Every Proprietary Company Goes Bad Eventually

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. This time it’s the turn of Opera
    <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/24/opera_mini_and_china/>, to plug a
    “hole†that allowed its Chinese customers to evade Government censorship of
    the Internet.

    Every company, at some point, is going to be tempted to prioritize its own
    interests over those of its customers. When this happens with proprietary
    software, you’re screwed. Free Software is your defence.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 25, 2009
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    On Nov 25, 11:01 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    > This time it’s the turn of Opera
    > <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/24/opera_mini_and_china/>, to plug a
    > “hole” that allowed its Chinese customers to evade Government censorship of
    > the Internet.
    >
    > Every company, at some point, is going to be tempted to prioritize its own
    > interests over those of its customers. When this happens with proprietary
    > software, you’re screwed. Free Software is your defence.


    Opera no doubt faced having its compression servers outside China
    firewalled.

    There is going to be increasing political pressure to regulate
    internet access. Stopping kiddie porn provides a very plausible excuse
    for this.
    peterwn, Nov 25, 2009
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    peterwn wrote:
    > On Nov 25, 11:01 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >> This time it’s the turn of Opera
    >> <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/11/24/opera_mini_and_china/>, to plug a
    >> “hole” that allowed its Chinese customers to evade Government censorship of
    >> the Internet.
    >>
    >> Every company, at some point, is going to be tempted to prioritize its own
    >> interests over those of its customers. When this happens with proprietary
    >> software, you’re screwed. Free Software is your defence.

    >
    > Opera no doubt faced having its compression servers outside China
    > firewalled.
    >
    > There is going to be increasing political pressure to regulate
    > internet access. Stopping kiddie porn provides a very plausible excuse
    > for this.


    So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    proprietary vs free software at all.
    victor, Nov 25, 2009
    #3
  4. In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:

    > So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    > proprietary vs free software at all.


    Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    that used Chinese-based servers.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 26, 2009
    #4
  5. In message <>, Allistar wrote:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>
    >>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>> proprietary vs free software at all.

    >>
    >> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    >> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    >> that used Chinese-based servers.

    >
    > What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The exact
    > same issue could happen with an open source browser.


    No it couldn’t.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 26, 2009
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    Allistar wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>
    >>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>> proprietary vs free software at all.

    >> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    >> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    >> that used Chinese-based servers.

    >
    > What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The exact
    > same issue could happen with an open source browser.


    Dear Usenet, I have no idea how someone could change the code of an open
    source application to suit their needs.
    Sailor Sam, Nov 26, 2009
    #6
  7. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <heko1o$mlm$-september.org>,
    > Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >
    >> Allistar wrote:
    >>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    >>>> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    >>>> that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The exact
    >>> same issue could happen with an open source browser.

    >> Dear Usenet, I have no idea how someone could change the code of an open
    >> source application to suit their needs.

    >
    > Dear Usenet, I failed to recognise that better than 95% of people who
    > own a computer are incapable of writing any code at all, thus making
    > open source no better than closed source.You may as well have given them
    > a bicycle pump, more people would have a use for it.


    And I forget that it only takes one person to change the code, and then
    distribute it to the rest of the 95%.
    (Esp. in china where there is an organised network that distributes this
    type of 'subversive' material)
    Sailor Sam, Nov 26, 2009
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <hekt3q$nqq$-september.org>,
    > Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >
    >> whoisthis wrote:
    >>> In article <heko1o$mlm$-september.org>,
    >>> Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Allistar wrote:
    >>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>>> Their browser doesnâ¤t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>>> compression
    >>>>>> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new
    >>>>>> version
    >>>>>> that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>>>> exact
    >>>>> same issue could happen with an open source browser.
    >>>> Dear Usenet, I have no idea how someone could change the code of an open
    >>>> source application to suit their needs.
    >>> Dear Usenet, I failed to recognise that better than 95% of people who
    >>> own a computer are incapable of writing any code at all, thus making
    >>> open source no better than closed source.You may as well have given them
    >>> a bicycle pump, more people would have a use for it.

    >> And I forget that it only takes one person to change the code, and then
    >> distribute it to the rest of the 95%.
    >> (Esp. in china where there is an organised network that distributes this
    >> type of 'subversive' material)

    >
    > Which is still irrelevant as that same 95% would not know how to report
    > a bug or ask for changes.



    Um, from the network they received it from???

    > Therefore for 95% of people there is no
    > discernible difference between open and closed source.



    ??????
    Pray tell, how do they ask for the illicit copy from the closed source
    vendor?

    > Equally ignored
    > is the fact that the Major developers (Redhat, Google,Novell,Intel,
    > IBM,Apple,etc) have their own agenda,



    ???????

    > and that these companies primary
    > agenda is to make money. Open source is NOT free, someone is paying for
    > it.


