Fact or Fiction?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Ron, May 16, 2006.

  1. Ron

    Ron Guest

    On the show, 24, somebody mentioned a "poison pill firewall." Does
    anybody know if such a firewall actually exists or is it made up for
    the show?

    Ron
     
    Ron, May 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. Ron

    Journeyman Guest

    I am pretty sure its fake, but perhaps if you give us more info about
    what it does, maybe it just has a different name in the real world
     
    Journeyman, May 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Ron

    Notan Guest

    Ron wrote:
    >
    > On the show, 24, somebody mentioned a "poison pill firewall." Does
    > anybody know if such a firewall actually exists or is it made up for
    > the show?


    TV? It must be true.

    Just out of (minimal) curiosity, what was it supposed to do?

    Notan
     
    Notan, May 16, 2006
    #3
  4. Ron

    Gerard Bok Guest

    On 16 May 2006 10:59:26 -0700, "Ron" <> wrote:

    >On the show, 24, somebody mentioned a "poison pill firewall." Does
    >anybody know if such a firewall actually exists or is it made up for
    >the show?


    Maybe if you Google for Honeypot you get the picture ?

    --
    Kind regards,
    Gerard Bok
     
    Gerard Bok, May 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Ron

    Ron Guest

    Journeyman wrote:
    > I am pretty sure its fake, but perhaps if you give us more info about
    > what it does, maybe it just has a different name in the real world



    As the story went, this terrorist set up his system with a firewall
    that if breached a certain number of times, then all data on his hard
    drive(s) would be erased on the theory that the only people likely to
    attempt hacking his system would be US Government and that his plans
    and data would be better off destroyed than in any way be captured.

    I know for most people that arrangement is more than a little harsh,
    but I was wondering just from a security standpoint, if such a "poison
    pill" firewall could be implemented if somebody did have information
    that they absolutely *needed* to keep secret and out of the hands of
    anyone else. Say corporate data, or for financial records you don't
    want your wife's divorce lawyers to get access to. <g>

    Ron
     
    Ron, May 17, 2006
    #5
  6. Ron

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Ron wrote:

    > On the show, 24, somebody mentioned a "poison pill firewall." Does
    > anybody know if such a firewall actually exists or is it made up for
    > the show?
    >
    > Ron
    >


    firewall called 'phoenix' ::= if it detects a breach it wipes out all
    the working data ! Gives 'b ackup ' a whole new perspective!!
     
    Rick Merrill, May 17, 2006
    #6
  7. Ron

    Journeyman Guest

    it is possible sort of, except it wouldnt really be the firewall doing
    this, the firewall merely says yes or no to outbound and inbound
    traffic based on rules, you could create a script to wipe the harddrive
    after x many attempts on certian port or what not, now this is not
    pratical as there are so many random scans out there you would always
    be wipping your harddrive. You could set it up to wipe the harddrive
    after x failed login attempts with ssh, but once again silly because
    the system was never really compermised, it would make more sense to
    set up an IDS would would detect an intrustion. so to answer your
    question, sure its completely possible, not very practical
     
    Journeyman, May 17, 2006
    #7
  8. Ron schreef:
    > I know for most people that arrangement is more than a little harsh,
    > but I was wondering just from a security standpoint, if such a "poison
    > pill" firewall could be implemented if somebody did have information
    > that they absolutely *needed* to keep secret and out of the hands of
    > anyone else. Say corporate data, or for financial records you don't
    > want your wife's divorce lawyers to get access to. <g>


    I do not have it on my firewalls, but I do have it on my PDA.
    Too many times a wrong password, and *poof*...

    For corporate data on servers one feasible way would be imho to have
    this data encrypted already, and remove eg. keystores/rings/HSM-keys
    when the firewall says so.

    John
     
    John Veldhuis, May 17, 2006
    #8
  9. Ron

    SOiL Guest

    Just another great example of how firewall security leads to
    insecurity.

