Explaining DVD to a newbie?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by John, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. John

    John Guest

    Hi. I just wondered if anyone can help me? I am trying to write a
    small email for my father to explain DVD to him in very simple terms.

    He has recently bought a combination VHS/DVD Player from a well known
    large place selling goods like this in the UK. It was not what he
    wanted though and I believe that either the salesperson pulled a fast
    one on him and sold him the wrong thing, or he just got confused and
    asked for a DVD-R with the salesperson thinking he wanted a player
    compatible with recordable formats? Either way he actually wanted a
    DVD that can record.

    So far I have put together the following in as simple language as I
    can. I have removed the hyperlinks to the site that was underneath the
    info, I didn't want anyone to think I was spamming for that electrical
    store.

    Thanks for any suggestion to what I have already put:



    FYI: The xxxxxx xxxxxx site has some good info on DVD Recorders and
    Players and the different types.

    For a DVD Recorder you are going to be looking at a price of about
    £100.

    For a DVD Recorder with built in Hard Drive (useful if you are on
    holiday for a long time) you would be looking at a price of about £220
    minimum.

    There's not really much point in getting a combination VHS/DVD unit as
    VHS became pretty much redundant 3 years ago in 2003, and the more
    parts you have inside a machine the more things are likely to go wrong
    with it. It is usually always best to get a stand-alone product. If
    you did want to get a combination VHS/DVD Recorder the cheapest price
    it would cost you would be about £150.

    DVD though is a widescreen format and to get the best use out of a DVD
    Player or Recorder you really need to have the best quality Widescreen
    Television you can afford.



    Can you think of anything else to add to this? And is this good
    simple advice for someone who knows nothing about DVD? I put the last
    bit because he doesn't have a widescreen telly, he just has a cheap
    25" 4:3 one.

    Cheers

    John
     
    John, Jan 29, 2006
    #1
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  2. John

    Cardman Guest

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 08:43:18 +0000, John <> wrote:

    >Hi. I just wondered if anyone can help me? I am trying to write a
    >small email for my father to explain DVD to him in very simple terms.
    >
    >He has recently bought a combination VHS/DVD Player from a well known
    >large place selling goods like this in the UK. It was not what he
    >wanted though and I believe that either the salesperson pulled a fast
    >one on him and sold him the wrong thing, or he just got confused and
    >asked for a DVD-R with the salesperson thinking he wanted a player
    >compatible with recordable formats? Either way he actually wanted a
    >DVD that can record.


    Under UK trading law then so does your father have a "few days" in
    which to reject the item (for any reason) and to return it to the
    store for a full refund.

    In other words, since this device was not what he wanted, then the
    earlier he returns it the better.

    Having the store exchange it for the correct item would assist in
    their cooperation, but since he has already walked away with the wrong
    item once, then it would be better if you assisted in obtaining a
    suitable model on his behalf.

    >So far I have put together the following in as simple language as I
    >can. I have removed the hyperlinks to the site that was underneath the
    >info, I didn't want anyone to think I was spamming for that electrical
    >store.
    >
    >Thanks for any suggestion to what I have already put:
    >
    >
    >
    >FYI: The xxxxxx xxxxxx site has some good info on DVD Recorders and
    >Players and the different types.
    >
    >For a DVD Recorder you are going to be looking at a price of about
    >£100.


    A cheap DVD recorder then. It is best to avoid high street stores if
    he wishes to obtain a good price.

    >For a DVD Recorder with built in Hard Drive (useful if you are on
    >holiday for a long time) you would be looking at a price of about £220
    >minimum.
    >
    >There's not really much point in getting a combination VHS/DVD unit as
    >VHS became pretty much redundant 3 years ago in 2003, and the more
    >parts you have inside a machine the more things are likely to go wrong
    >with it. It is usually always best to get a stand-alone product. If
    >you did want to get a combination VHS/DVD Recorder the cheapest price
    >it would cost you would be about £150.
    >
    >DVD though is a widescreen format and to get the best use out of a DVD
    >Player or Recorder you really need to have the best quality Widescreen
    >Television you can afford.


    In my case I spent a long time trying to figure out if I should go for
    a 16:9 or a 4:3 rear projection TV. I decided in the end to get a 61"
    4:3 model when even now most TV programming is in 4:3 mode.

