external harddrive question

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by JedMeister, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. JedMeister

    JedMeister Guest

    A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external hardrives
    for their work (video editing).

    1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the edited
    digital video footage.

    They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not replace
    the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the drive
    more quickly.

    Does this sound right?
    JedMeister, Jul 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. JedMeister

    Rider Guest

    "JedMeister" <> wrote in message
    news:AhjIc.9833$...
    > A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external hardrives
    > for their work (video editing).
    >
    > 1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the edited
    > digital video footage.
    >
    > They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not

    replace
    > the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the drive
    > more quickly.
    >
    > Does this sound right?
    >
    >
    >


    No ... they have a duty to replace it regardless of its use. If he'd been
    using it as a hammer, then they don't have to replace it.
    Rider, Jul 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. JedMeister

    JedMeister Guest

    Because this is for commercial use it is not covered under the consumer
    rights act so I am not sure of their rights.

    Initially the supplier was saying that a virus was wiping out the drive (but
    it did not wipe out the c drive), and that Norton is incapable of detecting
    the virus - the supplier did not check the pc so I don't know how they
    could assume this was the prob.

    Anyway, they ran some other virus scanner (trend??) and it found nothing.




    "Rider" <> wrote in message
    news:ccsffu$nob$...
    >
    > "JedMeister" <> wrote in message
    > news:AhjIc.9833$...
    > > A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external

    hardrives
    > > for their work (video editing).
    > >
    > > 1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the

    edited
    > > digital video footage.
    > >
    > > They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not

    > replace
    > > the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the drive
    > > more quickly.
    > >
    > > Does this sound right?
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > No ... they have a duty to replace it regardless of its use. If he'd been
    > using it as a hammer, then they don't have to replace it.
    >
    >
    >
    JedMeister, Jul 11, 2004
    #3
  4. JedMeister

    Collector_NZ Guest

    JedMeister said the following on 12/07/2004 10:36:
    > A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external hardrives
    > for their work (video editing).
    >
    > 1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the edited
    > digital video footage.
    >
    > They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not replace
    > the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the drive
    > more quickly.
    >
    > Does this sound right?
    >
    >
    >

    While it is a fact that many drive makers produce an AV version of thier
    HDD it is not for the wear factor, it is to do with extending data
    transfer by stopping the recalibration process.
    That said the supplier is dodging his responsibilities by using the
    wrong excuse. The use (for which it is intended) cannot be used to deny
    the replacement, but as it is commercial use the consumer protection
    rules dont apply.

    --
    Those who are too smart to engage in politics are punished by being
    governed by those who are dumber.
    Collector_NZ, Jul 12, 2004
    #4
  5. JedMeister

    John Guest

    "JedMeister" <> wrote in message
    news:bxjIc.9837$...
    > Because this is for commercial use it is not covered under the consumer
    > rights act so I am not sure of their rights.
    >
    > Initially the supplier was saying that a virus was wiping out the drive

    (but
    > it did not wipe out the c drive), and that Norton is incapable of

    detecting
    > the virus - the supplier did not check the pc so I don't know how they
    > could assume this was the prob.
    >
    > Anyway, they ran some other virus scanner (trend??) and it found nothing.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Rider" <> wrote in message
    > news:ccsffu$nob$...
    > >
    > > "JedMeister" <> wrote in message
    > > news:AhjIc.9833$...
    > > > A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external

    > hardrives
    > > > for their work (video editing).
    > > >
    > > > 1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the

    > edited
    > > > digital video footage.
    > > >
    > > > They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not

    > > replace
    > > > the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the

    drive
    > > > more quickly.
    > > >
    > > > Does this sound right?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > No ... they have a duty to replace it regardless of its use. If he'd

    been
    > > using it as a hammer, then they don't have to replace it.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >


    It should come with at least a 1 year manufacturers warranty anyway. You are
    still protected by the sale of goods act.
    Wouldn't you be better using a specialist video hard drive?
    John, Jul 12, 2004
    #5
  6. JedMeister

    Brendan Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:53:00 +1200, JedMeister wrote:

    > Because this is for commercial use it is not covered under the consumer
    > rights act so I am not sure of their rights.
    >
    > Initially the supplier was saying that a virus was wiping out the drive (but
    > it did not wipe out the c drive), and that Norton is incapable of detecting
    > the virus - the supplier did not check the pc so I don't know how they
    > could assume this was the prob.
    >
    > Anyway, they ran some other virus scanner (trend??) and it found nothing.


