extending the range of a wireless network

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by yawnmoth, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. yawnmoth

    yawnmoth Guest

    Linksys sells wireless repeaters:

    http://www.shoplinksys.com/viewproduct.htm?productId=53934613

    Netgear sells improved antenna's:

    http://www.netgear.com/Products/APsWirelessControllers/AntennasandCables.aspx

    Which one would I want if I wanted to extend the range of my wireless
    network? The thing I worry about with the antenna's is this: that
    although that'll improve the routers ability to read packets that it
    won't improve it's ability to send them out. ie. if I got an antenna,
    I'd actually need two - one for the router and one for device
    connecting to the router.

    Also, I have a PCMCIA wireless card that can have antennas plugged
    into it and haven't really noticed much discernible difference when
    antenna's are plugged into it. I plug in a 7 dBI omni directional
    antenna, don't seem to be able to see any new access points, and then
    plug in a 14 dBI directional antenna and again don't seem to be able
    to see any new access points.

    Of course, then again, I'm not really sure how one would best go about
    evaluating an antenna. It seems like maybe a good way would be to
    create snapshots of the access points you can see. ie. dump the
    access points you can see without an antenna to a text file, dump
    those you can see with an omnidirectional antenna to a text file, and
    dump those you can see with a more powerful directional antenna to a
    text file. Then just do a diff between them and see which access
    points are common to all text files and which ones aren't.
    Unfortunately, I'm not really sure how to do that. Any ideas?
     
    yawnmoth, Sep 30, 2009
    #1
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  2. Hi
    Wireless behaves differently in each environment.
    Boosting it with Antenna usually work well outdoor when there is clean view
    between the source and the client.
    It does not do much indoor.
    Here are the common methods use to Boost WIFI. Read and try to judge which
    method would do well in your environment.
    Extending Distance - http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
    Wireless Modes - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Modes.html
    Wireless Bridging - http://www.ezlan.net/bridging.html
    Hi Gain Antenna - http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking).

    "yawnmoth" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Linksys sells wireless repeaters:
    >
    > http://www.shoplinksys.com/viewproduct.htm?productId=53934613
    >
    > Netgear sells improved antenna's:
    >
    > http://www.netgear.com/Products/APsWirelessControllers/AntennasandCables.aspx
    >
    > Which one would I want if I wanted to extend the range of my wireless
    > network? The thing I worry about with the antenna's is this: that
    > although that'll improve the routers ability to read packets that it
    > won't improve it's ability to send them out. ie. if I got an antenna,
    > I'd actually need two - one for the router and one for device
    > connecting to the router.
    >
    > Also, I have a PCMCIA wireless card that can have antennas plugged
    > into it and haven't really noticed much discernible difference when
    > antenna's are plugged into it. I plug in a 7 dBI omni directional
    > antenna, don't seem to be able to see any new access points, and then
    > plug in a 14 dBI directional antenna and again don't seem to be able
    > to see any new access points.
    >
    > Of course, then again, I'm not really sure how one would best go about
    > evaluating an antenna. It seems like maybe a good way would be to
    > create snapshots of the access points you can see. ie. dump the
    > access points you can see without an antenna to a text file, dump
    > those you can see with an omnidirectional antenna to a text file, and
    > dump those you can see with a more powerful directional antenna to a
    > text file. Then just do a diff between them and see which access
    > points are common to all text files and which ones aren't.
    > Unfortunately, I'm not really sure how to do that. Any ideas?
     
    Jack [MVP-Networking], Oct 1, 2009
    #2
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