    My TV however supports a widescreen mode in that I can display a
    widescreen picture to a size of 56".

    The other reason I decided on a 4:3 model is that most movies are not
    actually recorded in the 16:9 model. As in the Hollywood's way of
    always trying to avoid the home use format then so are most of my DVDs
    actually in the 2.35:1 mode. In other words even with a widescreen TV
    you would still have black bars top and bottom.

    The main thing that you overlook in your father's case is that any
    reasonable DVD model will always support widescreen, letterbox and pan
    & scan display modes. So no matter what the shape of the TV then the
    DVD player will support a mode that he would be happy with.

    So it is best to avoid all TV replacement advice.

    >Can you think of anything else to add to this? And is this good
    >simple advice for someone who knows nothing about DVD? I put the last
    >bit because he doesn't have a widescreen telly, he just has a cheap
    >25" 4:3 one.


    A 25" CRT model is bound to be fairly expensive. And as I said he can
    play DVDs on his 4:3 model just fine.

    Anyway, if he does not want that DVD + VCR model, and I would
    recommend getting rid of it, then tell him to return it to the store
    in it's original packaging *urgently*.

    As if he keeps it beyond the allowed "few days" then the store then
    has a right to reject his return. They may charge him a restocking fee
    if he returns it in a condition below what he got it as, like in the
    case of removing it from the box, but as they sold him the wrong item
    in the first place then so should he press them to cover their own
    mistake.

    All he needs to do to find a replacement is to make sure that it is a
    "DVD recorder". However, since the ideal model can be somewhat
    technical to describe, then that is why I said that you should
    directly assist him in this purchase.

    Or just buy him a magazine with DVD recorder comparison review and to
    tell him to buy the winner.

    Cardman
    http://www.cardman.org
    http://www.cardman.com
    http://www.cardman.co.uk
     
    Cardman, Jan 29, 2006
    #2
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  3. On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 08:43:18 +0000, John <> wrote:

    >He has recently bought a combination VHS/DVD Player from a well known
    >large place selling goods like this in the UK. It was not what he
    >wanted though and I believe that either the salesperson pulled a fast
    >one on him and sold him the wrong thing, or he just got confused and
    >asked for a DVD-R with the salesperson thinking he wanted a player
    >compatible with recordable formats? Either way he actually wanted a
    >DVD that can record.


    Why do people get all coy over mentioning names? Currys? Dixons?
    (same company anyway). Anyway, if he takes it back promptly they'll
    swap it. He may have a little trouble if he wants his money back
    instead.
     
    Laurence Payne, Jan 29, 2006
    #3
  4. John

    John Russell Guest

    "Laurence Payne" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 08:43:18 +0000, John <> wrote:
    >
    >>He has recently bought a combination VHS/DVD Player from a well known
    >>large place selling goods like this in the UK. It was not what he
    >>wanted though and I believe that either the salesperson pulled a fast
    >>one on him and sold him the wrong thing, or he just got confused and
    >>asked for a DVD-R with the salesperson thinking he wanted a player
    >>compatible with recordable formats? Either way he actually wanted a
    >>DVD that can record.

    >
    > Why do people get all coy over mentioning names? Currys? Dixons?
    > (same company anyway). Anyway, if he takes it back promptly they'll
    > swap it. He may have a little trouble if he wants his money back
    > instead.


    And I wouldn't be surprised if the salesperson actually believed it recorded
    to DVD!

    Good's have to be fit for purpose, but that's usually interpreted as does
    what it says on the box. How do you prove your requirements where different?
    I doubt anyone goes around with their own spec list on a piece of paper
    demanding the shop's stamps the thing to confirm the goods sold match's it.
    Perhaps we should. That's how big companies make major purchases.
     
    John Russell, Jan 29, 2006
    #4
  5. John <> wrote:

    >... or he just got confused and
    >asked for a DVD-R with the salesperson thinking he wanted a player
    >compatible with recordable formats? Either way he actually wanted a
    >DVD that can record.


    Dunno. It's good enough for a small telly, if that's what he's happy
    with. And it gives him the chance to wait for Freeview DVD recorders to
    come down to a sensible price before the analogue switch-off.