    With this firewall an attacker can not only compromise my system, but
    also erase all my working data by simply convincing my firewall it is
    breached? Great! I can't wait until Microsoft enables this on all
    shipping versions of Windows.

    Obviously this is way too sensible for USENET, but if the firewall can
    detect a breach, wouldn't a better response be to close the breach
    rather than start the several hours of secure wiping required for even
    a
    reasonable sized drive?

    Anyway the wipe would still be running and your information just as
    compromised for up to 24 hours after such a detection/response.

    Of course, anyone who would run such a firewall wouldn't relize that
    just deleting files doesn't remove the data. They are less secure,
    and
    confident they are protected at the same time. Firewall = nice
    marketing ploy.

    To the orig poster, what possible benefit does such a terrorist have
    in
    putting his machine on the Internet? Wouldn't he just host his evil
    plans from the net cafe while his data archive is secure at home in
    the
    Faraday cage?

    -s

    Rick Merrill <> wrote in
    news::

    > Ron wrote:
    >
    >> On the show, 24, somebody mentioned a "poison pill firewall." Does
    >> anybody know if such a firewall actually exists or is it made up

    for
    >> the show?
    >>
    >> Ron
    >>

    >
    > firewall called 'phoenix' ::= if it detects a breach it wipes out

    all
    > the working data ! Gives 'b ackup ' a whole new perspective!!
    >
     
    SOiL, May 18, 2006
    #9
  10. Ron

    Guest

    Not a firewall - but self-destructing hard drives without the need for
    random wipes DOES exist, though very expensive. It is called, "Dead On
    Demand" and can be destroyed by various methods instantly (including
    remotely). The best example would be Ensconce Data Technology:
    http://www.ensconcedata.com The technology uses a small vial of
    corrosive acid that completely destroys the drive platter - without
    damage to the rest of the computer. It's pretty "James Bond" like stuff
    and you pay dearly for it.
     
    , May 18, 2006
    #10
  11. Ron

    Gremlin Guest

    SOiL wrote:
    > Obviously this is way too sensible for USENET, but if the firewall can
    > detect a breach, wouldn't a better response be to close the breach
    > rather than start the several hours of secure wiping required for even
    > a
    > reasonable sized drive?


    Oh wait. They had some explosives attached to the hard disk. It will
    detonate to wipe your data. :)

    --

    Regards,
    Dustin Cook
    http://bughunter.atspace.org
     
    Gremlin, May 19, 2006
    #11
  12. Ron

    Ron Guest

    SOiL wrote:
    > To the orig poster, what possible benefit does such a terrorist have
    > in
    > putting his machine on the Internet? Wouldn't he just host his evil
    > plans from the net cafe while his data archive is secure at home in
    > the
    > Faraday cage?


    His system wasn't on the Internet but on a private network. But for the
    most part, the story was written more towards suspense and drama, than
    for accuracy so I wouldn't expect too much logic behind it. :)

    Ron
     
    Ron, May 19, 2006
    #12
  13. Ron

    Gremlin Guest

    wrote:
    > Not a firewall - but self-destructing hard drives without the need for
    > random wipes DOES exist, though very expensive. It is called, "Dead On
    > Demand" and can be destroyed by various methods instantly (including
    > remotely). The best example would be Ensconce Data Technology:
    > http://www.ensconcedata.com The technology uses a small vial of
    > corrosive acid that completely destroys the drive platter - without
    > damage to the rest of the computer. It's pretty "James Bond" like stuff
    > and you pay dearly for it.


    If your dealing with that type of information, it's a small price to
    pay to ensure it doesn't leave that drive

    --

    Regards,
    Dustin Cook
    http://bughunter.atspace.org
     
    Gremlin, May 21, 2006
    #13
  14. Ron

    SamCY

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    ther are some firewalls purchasable but not at the level it says on 24... the kinda firewall it mentions kills all accessable data on your computer to stop ppl from seein it... gfi is a good system to use if you want somethin like that but u can lose some data if it happens
     
    SamCY, Mar 26, 2009
    #14
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