and the clock in the microwave oven.
     
    Toxic, Nov 2, 2009
    #2
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  3. > Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    > timepieces, back
    > an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday morning (November
    > 1, 2009), in
    > our country.
    >
    > I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    > electronic
    > devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax K100D);
    > initially, I forgot
    > a few of the devices (including some cameras), and did them later.
    >
    > --
    > Cordially,
    > John Turco <>


    I leave my cameras on UTC - much other stuff is automatic these days.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Nov 2, 2009
    #3
  4. John Turco

    celcius Guest

    "John Turco" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    > timepieces, back
    > an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday morning (November 1,
    > 2009), in
    > our country.
    >
    > I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    > electronic
    > devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax K100D); initially,
    > I forgot
    > a few of the devices (including some cameras), and did them later.
    >
    > --
    > Cordially,
    > John Turco <>
    >
    > Paintings Pain and Pun <http://laughatthepain.blogspot.com>


    Hi John!
    I'm a fellow Canadian, but thanks anyway. I thought of everything ... except
    the cameras ;-))) DONE!
    Thanks,
    Marcel
     
    celcius, Nov 2, 2009
    #4
  5. John Turco

    ray Guest

    On Sun, 01 Nov 2009 23:36:45 -0600, John Turco wrote:

    > Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    > timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday
    > morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >
    > I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    > electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax
    > K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including some
    > cameras), and did them later.


    Another four million man-hours down the crapper!
     
    ray, Nov 2, 2009
    #5
  6. John Turco

    mianileng Guest

    John Turco wrote:
    > Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of
    > your
    > timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on
    > Sunday
    > morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >
    > I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks,
    > various
    > electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR
    > (Pentax
    > K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including
    > some
    > cameras), and did them later.


    As someone living in a country where DST is not used, I have
    never been able to understand the logic behind the practice or
    how it's considered to be worth all the disruption and
    adjustments it makes necessary. By adjustments, I mean not just
    the twice-a-year resetting of clocks, but also adjusting life
    (personal, business, time-critical management, etc.) to the new
    timings. But I'm not blindly criticising something I don't
    understand. I'm open to enlightenment.
     
    mianileng, Nov 2, 2009
    #6
  7. John Turco

    Ofnuts Guest

    mianileng wrote:
    > John Turco wrote:
    >> Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of
    >> your
    >> timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on
    >> Sunday
    >> morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >>
    >> I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks,
    >> various
    >> electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR
    >> (Pentax
    >> K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including
    >> some
    >> cameras), and did them later.

    >
    > As someone living in a country where DST is not used, I have
    > never been able to understand the logic behind the practice or
    > how it's considered to be worth all the disruption and
    > adjustments it makes necessary. By adjustments, I mean not just
    > the twice-a-year resetting of clocks, but also adjusting life
    > (personal, business, time-critical management, etc.) to the new
    > timings. But I'm not blindly criticising something I don't
    > understand. I'm open to enlightenment.


    The idea is that in summer (because Winter time is closer to true time)
    more evening activities can take place in daylight. In other words, this
    takes daylight hours in the very early morning (when most people are
    still asleep) and puts them in the evening.

    Of course, if the offices of government and big companies, schools,
    daycare centers, shops, all started the day at 7am and finished it at
    4pm, this would have about the same effect.
    --
    Bertrand
     
    Ofnuts, Nov 2, 2009
    #7
  8. John Turco

    M-M Guest

    In article <hcn191$jbl$>,
    "mianileng" <> wrote:

    > By adjustments, I mean not just
    > the twice-a-year resetting of clocks, but also adjusting life
    > (personal, business, time-critical management, etc.) to the new
    > timings.



    It's no different than moving to another time zone one hour off. Nothing
    changes except the clocks.

    Fall-back is my favorite day of the year. You get an extra hour to do
    with as you please!

    --
    m-m
    http://www.mhmyers.com
     
    M-M, Nov 2, 2009
    #8
  9. John Turco

    ray Guest

    On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 21:57:08 +0530, mianileng wrote:

    > John Turco wrote:
    >> Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    >> timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday
    >> morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >>
    >> I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    >> electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax
    >> K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including some
    >> cameras), and did them later.