    ?????
    What fucking planet are you on????
    Sailor Sam, Nov 26, 2009
    #8
  9. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >
    >> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >> proprietary vs free software at all.

    >
    > Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    > servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    > that used Chinese-based servers.

    Then the users should change to an open source browser which supports
    the "alternative compression servers" of which you speak.
    I expect that whatever they do they are at the mercy of their mobile
    phone company, not Opera.
    victor, Nov 26, 2009
    #9
  10. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <hekt3q$nqq$-september.org>,
    > Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >
    >> whoisthis wrote:
    >>> In article <heko1o$mlm$-september.org>,
    >>> Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Allistar wrote:
    >>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>>> Their browser doesnâ¤t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>>> compression
    >>>>>> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new
    >>>>>> version
    >>>>>> that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>>>> exact
    >>>>> same issue could happen with an open source browser.
    >>>> Dear Usenet, I have no idea how someone could change the code of an open
    >>>> source application to suit their needs.
    >>> Dear Usenet, I failed to recognise that better than 95% of people who
    >>> own a computer are incapable of writing any code at all, thus making
    >>> open source no better than closed source.You may as well have given them
    >>> a bicycle pump, more people would have a use for it.

    >> And I forget that it only takes one person to change the code, and then
    >> distribute it to the rest of the 95%.
    >> (Esp. in china where there is an organised network that distributes this
    >> type of 'subversive' material)

    >
    > Which is still irrelevant as that same 95% would not know how to report
    > a bug or ask for changes. Therefore for 95% of people there is no
    > discernible difference between open and closed source. Equally ignored
    > is the fact that the Major developers (Redhat, Google,Novell,Intel,
    > IBM,Apple,etc) have their own agenda, and that these companies primary
    > agenda is to make money. Open source is NOT free, someone is paying for
    > it.




    There are other browsers available, the Nokia Web Browser is open source.
    http://opensource.nokia.com/projects/S60browser/
    Built on open source WebKit like the Apple Safari browser.
    That still doesn't help access Opera's compression servers, and they are
    quite entitled to control subscription services in any way they like,
    Its got nothing to do with their software licensing.
    victor, Nov 26, 2009
    #10
  11. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    Allistar wrote:
    > victor wrote:
    >
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    >>> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    >>> that used Chinese-based servers.

    >> Then the users should change to an open source browser which supports
    >> the "alternative compression servers" of which you speak.
    >> I expect that whatever they do they are at the mercy of their mobile
    >> phone company, not Opera.

    >
    > More to the point, they are at the mercy of their corrupt
    > communist/socialist government. (Then again, so are we).


    Thats news to me, I'm not having any problems with Opera Mini on my phone.
    Unlike iPhone users who are banned from using anything but Safari.
    victor, Nov 26, 2009
    #11
  12. In message <>, Allistar wrote:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >> In message <>, Allistar
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>
    >>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to
    >>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>
    >>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>> exact same issue could happen with an open source browser.

    >>
    >> No it couldn’t.

    >
    > Sure it could. An open source browser could be implemented such that there
    > is no support for alternative compression servers.


    No-one would even try.

    > Once the open source community fixes this issue, customers in China would
    > be forced to upgrade to the new version. Just like with a proprietary
    > browser.


    No-one would be “forced†to do anything—that’s the beauty of Free Software.
    I think you spend too much time with proprietary software, otherwise you
    wouldn’t think as you do.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 26, 2009
    #12
  13. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <helm05$abv$-september.org>,
    > victor <> wrote:
    >
    >> Allistar wrote:
    >>> victor wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative compression
    >>>>> servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to the new version
    >>>>> that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>> Then the users should change to an open source browser which supports
    >>>> the "alternative compression servers" of which you speak.
    >>>> I expect that whatever they do they are at the mercy of their mobile
    >>>> phone company, not Opera.
    >>> More to the point, they are at the mercy of their corrupt
    >>> communist/socialist government. (Then again, so are we).

    >> Thats news to me, I'm not having any problems with Opera Mini on my phone.
    >> Unlike iPhone users who are banned from using anything but Safari.

    >
    > Thats funny, a very quick look on the App store showed a number of
    > browsers..... did you bother to check ?


    Not Opera though.
    Why is that ? Not approved by Apple maybe ?
    victor, Nov 26, 2009
    #13
  14. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    Allistar wrote:
    > victor wrote:
    >
    >> Allistar wrote:
    >>> victor wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to
    >>>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>> Then the users should change to an open source browser which supports
    >>>> the "alternative compression servers" of which you speak.
    >>>> I expect that whatever they do they are at the mercy of their mobile
    >>>> phone company, not Opera.
    >>> More to the point, they are at the mercy of their corrupt
    >>> communist/socialist government. (Then again, so are we).