    But if he really did want a DVD recorder and you're not putting words in
    his mouth, ask him to be careful what terms he uses when he goes back to
    the shop. He might have asked for a "DVD player that can record" which
    might confuse some shop assistants - so make sure that he knows to ask
    for a "DVD recorder"

    >...
    >For a DVD Recorder with built in Hard Drive (useful if you are on
    >holiday for a long time) you would be looking at a price of about £220
    >minimum.


    If he doesn't know anything about DVD recorders, I'd guess that the
    above would be confusing.

    Speak to him on the phone first. Try to keep it simple and bear in mind
    that you don't have to explain about everything available. When you're
    talking to the technically disinclined, don't spout a monologue, but as
    you give each piece of information, say it in a way that requires a
    response so that you can surreptitiously test how well it was
    understood.

    Maybe the first thing that you need to mention is that there are various
    types of blank DVD disk (+/-, re-recordable, write-once, etc). He
    doesn't have to remember it all, so long as he knows that he must get
    the type of blank that matches his recorder.

    As for hard drive, explain that HD is the buzzword to look for if he
    wants an expensive recorder that can store tens of hours of television
    inside it without having to use blank DVDs. If he's interested, he needs
    to check how many hours a given unit will record (and don't mention
    gigabytes).

    *Then* tell him that you'll follow up with an email about the things
    that he said he was interested in so that he's got it as a reminder.

    >There's not really much point in getting a combination VHS/DVD unit as
    >VHS became pretty much redundant 3 years ago in 2003, and the more
    >parts you have inside a machine the more things are likely to go wrong
    >with it. It is usually always best to get a stand-alone product. If
    >you did want to get a combination VHS/DVD Recorder the cheapest price
    >it would cost you would be about £150.


    He can buy a pack of blank tapes which should last for the life of the
    recorder, and he'd got the DVD player for rented films. Dunno. I've seen
    some fairly cheap ones, and you only expect that sort of product to last
    a few years anyway.

    >DVD though is a widescreen format and to get the best use out of a DVD
    >Player or Recorder you really need to have the best quality Widescreen
    >Television you can afford.


    Is that in his interest or yours when you're visiting him? ;-)
    DVD-recorders record the telly in 4:3, and that might be the main thing
    he's interested in. (Unless it's one of those expensive Freeview
    recorders, which he needn't worry about unless he's in the Border region
    where the switch-off is scheduled for 2008).

    --
    Dave Farrance
     
    Dave Farrance, Jan 29, 2006
    #5
  6. On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 12:29:08 -0000, "John Russell"
    <> wrote:

    >> Why do people get all coy over mentioning names? Currys? Dixons?
    >> (same company anyway). Anyway, if he takes it back promptly they'll
    >> swap it. He may have a little trouble if he wants his money back
    >> instead.

    >
    >And I wouldn't be surprised if the salesperson actually believed it recorded
    >to DVD!
    >
    >Good's have to be fit for purpose, but that's usually interpreted as does
    >what it says on the box. How do you prove your requirements where different?
    >I doubt anyone goes around with their own spec list on a piece of paper
    >demanding the shop's stamps the thing to confirm the goods sold match's it.
    >Perhaps we should. That's how big companies make major purchases.



    In practice, the chain stores will accepting a return on the grounds
    "it wasn't what I wanted". Don't waste time sweet-talking the
    assistant. He doesn't care. Either he's authorised to swap or he
    isn't. You'll find he is.
     
    Laurence Payne, Jan 29, 2006
    #6
  7. In article <43dcb564$>,
    John Russell <> wrote:
    > Goods have to be fit for purpose, but that's usually interpreted as does
    > what it says on the box. How do you prove your requirements where different?
    > I doubt anyone goes around with their own spec list on a piece of paper
    > demanding the shop's stamps the thing to confirm the goods sold match's it.
    > Perhaps we should. That's how big companies make major purchases.


    A verbal contract is sufficient except where land and Intellectual Property is
    concerned. Take a tape recorder if you're worried about them denying the
    contract.

    --
    John Cartmell john@ followed by finnybank.com 0845 006 8822
    Qercus magazine FAX +44 (0)8700-519-527 www.finnybank.com
    Qercus - the best guide to RISC OS computing
     
    John Cartmell, Jan 29, 2006
    #7
  8. John

    ama terasu Guest

    In message <>, John
    <> writes
    >Hi. I just wondered if anyone can help me? I am trying to write a
    >small email for my father to explain DVD to him in very simple terms.


    Snipped....