    >
    > As someone living in a country where DST is not used, I have never been
    > able to understand the logic behind the practice or how it's considered
    > to be worth all the disruption and adjustments it makes necessary. By
    > adjustments, I mean not just the twice-a-year resetting of clocks, but
    > also adjusting life (personal, business, time-critical management, etc.)
    > to the new timings. But I'm not blindly criticising something I don't
    > understand. I'm open to enlightenment.


    No logic to it at all. It's claimed it saves energy, but a study in
    Indiana (a 'split' state) showed that to be totally bogus. It's
    psychological - that's all. And a huge waste of resources, resetting all
    the damned clocks twice a year. It should certainly be abolished - would
    make life simpler all the way around.
     
    ray, Nov 2, 2009
    #9
  10. John Turco

    mianileng Guest

    Ofnuts wrote:
    > mianileng wrote:
    >>
    >> As someone living in a country where DST is not used, I have
    >> never been able to understand the logic behind the practice or
    >> how it's considered to be worth all the disruption and
    >> adjustments it makes necessary. By adjustments, I mean not
    >> just
    >> the twice-a-year resetting of clocks, but also adjusting life
    >> (personal, business, time-critical management, etc.) to the
    >> new
    >> timings. But I'm not blindly criticising something I don't
    >> understand. I'm open to enlightenment.

    >
    > The idea is that in summer (because Winter time is closer to
    > true
    > time) more evening activities can take place in daylight. In
    > other
    > words, this takes daylight hours in the very early morning
    > (when most
    > people are still asleep) and puts them in the evening.
    >
    > Of course, if the offices of government and big companies,
    > schools,
    > daycare centers, shops, all started the day at 7am and finished
    > it at
    > 4pm, this would have about the same effect.


    That's what's done over here. As the days grow shorter with the
    approach of winter, working hours are simply shortened, usually
    from mid-October. Government office timings are changed from 9-5
    to 9:30-4, and revert to 9-5 in spring. Businesses also make
    similar adjustments. I feel that this causes fewer complications
    than DST.
     
    mianileng, Nov 2, 2009
    #10
  11. John Turco

    tony cooper Guest

    On 2 Nov 2009 17:31:10 GMT, ray <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 21:57:08 +0530, mianileng wrote:
    >
    >> John Turco wrote:
    >>> Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    >>> timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday
    >>> morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >>>
    >>> I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    >>> electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax
    >>> K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including some
    >>> cameras), and did them later.

    >>
    >> As someone living in a country where DST is not used, I have never been
    >> able to understand the logic behind the practice or how it's considered
    >> to be worth all the disruption and adjustments it makes necessary. By
    >> adjustments, I mean not just the twice-a-year resetting of clocks, but
    >> also adjusting life (personal, business, time-critical management, etc.)
    >> to the new timings. But I'm not blindly criticising something I don't
    >> understand. I'm open to enlightenment.

    >
    >No logic to it at all. It's claimed it saves energy, but a study in
    >Indiana (a 'split' state) showed that to be totally bogus. It's
    >psychological - that's all. And a huge waste of resources, resetting all
    >the damned clocks twice a year. It should certainly be abolished - would
    >make life simpler all the way around.


    I reset two automobile clocks, two alarm clocks, one wrist-watch, and
    one wall clock yesterday. It took about as much resources to do as
    sneezing.

    It's far less complicated than figuring out if the Customer Service
    phones will be answered by companies in other time zones when I'm
    making calls early in the morning or late afternoon.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 2, 2009
    #11
  12. John Turco

    ray Guest

    On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 13:51:04 -0500, tony cooper wrote:

    > On 2 Nov 2009 17:31:10 GMT, ray <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 21:57:08 +0530, mianileng wrote:
    >>
    >>> John Turco wrote:
    >>>> Hello, my fellow Americans...did you remember to move all of your
    >>>> timepieces, back an hour? Daylight Saving Time ended, early on Sunday
    >>>> morning (November 1, 2009), in our country.
    >>>>
    >>>> I, personally, needed to reset my wristwatch, several clocks, various
    >>>> electronic devices, a number of digicams and my lone DSLR (Pentax
    >>>> K100D); initially, I forgot a few of the devices (including some
    >>>> cameras), and did them later.
    >>>
    >>> As someone living in a country where DST is not used, I have never
    >>> been able to understand the logic behind the practice or how it's
    >>> considered to be worth all the disruption and adjustments it makes
    >>> necessary. By adjustments, I mean not just the twice-a-year resetting
    >>> of clocks, but also adjusting life (personal, business, time-critical
    >>> management, etc.) to the new timings. But I'm not blindly criticising
    >>> something I don't understand. I'm open to enlightenment.

