Explaining "Terabytes" to Management

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. I wonder if they add more dolls over time ...

    <http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/geekend/?p=880&tag=rbxccnbtr1>
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 19, 2008
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Gordon Guest

    On 2008-04-19, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote:
    > I wonder if they add more dolls over time ...
    >

    Of course, Petra is next. ;-)

    ><http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/geekend/?p=880&tag=rbxccnbtr1>
    Gordon, Apr 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 15:08:06 +1200, thingy <>
    wrote:

    >Gordon wrote:
    >> On 2008-04-19, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote:
    >>> I wonder if they add more dolls over time ...
    >>>

    >> Of course, Petra is next. ;-)
    >>
    >>> <http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/geekend/?p=880&tag=rbxccnbtr1>

    >
    >Thats easy....try explaining to management that the 270TB SAN disk array
    >they bought to last 5 years was, yes 270TB RAW but 160TB formatted....ie
    >usable...and will last 2years if they are lucky....
    >
    >Then try and explain disk IOPS...and why ripping out a metalun of 2 x
    >(R5)5 x 146 15k rpm disks in a raid5 (is for speed) and that replacing
    >these 10 spindles with 2 x 1TB SATA disks in a raid1....is REALLY bad
    >for Exchange or a database performance.......
    >
    >This explains why my job has sucked somewhat for the last 6months...


    So it's only a small amount of data you need to store then.
    When reading that article above I spotted a link to this article
    http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/geekend/?p=1260#comments

    It produces 1.8 gigabytes of data per second!

    More info at
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Hadron_Collider

    and this from
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CERN

    The Large Hadron Collider

    Main article: Large Hadron Collider

    Construction of the CMS detector for LHC at CERN
    Construction of the CMS detector for LHC at CERN

    Most of the activities at CERN are currently directed towards building
    a new collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the experiments
    for it. The LHC represents a large-scale, worldwide scientific
    cooperation project. Physics experiments are expected to start May
    2008, delayed due to an inner triplet magnet assembly failing a
    pressure test in March 2007[4][5].

    The LHC tunnel is located 100 metres underground, in the region
    between the Geneva airport and the nearby Jura mountains. It uses the
    27 km circumference circular tunnel previously occupied by LEP which
    was closed down in November 2000. CERN's existing PS/SPS accelerator
    complexes will be used to pre-accelerate protons which will then be
    injected into the LHC.

    Six experiments (CMS, ATLAS, LHCb, TOTEM, LHC-forward and ALICE) are
    currently being built, and will be running on the collider; each of
    them will study particle collisions under a different point of view,
    and with different technologies. Construction for these experiments
    required an extraordinary engineering effort. Just as an example, to
    lower the pieces for the CMS experiment into the underground cavern
    which will host it, a special crane will have to be rented from
    Belgium, which will be able to lift the almost 2000 tons for each
    piece. The first of the approximately 5,000 magnets necessary for
    construction was lowered down a special shaft at 13:00 GMT on 7 March
    2005.

    This accelerator will generate vast quantities of computer data, which
    CERN will stream to laboratories around the world for distributed
    processing (the GRID technology). In April 2005, a trial successfully
    streamed 600 MB per second to seven different sites across the world.
    If all the data generated by the LHC is to be analysed, then
    scientists must achieve 1,800 MB per second before 2008.
    Craig Shore, Apr 23, 2008
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Squiggle Guest

    Rob Simpson wrote:
    > On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 22:13:27 +1200, Craig Shore propped his eyelids open
    > with toothpicks and wrote:
    >
    >> So it's only a small amount of data you need to store then. When reading
    >> that article above I spotted a link to this article
    >> http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/geekend/?p=1260#comments
    >>
    >> It produces 1.8 gigabytes of data per second!
    >>
    >> More info at
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Hadron_Collider
    >>
    >> and this from
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CERN
    >>
    >> The Large Hadron Collider
    >>
    >> Main article: Large Hadron Collider
    >>
    >> Construction of the CMS detector for LHC at CERN Construction of the CMS
    >> detector for LHC at CERN
    >>
    >> Most of the activities at CERN are currently directed towards building a
    >> new collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the experiments for
    >> it. The LHC represents a large-scale, worldwide scientific cooperation
    >> project. Physics experiments are expected to start May 2008, delayed due
    >> to an inner triplet magnet assembly failing a pressure test in March
    >> 2007[4][5].
    >>
    >> The LHC tunnel is located 100 metres underground, in the region between
    >> the Geneva airport and the nearby Jura mountains. It uses the 27 km
    >> circumference circular tunnel previously occupied by LEP which was
    >> closed down in November 2000. CERN's existing PS/SPS accelerator
    >> complexes will be used to pre-accelerate protons which will then be
    >> injected into the LHC.
    >>
    >> Six experiments (CMS, ATLAS, LHCb, TOTEM, LHC-forward and ALICE) are
    >> currently being built, and will be running on the collider; each of them
    >> will study particle collisions under a different point of view, and with
    >> different technologies. Construction for these experiments required an
    >> extraordinary engineering effort. Just as an example, to lower the
    >> pieces for the CMS experiment into the underground cavern which will
    >> host it, a special crane will have to be rented from Belgium, which will
    >> be able to lift the almost 2000 tons for each piece. The first of the
    >> approximately 5,000 magnets necessary for construction was lowered down
    >> a special shaft at 13:00 GMT on 7 March 2005.
    >>
    >> This accelerator will generate vast quantities of computer data, which
    >> CERN will stream to laboratories around the world for distributed
    >> processing (the GRID technology). In April 2005, a trial successfully
    >> streamed 600 MB per second to seven different sites across the world. If
    >> all the data generated by the LHC is to be analysed, then scientists
    >> must achieve 1,800 MB per second before 2008.

    >
    >
    > I watched a doco on the building of the collider on Nat Geo channel last
    > year. It showed the larger elements being lowered by those cranes, but
    > there was no mention of the computers they'll need to crunch the numbers.
    > 1.8 Terabytes/sec is going to take some grunt.
    >
    >

    But 1.8Gbytes is a bit more acheivable, and last time i checked 1,800
    Mbyte was ~1.8Gbyte.
    Southern cross cable can handle at least 480Gbit/s so the technology
    isn't exactly a problem, just the funding and logistics.
    Squiggle, Apr 27, 2008
    #4
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