    Having browsed the various responses to your post, I'd suggest that you
    Keep It Simple (you did use the term "simple"). I'd suggest that you
    tell your father to:

    1. Take it back to the shop, and tell them that he asked for a
    DVD recorder but was sold a DVD player.

    2. Ask for either (his choice) a refund, or an exchange for a DVD
    recorder (with an appropriate payment to make up the price).

    3. If the sales person seems reluctant to do anything, don't beat
    around the bush - ask to see the manager. In many retail
    chains, sales persons aren't permitted to authorise refunds -
    only the manager is allowed to authorise that.

    I'd suggest that he goes for the refund, then hot-foot it down to his
    nearest Asda, and purchase a Cyberhome DVR 1600 at about £68. And while
    he's there, pick up one or two 5-packs of DVD+RW at about £4. Aldi also
    sell 5-packs of DVD+RW for the same price.

    If he has some VHS tapes that he'd like to transfer to DVD, the he
    should connect his VHS SCART to the input SCART on the Cyberhome, use
    the 'Select Source' to select the VHS, and transfer his VHS tapes to DVD
    (the Cyberhome user guide give a connection diagram and simple
    instructions).

    --
    Tony Morgan
     
    ama terasu, Jan 29, 2006
    #8
  9. John

    John Russell Guest

    "John Cartmell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <43dcb564$>,
    > John Russell <> wrote:
    >> Goods have to be fit for purpose, but that's usually interpreted as does
    >> what it says on the box. How do you prove your requirements where
    >> different?
    >> I doubt anyone goes around with their own spec list on a piece of paper
    >> demanding the shop's stamps the thing to confirm the goods sold match's
    >> it.
    >> Perhaps we should. That's how big companies make major purchases.

    >
    > A verbal contract is sufficient except where land and Intellectual
    > Property is
    > concerned. Take a tape recorder if you're worried about them denying the
    > contract.
    >


    At last a use for the mic record mode on my Zen!
     
    John Russell, Jan 29, 2006
    #9
  10. John

    Stan Brown Guest

    Sun, 29 Jan 2006 08:43:18 +0000 from John <>:
    > There's not really much point in getting a combination VHS/DVD unit as
    > VHS became pretty much redundant 3 years ago in 2003, and the more
    > parts you have inside a machine the more things are likely to go wrong
    > with it. It is usually always best to get a stand-alone product.


    I don't think it's as open and shut as you make it. A combo unit can
    be an excellent way to transfer treasured tapes to DVD.

    If your father has no VHS to transfer to DVD, and never intends
    renting or buying or borrowing another VHS tape, then for his
    specific use I would agree.

    > DVD though is a widescreen format and to get the best use out of a DVD
    > Player or Recorder you really need to have the best quality Widescreen
    > Television you can afford.


    I disagree with this, rather strenuously.

    First, DVD is no more a "widescreen format" than VHS or broadcast.
    The choice of full screen or wide screen is completely independent of
    the choice of media. Widescreen isn't intrinsically better; it's
    better when the original source material was created in widescreen. A
    widescreen TV adds nothing to /All About Eve/ or inner at Eight/ or
    /Witness for the Prosecution/.

    A widescreen TV might be a good choice if he's in the market for a
    new TV, but it is by no means a necessity "to get the best use out of
    a DVD player or recorder".

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com/
    DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
    other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
     
    Stan Brown, Jan 29, 2006
    #10
  11. John

    Cardman Guest

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 13:55:13 +0000, Laurence Payne
    <> wrote:

    >In practice, the chain stores will accepting a return on the grounds
    >"it wasn't what I wanted". Don't waste time sweet-talking the
    >assistant. He doesn't care. Either he's authorised to swap or he
    >isn't. You'll find he is.


    And if he still won't be issued a refund then try this trick.

    Just stand there and say nothing with a mean look on your face while
    the manager/sales person continues to talk away. As soon enough this
    person would become quite uncomfortable with this hostile and
    unresponsive pose and agree to a refund simply to end this situation.

    You will find that making the other person feel very uncomfortable
    normally works like a charm.

    Not that there should be the need in this case mind you.