    >>
    >>No logic to it at all. It's claimed it saves energy, but a study in
    >>Indiana (a 'split' state) showed that to be totally bogus. It's
    >>psychological - that's all. And a huge waste of resources, resetting all
    >>the damned clocks twice a year. It should certainly be abolished - would
    >>make life simpler all the way around.

    >
    > I reset two automobile clocks, two alarm clocks, one wrist-watch, and
    > one wall clock yesterday. It took about as much resources to do as
    > sneezing.


    Great - now multiply the time it took to do it by 300,000,000 people in
    the US. And don't forget the microwave, the oven, the VCR, . . .

    >
    > It's far less complicated than figuring out if the Customer Service
    > phones will be answered by companies in other time zones when I'm making
    > calls early in the morning or late afternoon.


    Particularly when you don't know if they're in Arizona, California or New
    Mexico (for example) all of whom have different ideas of the time. As I
    understand the Chinese get around the whole damned problem by having one
    time zone for the entire country.
     
    ray, Nov 2, 2009
    #12
  13. John Turco

    ray Guest

    On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 18:21:27 -0500, Robert Haar wrote:

    > On 11/2/09 10:35 AM, "ray" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Another four million man-hours down the crapper!

    >
    > I think you underestimate by an order of magnitude or more.


    Just a quick back of the envelope thing - you're probably right.
     
    ray, Nov 3, 2009
    #13
  14. John Turco

    tony cooper Guest

    On 3 Nov 2009 01:05:27 GMT, ray <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 18:21:27 -0500, Robert Haar wrote:
    >
    >> On 11/2/09 10:35 AM, "ray" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Another four million man-hours down the crapper!

    >>
    >> I think you underestimate by an order of magnitude or more.

    >
    >Just a quick back of the envelope thing - you're probably right.


    Before time can be considered to be wasted, you have to determine that
    the time would be otherwise better spent on some more useful activity.

    If it takes a person five minutes to change the necessary clocks, and
    if that person would have spent those five minutes watching Jerry
    Springer or Oprah if there wasn't a need to change the clocks, then
    there is no waste. If the person multi-tasks, as most of us do, while
    changing the clocks, there is no wasted time.

    Who here didn't have time to do something important Sunday because
    they had to divert that time to changing the clocks?

    Don't all raise your hands at once.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Nov 3, 2009
    #14
  15. John Turco

    ray Guest

    On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 21:46:34 -0500, tony cooper wrote:

    > On 3 Nov 2009 01:05:27 GMT, ray <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 18:21:27 -0500, Robert Haar wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 11/2/09 10:35 AM, "ray" <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Another four million man-hours down the crapper!
    >>>
    >>> I think you underestimate by an order of magnitude or more.

    >>
    >>Just a quick back of the envelope thing - you're probably right.

    >
    > Before time can be considered to be wasted, you have to determine that
    > the time would be otherwise better spent on some more useful activity.
    >
    > If it takes a person five minutes to change the necessary clocks, and if
    > that person would have spent those five minutes watching Jerry Springer
    > or Oprah if there wasn't a need to change the clocks, then there is no
    > waste. If the person multi-tasks, as most of us do, while changing the
    > clocks, there is no wasted time.
    >
    > Who here didn't have time to do something important Sunday because they
    > had to divert that time to changing the clocks?
    >
    > Don't all raise your hands at once.


    Wait til they get to work!
     
    ray, Nov 3, 2009
    #15
  16. John Turco

    Toxic Guest

    On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 21:46:34 -0500, tony cooper wrote:


    > Who here didn't have time to do something important Sunday because they
    > had to divert that time to changing the clocks?


    My clocks all set themselves, leaving me free to do the nothing of
    importance stuff that happens at that time of the morning.
     
