Ever see these types in a camera store?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    They carry around a little pad of paper, furiously scribbling notes as
    a way of controlling the nagging self-doubt that accompanies every
    purchase they ever make, from a pack of gum to things like camera
    lenses. The sales people will often quip: "You writing a book?"
    Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse"), no matter how
    much due-diligence they've used prior to making the purchase and they
    go off on a quest to ask as many people as possible to validate their
    purchase, so they can have peace of mind. If someone should tell them
    that in their opinion, the purchase was ill-advised, this will often
    provoke a near-violent reaction on the part of the doubting buyer as
    one negative response needs at least 10 more positive ones to counter
    it. More than one negative response will likely result in the buyer
    returning the item, without any thought given to how the product
    actually works for them, personally.

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1041&message=33629171
     
    RichA, Dec 26, 2009
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Dave Cohen Guest

    On 12/26/2009 1:44 PM, RichA wrote:
    > They carry around a little pad of paper, furiously scribbling notes as
    > a way of controlling the nagging self-doubt that accompanies every
    > purchase they ever make, from a pack of gum to things like camera
    > lenses. The sales people will often quip: "You writing a book?"
    > Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    > known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse"), no matter how
    > much due-diligence they've used prior to making the purchase and they
    > go off on a quest to ask as many people as possible to validate their
    > purchase, so they can have peace of mind. If someone should tell them
    > that in their opinion, the purchase was ill-advised, this will often
    > provoke a near-violent reaction on the part of the doubting buyer as
    > one negative response needs at least 10 more positive ones to counter
    > it. More than one negative response will likely result in the buyer
    > returning the item, without any thought given to how the product
    > actually works for them, personally.
    >
    > http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1041&message=33629171
    >


    You are such a superior being, how on earth can you stand being
    surrounded by so many lesser beings. You must have great fortitude. We
    sympathize with you and hope to hell we never meet you in person, in
    which case we would be needing great fortitude.
     
    Dave Cohen, Dec 26, 2009
    #2
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  3. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Dec 26, 6:48 pm, Dave Cohen <> wrote:
    > On 12/26/2009 1:44 PM, RichA wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > They carry around a little pad of paper, furiously scribbling notes as
    > > a way of controlling the nagging self-doubt that accompanies every
    > > purchase they ever make, from a pack of gum to things like camera
    > > lenses.  The sales people will often quip:  "You writing a book?"
    > > Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    > > known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse"), no matter how
    > > much due-diligence they've used prior to making the purchase and they
    > > go off on a quest to ask as many people as possible to validate their
    > > purchase, so they can have peace of mind.  If someone should tell them
    > > that in their opinion, the purchase was ill-advised, this will often
    > > provoke a near-violent reaction on the part of the doubting buyer as
    > > one negative response needs at least 10 more positive ones to counter
    > > it.  More than one negative response will likely result in the buyer
    > > returning the item, without any thought given to how the product
    > > actually works for them, personally.

    >
    > >http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1041&message=33629171

    >
    > You are such a superior being, how on earth can you stand being
    > surrounded by so many lesser beings. You must have great fortitude. We
    > sympathize with you and hope to hell we never meet you in person, in
    > which case we would be needing great fortitude.


    Isn't it time you returned whatever it is you just bought from B&H?
     
    RichA, Dec 27, 2009
    #3
  4. RichA

    Twibil Guest

    On Dec 26, 11:44 am, RichA <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    > known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse")... (Snip)


    These is not now, nor has there ever been, anything called "buyer's
    remorse" in the "psychiatrist lexicon". (For that matter, there's no
    "psychiatrist lexicon", either.)

    But it's easy to understand why you might have had a passing
    aquaintance with a Psychiatrist.

    Or several.
     