    Cardman
    http://www.cardman.org
    http://www.cardman.com
    http://www.cardman.co.uk
     
    Cardman, Jan 29, 2006
    #11
  12. John

    David Taylor Guest

    Dave Farrance <> wrote on Sun, 29 Jan 2006 13:01:17 GMT:
    >
    > As for hard drive, explain that HD is the buzzword to look for if he
    > wants an expensive recorder that can store tens of hours of television
    > inside it without having to use blank DVDs. If he's interested, he needs
    > to check how many hours a given unit will record (and don't mention
    > gigabytes).


    "HD" is more likely to be a buzzword for "High Definition"....

    --
    David Taylor
     
    David Taylor, Jan 29, 2006
    #12
  13. John

    ThePunisher Guest

    "Cardman" <> wrote in message
    news:
    >
    > In my case I spent a long time trying to figure out if I should go for
    > a 16:9 or a 4:3 rear projection TV. I decided in the end to get a 61"
    > 4:3 model when even now most TV programming is in 4:3 mode.
    >


    And what programming would that be then?

    --
    ThePunisher
     
    ThePunisher, Jan 29, 2006
    #13
  14. John

    James Guest

    "Stan Brown" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sun, 29 Jan 2006 08:43:18 +0000 from John <>:
    >> There's not really much point in getting a combination VHS/DVD unit as
    >> VHS became pretty much redundant 3 years ago in 2003, and the more
    >> parts you have inside a machine the more things are likely to go wrong
    >> with it. It is usually always best to get a stand-alone product.

    >
    > I don't think it's as open and shut as you make it. A combo unit can
    > be an excellent way to transfer treasured tapes to DVD.
    >
    > If your father has no VHS to transfer to DVD, and never intends
    > renting or buying or borrowing another VHS tape, then for his
    > specific use I would agree.


    Unless the dvd player in the combo unit is not a recording dvd unit. In
    that case you would only be able to backup un-protected dvd's to vhs unless
    you were to connect a recorder via scart.
     
    James, Jan 29, 2006
    #14
  15. "David Taylor" <> wrote:

    >Dave Farrance <> wrote on Sun, 29 Jan 2006 13:01:17 GMT:
    >>
    >> As for hard drive, explain that HD is the buzzword to look for if he
    >> wants an expensive recorder that can store tens of hours of television
    >> inside it without having to use blank DVDs. If he's interested, he needs
    >> to check how many hours a given unit will record (and don't mention
    >> gigabytes).

    >
    >"HD" is more likely to be a buzzword for "High Definition"....


    Whoops. I'd seen HD included in the part numbers and marked on the front
    of some early hard-disk recorders, but yes, it means hi-def exclusively
    now.

    --
    Dave Farrance
     
    Dave Farrance, Jan 29, 2006
    #15
  16. On Sun, 29 Jan 2006 10:56:22 -0500, Stan Brown
    <> wrote:

    >A widescreen TV might be a good choice if he's in the market for a
    >new TV, but it is by no means a necessity "to get the best use out of
    >a DVD player or recorder".


    Look at the actual picture sizes of widescreen units. Are you buying
    a 4:3 but wider? Or a 4:3 but shorter?
     
    Laurence Payne, Jan 30, 2006
    #16
  17. John

    Jordan Guest

    John wrote:
    > Hi. I just wondered if anyone can help me? I am trying to write a
    > small email for my father to explain DVD to him in very simple terms.


    Does he know what CDs are? Then it's easy...

    "It's just like a CD only for movies instead of music."

    - Jordan
     
    Jordan, Jan 30, 2006
    #17
  18. John

    Sanddancer Guest

    It might be best for you to check out the stores website and chose the
    product that best suits him. That way when he goes back he can just
    ask to swap the miss-sold item for it and there shouldn't be anymore
    confusion.

    It'll save the salesperson from reading all the cards in front of the
    DVD recorders to him trying to sound like they know what they're
    talking about.

    Sanddancer
     
    Sanddancer, Jan 31, 2006
    #18
  19. John

    MikeS Guest

    "ama terasu" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > In message <>, John
    > <> writes
    >>Hi. I just wondered if anyone can help me? I am trying to write a small
    >>email for my father to explain DVD to him in very simple terms.