    Have a look at the Fair Trading Act. It applies to commercial transactions.

    Also the warranty. None of the excuses so far exclude it from a warranty
    claim. Think of a disputes Tribunal.


    --

    .... Brendan

    "Show me the books he loves and I shall know the man far better than through mortal friends." -- S. Weir Mitchell

    Note: All my comments are copyright 12/07/2004 1:07:04 p.m. and are opinion only where not otherwise stated and always "to the best of my recollection". www.computerman.orcon.net.nz.
    Brendan, Jul 12, 2004
    #6
  7. JedMeister

    Steven H Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:53:00 +1200, JedMeister wrote:

    > Because this is for commercial use it is not covered under the consumer
    > rights act so I am not sure of their rights.
    >
    > Initially the supplier was saying that a virus was wiping out the drive (but
    > it did not wipe out the c drive), and that Norton is incapable of detecting
    > the virus - the supplier did not check the pc so I don't know how they
    > could assume this was the prob.
    >
    > Anyway, they ran some other virus scanner (trend??) and it found nothing.



    whats the suppliers name - they sound like a pack of wankers!


    --
    -------------------------------------------
    Steven H, 3rd Year B.I.T. Otago Polytechnic

    ..net Geek
    Steven H, Jul 12, 2004
    #7
  8. JedMeister

    JedMeister Guest

    I'm not sure who the supplier is, but there was some kind of support
    agreement in place with them.

    My relative has now asked them (today) for a replacement drive.

    "Steven H" <> wrote in message
    news:n9mcxato8mpu$...
    > On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:53:00 +1200, JedMeister wrote:
    >
    > > Because this is for commercial use it is not covered under the consumer
    > > rights act so I am not sure of their rights.
    > >
    > > Initially the supplier was saying that a virus was wiping out the drive

    (but
    > > it did not wipe out the c drive), and that Norton is incapable of

    detecting
    > > the virus - the supplier did not check the pc so I don't know how they
    > > could assume this was the prob.
    > >
    > > Anyway, they ran some other virus scanner (trend??) and it found

    nothing.
    >
    >
    > whats the suppliers name - they sound like a pack of wankers!
    >
    >
    > --
    > -------------------------------------------
    > Steven H, 3rd Year B.I.T. Otago Polytechnic
    >
    > .net Geek
    JedMeister, Jul 12, 2004
    #8
  9. JedMeister

    Gavin Tunney Guest

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:36:21 +1200, "JedMeister"
    <> wrote:

    >A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external hardrives
    >for their work (video editing).
    >
    >1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the edited
    >digital video footage.
    >
    >They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not replace
    >the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the drive
    >more quickly.
    >
    >Does this sound right?
    >


    They're talking bollocks. Video editing doesn't wear out a drive any
    quicker than any typical usage. SCSI hard drives get the most use in
    servers, far more than the average video editing hdd, and they're
    often guaranteed for five years.

    There used to be AV drives for video editing, but they merely had a
    different algorhythm for thermal calibration in the days when a
    separate platter was used for servo information. These days the servos
    are embedded in the tracks so it's not necessary any more.

    When you say it "keeps failing".. .what do you mean by that? Drives
    don't usually fail then come right again, once they're duffed they're
    duffed. Could it be the external unit that's faulty rather than the
    hdd?

    Cheers

    Gavin
    Gavin Tunney, Jul 12, 2004
    #9
  10. JedMeister

    JedMeister Guest

    I am not 100% familiar with the failure, but I think the drive would be OK
    one minute, then, it would display as an 'unformatted' volume. It is like
    the file allocation table (or whatever NTFS uses to index the files) is
    scrambled. Each time it occurs, they had been reformatting the drive which
    fixes this for a while.


    "Gavin Tunney" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:36:21 +1200, "JedMeister"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external hardrives
    > >for their work (video editing).
    > >
    > >1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the

    edited
    > >digital video footage.
    > >
    > >They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not

    replace
    > >the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the drive
    > >more quickly.
    > >
    > >Does this sound right?
    > >

    >
    > They're talking bollocks. Video editing doesn't wear out a drive any
    > quicker than any typical usage. SCSI hard drives get the most use in
    > servers, far more than the average video editing hdd, and they're
    > often guaranteed for five years.
    >
    > There used to be AV drives for video editing, but they merely had a
    > different algorhythm for thermal calibration in the days when a
    > separate platter was used for servo information. These days the servos
    > are embedded in the tracks so it's not necessary any more.
    >
    > When you say it "keeps failing".. .what do you mean by that? Drives
    > don't usually fail then come right again, once they're duffed they're
    > duffed. Could it be the external unit that's faulty rather than the
    > hdd?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Gavin
    JedMeister, Jul 12, 2004
    #10
  11. JedMeister

    Daver Guest

    Bin there done that with a maxtor external hard drive. Reformatted a few
    times but it got slower and slower to write to and finally failed.
    There is no such thing as commercial drives and the only difference for an
    AV drive is the reason below, sometimes coupled with a 8meg cache. However
    these days even ordinary drives are upto video capture.