    Twibil, Dec 27, 2009
    #4
  5. RichA

    Bristolian Guest

    RichA wrote:
    > They carry around a little pad of paper, furiously scribbling notes as
    > a way of controlling the nagging self-doubt that accompanies every
    > purchase they ever make, from a pack of gum to things like camera
    > lenses. The sales people will often quip: "You writing a book?"
    > Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    > known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse"), no matter how
    > much due-diligence they've used prior to making the purchase and they
    > go off on a quest to ask as many people as possible to validate their
    > purchase, so they can have peace of mind. If someone should tell them
    > that in their opinion, the purchase was ill-advised, this will often
    > provoke a near-violent reaction on the part of the doubting buyer as
    > one negative response needs at least 10 more positive ones to counter
    > it. More than one negative response will likely result in the buyer
    > returning the item, without any thought given to how the product
    > actually works for them, personally.
    >
    > http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1041&message=33629171
    >


    I understand this feeling only too well, except in my case) the remorse
    doesn't set in until the wife - SWMBO - gets to know about the purchase :)

    --
    Regards


    Bristolian
     
    Bristolian, Dec 27, 2009
    #5
  6. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 11:24:13 -0500, Bowser <> wrote:
    : On Sat, 26 Dec 2009 19:00:48 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    : wrote:
    :
    : >On Dec 26, 6:48 pm, Dave Cohen <> wrote:
    : >> On 12/26/2009 1:44 PM, RichA wrote:
    : >>
    : >>
    : >>
    : >> > They carry around a little pad of paper, furiously scribbling notes as
    : >> > a way of controlling the nagging self-doubt that accompanies every
    : >> > purchase they ever make, from a pack of gum to things like camera
    : >> > lenses.  The sales people will often quip:  "You writing a book?"
    : >> > Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    : >> > known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse"), no matter how
    : >> > much due-diligence they've used prior to making the purchase and they
    : >> > go off on a quest to ask as many people as possible to validate their
    : >> > purchase, so they can have peace of mind.  If someone should tell them
    : >> > that in their opinion, the purchase was ill-advised, this will often
    : >> > provoke a near-violent reaction on the part of the doubting buyer as
    : >> > one negative response needs at least 10 more positive ones to counter
    : >> > it.  More than one negative response will likely result in the buyer
    : >> > returning the item, without any thought given to how the product
    : >> > actually works for them, personally.
    : >>
    : >> >http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1041&message=33629171
    : >>
    : >> You are such a superior being, how on earth can you stand being
    : >> surrounded by so many lesser beings. You must have great fortitude. We
    : >> sympathize with you and hope to hell we never meet you in person, in
    : >> which case we would be needing great fortitude.
    : >
    : >Isn't it time you returned whatever it is you just bought from B&H?
    :
    : Too late. I kept it for more than 15 days and I had to deal with Canon
    : USA service and support. Big mistake.

    I'm surprised if Canon Service gave you a hard time. I had dealings once with
    the Jamesburg shop, and they were helpful and professional. And they didn't
    charge me for a repair that they could plausibly have claimed was my fault.
    (It was a firmware upgrade, and I became confused by the on-screen helps and
    therefore failed to follow the more-specific printed instructions.) I needed
    the camera back in a hurry for an event in Philadelphia, and they arranged to
    get it done quickly so I could pick it up on the way.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 28, 2009
    #6
  7. RichA

    Chrlz Guest

    On Dec 27, 5:44 am, RichA <> wrote:
    > They carry around a little pad of paper, furiously scribbling notes as
    > a way of controlling the nagging self-doubt that accompanies every
    > purchase they ever make, from a pack of gum to things like camera
    > lenses.  The sales people will often quip:  "You writing a book?"
    > Once they've purchased the product, massive doubt sets in (formerly
    > known in the psychiatrist lexicon as "buyer's remorse"), no matter how
    > much due-diligence they've used prior to making the purchase and they
    > go off on a quest to ask as many people as possible to validate their
    > purchase, so they can have peace of mind.  If someone should tell them
    > that in their opinion, the purchase was ill-advised, this will often
    > provoke a near-violent reaction on the part of the doubting buyer as
    > one negative response needs at least 10 more positive ones to counter
    > it.  More than one negative response will likely result in the buyer
    > returning the item, without any thought given to how the product
    > actually works for them, personally.
    >
    > http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1041&message=33629171


    Rich, why haven't you returned to the thread where you claimed you had
    tested thermal properties of plastic v. metal and shown how inferior
    plastic cameras were? ("For the LAST TIME..")

    What annoys ME is people who run when their claims are challenged.
     
    Chrlz, Dec 28, 2009
    #7
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