    >> Thats news to me, I'm not having any problems with Opera Mini on my phone.

    >
    > Do you live in China, and have to be surrounded by "the great firewall"?


    You were the one that claimed we are at their mercy.
    I'm saying that no government is preventing me using Opera Mini on my
    Nokia phone.
    Apple won't approve it for the app store though so I can't use it on my
    itouch

    If you connect through a cellphone you are limited by the cellphone isp
    regardless of the software on the phone.
    If there was a loophole that violated China's laws, then the connection
    would be blocked and Opera would need to use servers inside the firewall.
    ToS restrictions on mobiles are nothing new.
    victor, Nov 26, 2009
    #14
  15. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <>, Allistar wrote:
    >
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>
    >>> In message <>, Allistar
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to
    >>>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>>> exact same issue could happen with an open source browser.
    >>> No it couldn’t.

    >> Sure it could. An open source browser could be implemented such that there
    >> is no support for alternative compression servers.

    >
    > No-one would even try.
    >
    >> Once the open source community fixes this issue, customers in China would
    >> be forced to upgrade to the new version. Just like with a proprietary
    >> browser.

    >
    > No-one would be “forced†to do anything—that’s the beauty of Free Software.
    > I think you spend too much time with proprietary software, otherwise you
    > wouldn’t think as you do.


    And thats completely irrelevant.
    Symbian is free software, the nokia browser is free software, they can
    still be blocked.
    The un upgraded International version of Opera still won't connect
    because the Opera servers are blocked. The upgraded Chinese version
    connects with the firewalled servers.
    Its not an issue with proprietary code, changing the code would fix nothing.
    victor, Nov 26, 2009
    #15
  16. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    victor wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> In message <>, Allistar
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In message <>, Allistar
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to
    >>>>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>>>> exact same issue could happen with an open source browser.
    >>>> No it couldn’t.
    >>> Sure it could. An open source browser could be implemented such that
    >>> there
    >>> is no support for alternative compression servers.

    >>
    >> No-one would even try.
    >>
    >>> Once the open source community fixes this issue, customers in China
    >>> would
    >>> be forced to upgrade to the new version. Just like with a proprietary
    >>> browser.

    >>
    >> No-one would be “forced†to do anything—that’s the beauty of Free
    >> Software. I think you spend too much time with proprietary software,
    >> otherwise you wouldn’t think as you do.

    >
    > And thats completely irrelevant.
    > Symbian is free software, the nokia browser is free software, they can
    > still be blocked.
    > The un upgraded International version of Opera still won't connect
    > because the Opera servers are blocked. The upgraded Chinese version
    > connects with the firewalled servers.
    > Its not an issue with proprietary code, changing the code would fix
    > nothing.


    Changing the code to use routes that aren't firewalled, however, remains
    an option.
    Sailor Sam, Nov 26, 2009
    #16
  17. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    Allistar wrote:
    > victor wrote:
    >
    >> Allistar wrote:
    >>> victor wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Allistar wrote:
    >>>>> victor wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to
    >>>>>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>>>> Then the users should change to an open source browser which supports
    >>>>>> the "alternative compression servers" of which you speak.
    >>>>>> I expect that whatever they do they are at the mercy of their mobile
    >>>>>> phone company, not Opera.
    >>>>> More to the point, they are at the mercy of their corrupt
    >>>>> communist/socialist government. (Then again, so are we).
    >>>> Thats news to me, I'm not having any problems with Opera Mini on my
    >>>> phone.
    >>> Do you live in China, and have to be surrounded by "the great firewall"?

    >> You were the one that claimed we are at their mercy.

    >
    > By "their" I mean "our government". I wasn't referring specifically to
    > browser running on a phone, I was speaking more in general terms of the
    > unnatural power the state have over us as supposedly free people.
    >
    >> I'm saying that no government is preventing me using Opera Mini on my
    >> Nokia phone.
    >> Apple won't approve it for the app store though so I can't use it on my
    >> itouch

    >
    > Yes - that's what you get for choosing a closed platform, a platform where
    > the develop decides what runs on it and what does not. You could always
    > jailbreak it.
    >