    >
    > Snipped....
    >
    > Having browsed the various responses to your post, I'd suggest that you
    > Keep It Simple (you did use the term "simple"). I'd suggest that you tell
    > your father to:
    >
    > 1. Take it back to the shop, and tell them that he asked for a
    > DVD recorder but was sold a DVD player.
    >
    > 2. Ask for either (his choice) a refund, or an exchange for a DVD
    > recorder (with an appropriate payment to make up the price).
    >
    > 3. If the sales person seems reluctant to do anything, don't beat
    > around the bush - ask to see the manager. In many retail
    > chains, sales persons aren't permitted to authorise refunds -
    > only the manager is allowed to authorise that.
    >
    > I'd suggest that he goes for the refund, then hot-foot it down to his
    > nearest Asda, and purchase a Cyberhome DVR 1600 at about £68. And while
    > he's there, pick up one or two 5-packs of DVD+RW at about £4. Aldi also
    > sell 5-packs of DVD+RW for the same price.
    >
    > If he has some VHS tapes that he'd like to transfer to DVD, the he should
    > connect his VHS SCART to the input SCART on the Cyberhome, use the 'Select
    > Source' to select the VHS, and transfer his VHS tapes to DVD (the
    > Cyberhome user guide give a connection diagram and simple instructions).
    >
    > --
    > Tony Morgan

    Cyberhome record on DVD-RW I have found as well DVD+rw
     
    MikeS, Mar 5, 2006
    #19
  20. John

    harrogate2 Guest

    "MikeS" <mikesansom@hotmail .com> wrote in message
    news:QbHOf.30810$...
    >
    > "ama terasu" <> wrote in message
    > news:D...
    > > In message <>, John
    > > <> writes
    > >>Hi. I just wondered if anyone can help me? I am trying to write

    a small
    > >>email for my father to explain DVD to him in very simple terms.

    > >
    > > Snipped....
    > >
    > > Having browsed the various responses to your post, I'd suggest

    that you
    > > Keep It Simple (you did use the term "simple"). I'd suggest that

    you tell
    > > your father to:
    > >
    > > 1. Take it back to the shop, and tell them that he asked for a
    > > DVD recorder but was sold a DVD player.
    > >
    > > 2. Ask for either (his choice) a refund, or an exchange for a DVD
    > > recorder (with an appropriate payment to make up the price).
    > >
    > > 3. If the sales person seems reluctant to do anything, don't beat
    > > around the bush - ask to see the manager. In many retail
    > > chains, sales persons aren't permitted to authorise refunds -
    > > only the manager is allowed to authorise that.
    > >
    > > I'd suggest that he goes for the refund, then hot-foot it down to

    his
    > > nearest Asda, and purchase a Cyberhome DVR 1600 at about £68. And

    while
    > > he's there, pick up one or two 5-packs of DVD+RW at about £4. Aldi

    also
    > > sell 5-packs of DVD+RW for the same price.
    > >
    > > If he has some VHS tapes that he'd like to transfer to DVD, the he

    should
    > > connect his VHS SCART to the input SCART on the Cyberhome, use the

    'Select
    > > Source' to select the VHS, and transfer his VHS tapes to DVD (the
    > > Cyberhome user guide give a connection diagram and simple

    instructions).
    > >
    > > --
    > > Tony Morgan

    > Cyberhome record on DVD-RW I have found as well DVD+rw
    >
    >


    Whilst the Cyberhome is undoubtedly a good price I have had two with
    the same problem. The first I set the chapter markers (i.e. index) to
    be placed every 5 minutes: in a 64 minute recording it managed to
    place 98 markers. Checking the recording showed it to have lots of
    freezes with blocks missing (I reckon it didn't start recording until
    25 secs into the prog) and a new chapter started each time it got
    going again.

    Took it back, got another. Picture also acceptable but prone to
    freezing and jumping like the first although somehow it managed to get
    the chapters correct (only a short recording.)

    Took it back and got a refund.

    Am now looking at the Panasonic DMRES20D which is £139.95 at Richer
    Sounds (region 2 only version.) This will , for some reason, not write
    to DVD+RW discs but will to others and to DVD-RAM. It has both
    analogue and digital tuners.
    Beware that Richers seem to find the region 2 model hard to find and
    will try to sell you the multi-region version for £20 more - still a
    lot cheaper than anywhere else.

    I also note that the Philips 3305 at £129.95 gets very good reviews
    and whilst being single region will write to all types of disc, well
    almost. It is bettered only by some of the Lite-On machines which will
    record music CDs as well.


    --
    Woody

    harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com
     
    harrogate2, Mar 5, 2006
    #20
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