    "JedMeister" <> wrote in message
    news:ZjpIc.9993$...
    > I am not 100% familiar with the failure, but I think the drive would be OK
    > one minute, then, it would display as an 'unformatted' volume. It is like
    > the file allocation table (or whatever NTFS uses to index the files) is
    > scrambled. Each time it occurs, they had been reformatting the drive which
    > fixes this for a while.
    >
    >
    > "Gavin Tunney" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 10:36:21 +1200, "JedMeister"
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >A relative recently (a few months ago) purchased 2 new external

    hardrives
    > > >for their work (video editing).
    > > >
    > > >1 of the external harddrives keeps failing and they keep losing the

    > edited
    > > >digital video footage.
    > > >
    > > >They contacted the drive supplier, who is saying that they will not

    > replace
    > > >the drive because it is used for video editing which wears out the

    drive
    > > >more quickly.
    > > >
    > > >Does this sound right?
    > > >

    > >
    > > They're talking bollocks. Video editing doesn't wear out a drive any
    > > quicker than any typical usage. SCSI hard drives get the most use in
    > > servers, far more than the average video editing hdd, and they're
    > > often guaranteed for five years.
    > >
    > > There used to be AV drives for video editing, but they merely had a
    > > different algorhythm for thermal calibration in the days when a
    > > separate platter was used for servo information. These days the servos
    > > are embedded in the tracks so it's not necessary any more.
    > >
    > > When you say it "keeps failing".. .what do you mean by that? Drives
    > > don't usually fail then come right again, once they're duffed they're
    > > duffed. Could it be the external unit that's faulty rather than the
    > > hdd?
    > >
    > > Cheers
    > >
    > > Gavin

    >
    >
    Daver, Jul 12, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <ZjpIc.9993$>,
    says...
    > I am not 100% familiar with the failure, but I think the drive would be OK
    > one minute, then, it would display as an 'unformatted' volume. It is like
    > the file allocation table (or whatever NTFS uses to index the files) is
    > scrambled. Each time it occurs, they had been reformatting the drive which
    > fixes this for a while.


    NTFS is journalled, meaning no such thing as a FAT. Could be a fault on
    your motherboard.
    Patrick Dunford, Jul 12, 2004
    #12
  13. On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 17:28:29 +1200, "JedMeister"
    <> wrote:

    >I am not 100% familiar with the failure, but I think the drive would be OK
    >one minute, then, it would display as an 'unformatted' volume. It is like
    >the file allocation table (or whatever NTFS uses to index the files) is
    >scrambled. Each time it occurs, they had been reformatting the drive which
    >fixes this for a while.


    That sounds more like an electronics failure than the drive itself.
    First thing to check would be the cables - intermittent cables can
    often cause this sort of problem. Presuming that it is an IDE drive
    inside an external USB case, then the cable most likely to be a
    problem is the IDE one between the USB to IDE converter and the drive.
    Stephen Worthington, Jul 12, 2004
    #13
  14. JedMeister

    JedMeister Guest

    Maybe you are right. I will tell them to try using the drive on another
    machine/cable. I found out they were daisychaining the drives too, so I
    wonder if this would cause problems.


    "Stephen Worthington" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 17:28:29 +1200, "JedMeister"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I am not 100% familiar with the failure, but I think the drive would be

    OK
    > >one minute, then, it would display as an 'unformatted' volume. It is like
    > >the file allocation table (or whatever NTFS uses to index the files) is
    > >scrambled. Each time it occurs, they had been reformatting the drive

    which
    > >fixes this for a while.

    >
    > That sounds more like an electronics failure than the drive itself.
    > First thing to check would be the cables - intermittent cables can
    > often cause this sort of problem. Presuming that it is an IDE drive
    > inside an external USB case, then the cable most likely to be a
    > problem is the IDE one between the USB to IDE converter and the drive.
    JedMeister, Jul 12, 2004
    #14
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