    It wouldn't make any difference in this case, I'm sure Opera will get
    accepted eventually, its available for MacOSX.
    The page loads are noticeably quicker, and having bookmark syncing and a
    really excellent tab interface is really cool.
    I like how the Apple fanbois dump on free software, yet when kickass
    proprietary software is excluded from their shiny iphone app store by
    anti competitive practice at Apple thats got a perfectly rational
    explanation (that they just made up) too.
    victor, Nov 27, 2009
    #17
  18. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <hen211$akc$-september.org>,
    > Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >
    >> victor wrote:
    >>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>> In message <>, Allistar
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In message <>, Allistar
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>>>>> Their browser doesn’t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>>>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade to
    >>>>>>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>>>>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>>>>>> exact same issue could happen with an open source browser.
    >>>>>> No it couldn’t.
    >>>>> Sure it could. An open source browser could be implemented such that
    >>>>> there
    >>>>> is no support for alternative compression servers.
    >>>> No-one would even try.
    >>>>
    >>>>> Once the open source community fixes this issue, customers in China
    >>>>> would
    >>>>> be forced to upgrade to the new version. Just like with a proprietary
    >>>>> browser.
    >>>> No-one would be “forced†to do anything—that’s the beauty of Free
    >>>> Software. I think you spend too much time with proprietary software,
    >>>> otherwise you wouldn’t think as you do.
    >>> And thats completely irrelevant.
    >>> Symbian is free software, the nokia browser is free software, they can
    >>> still be blocked.
    >>> The un upgraded International version of Opera still won't connect
    >>> because the Opera servers are blocked. The upgraded Chinese version
    >>> connects with the firewalled servers.
    >>> Its not an issue with proprietary code, changing the code would fix
    >>> nothing.

    >> Changing the code to use routes that aren't firewalled, however, remains
    >> an option.

    >
    > until they too are blocked


    At which point, what can you do, oh wait, change the code again for new
    routes. And so on to infinity.

    Are you another one that doesn't understand how malleable code is?
    Sailor Sam, Nov 27, 2009
    #18
  19. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <hen8lp$cjd$-september.org>,
    > victor <> wrote:


    >> It wouldn't make any difference in this case, I'm sure Opera will get
    >> accepted eventually, its available for MacOSX.
    >> The page loads are noticeably quicker, and having bookmark syncing and a
    >> really excellent tab interface is really cool.
    >> I like how the Apple fanbois dump on free software, yet when kickass
    >> proprietary software is excluded from their shiny iphone app store by
    >> anti competitive practice at Apple thats got a perfectly rational
    >> explanation (that they just made up) too.

    >
    > Opera is available for OSX because there is no rule about any
    > application being able to run arbitrary code, there always has been on
    > the iPhone (HTML being that arbitrary code).


    It looks like a bogus policy if the software they exclude runs on every
    other smart-phone.
    I expect they will sort it out as their product line matures, having a
    high percentage of their customers "jailbreaking" their phones to get
    extra functionality does look like they haven't got it quite right yet.
    victor, Nov 27, 2009
    #19
  20. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    whoisthis wrote:
    > In article <henf51$1dp$-september.org>,
    > Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >
    >> whoisthis wrote:
    >>> In article <hen211$akc$-september.org>,
    >>> Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> victor wrote:
    >>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>> In message <>, Allistar
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> In message <>, Allistar
    >>>>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> In message <hek505$k6r$-september.org>, victor wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> So its a service issue on mobile phone browsers, nothing to do with
    >>>>>>>>>>> proprietary vs free software at all.
    >>>>>>>>>> Their browser doesnâ¤t seem to support the use of alternative
    >>>>>>>>>> compression servers. And customers in China were forced to upgrade
    >>>>>>>>>> to
    >>>>>>>>>> the new version that used Chinese-based servers.
    >>>>>>>>> What has that got to do with proprietary vs. open source though? The
    >>>>>>>>> exact same issue could happen with an open source browser.
    >>>>>>>> No it couldnâ¤t.
    >>>>>>> Sure it could. An open source browser could be implemented such that
    >>>>>>> there
    >>>>>>> is no support for alternative compression servers.
    >>>>>> No-one would even try.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Once the open source community fixes this issue, customers in China
    >>>>>>> would
    >>>>>>> be forced to upgrade to the new version. Just like with a proprietary
    >>>>>>> browser.
    >>>>>> No-one would be ⤦forcedâ¤? to do anything⤲thatâ¤s the beauty of
    >>>>>> Free
    >>>>>> Software. I think you spend too much time with proprietary software,
    >>>>>> otherwise you wouldnâ¤t think as you do.
    >>>>> And thats completely irrelevant.
    >>>>> Symbian is free software, the nokia browser is free software, they can
    >>>>> still be blocked.
    >>>>> The un upgraded International version of Opera still won't connect
    >>>>> because the Opera servers are blocked. The upgraded Chinese version
    >>>>> connects with the firewalled servers.
    >>>>> Its not an issue with proprietary code, changing the code would fix
    >>>>> nothing.
    >>>> Changing the code to use routes that aren't firewalled, however, remains
    >>>> an option.
    >>> until they too are blocked

    >> At which point, what can you do, oh wait, change the code again for new
    >> routes. And so on to infinity.
    >>
    >> Are you another one that doesn't understand how malleable code is?

    >
    > Yeah, I write assembler.


    If that's true, why are you (and Allistar) so thick when it comes to code?
    Sailor Sam, Nov 27, 2009
    #20
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