    Toxic, Nov 3, 2009
    #16
  17. John Turco

    whisky-dave Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 3 Nov 2009 01:05:27 GMT, ray <> wrote:
    >


    >
    > If it takes a person five minutes to change the necessary clocks, and
    > if that person would have spent those five minutes watching Jerry
    > Springer or Oprah if there wasn't a need to change the clocks, then
    > there is no waste. If the person multi-tasks, as most of us do, while
    > changing the clocks, there is no wasted time.


    But almost no one can multi-task that just think theyv can,
    what a person does is time-slice adn proiratorise even teh eye does that
    as only about 15% of our total vision is active at any one point the brain
    captutes the view then the eye scans another area and captures that and the
    brain joins
    it and pretends it's one picture, which is how and why magitians can perform
    their tricks.
    They use this time-slicing to make sure we don;t 'see' what they are doing.


    > Who here didn't have time to do something important Sunday because
    > they had to divert that time to changing the clocks?
    >
    > Don't all raise your hands at once.


    Nah most of mine change themselves, the others I do when I have 'free time'
    ;-)
    In there's one that I don't change from year to year.
     
    whisky-dave, Nov 3, 2009
    #17
  18. John Turco

    whisky-dave Guest

    "No spam please" <> wrote in message
    news:hcpa8e$i5c$...

    > Hello guys.
    >
    > The UK first used Summer Time during World War One to help to increase
    > productivity.


    I thought the most recent excuse for todays time change was something to do
    with kids
    going to school o the dark and accidents when driving .

    > The UK also tried to keep on Summer Time all through the winter. Nice
    > experiment but not liked by those who voiced their opinion.


    I only discovered a couple of weeks ago thatr india has 1/2 hour times zones
    i.e not 24 hours but and extra increment. I discovered this using Apples
    world clock
    on New Delhi where my friend is currently staying.
    I'd always thought that time zones were all 1 hour steps.
     
    whisky-dave, Nov 3, 2009
    #18
  19. John Turco

    whisky-dave Guest

    "ray" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 13:51:04 -0500, tony cooper wrote:



    > Great - now multiply the time it took to do it by 300,000,000 people in
    > the US. And don't forget the microwave, the oven, the VCR, . . .


    But you don;t need to change the microwave, or cooker time do you ?
    Cokoing time doesn't change depending oin time of year.
    VCR yes if you still have such an antique device my DVD recorder changes
    itself ;-)

    >> It's far less complicated than figuring out if the Customer Service
    >> phones will be answered by companies in other time zones when I'm making
    >> calls early in the morning or late afternoon.

    >
    > Particularly when you don't know if they're in Arizona, California or New
    > Mexico (for example) all of whom have different ideas of the time. As I
    > understand the Chinese get around the whole damned problem by having one
    > time zone for the entire country.


    And India splits it in to 30 min times zones.

    >
     
    whisky-dave, Nov 3, 2009
    #19
  20. John Turco

    J. Clarke Guest

    whisky-dave wrote:
    > "ray" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Mon, 02 Nov 2009 13:51:04 -0500, tony cooper wrote:

    >
    >
    >> Great - now multiply the time it took to do it by 300,000,000 people
    >> in the US. And don't forget the microwave, the oven, the VCR, . . .

    >
    > But you don;t need to change the microwave, or cooker time do you ?
    > Cokoing time doesn't change depending oin time of year.
    > VCR yes if you still have such an antique device my DVD recorder
    > changes itself ;-)


    Yes, you do have to set the microwave--it has a clock, if you don't reset it
    then you're going to look at it one day forgetting that you didn't reset it
    and end up missing an important appointment.

    The real pisser is the idiots changing the date, so that some things now
    need to be reset _four_ times, twice when official change occurs, and twice
    more to unset the change that was programmed into them at the factory using
    the old dates. And no, they don't all have USB ports.

    >>> It's far less complicated than figuring out if the Customer Service
    >>> phones will be answered by companies in other time zones when I'm
    >>> making calls early in the morning or late afternoon.

    >>
    >> Particularly when you don't know if they're in Arizona, California
    >> or New Mexico (for example) all of whom have different ideas of the
    >> time. As I understand the Chinese get around the whole damned
    >> problem by having one time zone for the entire country.

    >
    > And India splits it in to 30 min times zones.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 3, 2009
    #20
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