Ethernet card support?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIGluIEN1cGVydGlubw==?=, May 22, 2005.

  1. I was rather surprised to find that the XP 64 trial didn't install, or
    seemingly include, appropriate drivers for a ratty old Kingston ethernet
    card. On Win2K, I was just using the built-in support - "Intel 21143 Based
    PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter". I would think vanilla ethernet support would
    come with the trial. My 64 bit motherboard has onboard ethernet, but there
    are some issues with using it, and I only need it for a DSL connection, so
    the plain vanilla PCI board is actually more convenient at this point.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIGluIEN1cGVydGlubw==?=, May 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. Bob in Cupertino wrote:
    > I was rather surprised to find that the XP 64 trial didn't install, or
    > seemingly include, appropriate drivers for a ratty old Kingston ethernet
    > card.




    Why are you surprised? It's not as if Microsoft develops and/or
    produces drivers for other manufacturers' hardware devices. If Kingston
    didn't choose provide 64-bit drivers for their "ratty *OLD*" (your words
    - emphasis mine, and probably the real answer to your question) Ethernet
    card to Microsoft for testing and inclusion in the new OS, it's hardly
    Microsoft's fault.



    > On Win2K, I was just using the built-in support - "Intel 21143 Based
    > PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter".



    That's a 5-year-old (2 to 2½ *generations*, in computer terms) OS. If
    your NIC is that old, I actually be surprised to find it to have drivers
    for a modern OS.


    > I would think vanilla ethernet support would
    > come with the trial.



    There's no such thing as a "plain vanilla" Ethernet card. Each
    individual manufacturer produces its own device drivers. If those
    manufacturers want their drivers distributed by Microsoft, as part of an
    OS, they have to submit the drivers for testing, well in advance of the
    OS' release to the public. They've had many months of pre-release time
    in which to have done so. Does either Kingston or Intel (makers of the
    chipset, not necessarily the drivers) even support that particular NIC
    anymore?


    > My 64 bit motherboard has onboard ethernet, but there
    > are some issues with using it, and I only need it for a DSL connection, so
    > the plain vanilla PCI board is actually more convenient at this point.



    The solution seems clear, to me. Either fix the "issues" with your
    integrated NIC, which I'll wager is supported by drivers provided with
    the OS, or purchase a newer NIC that is WinXPx64-compatible.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
     
    Bruce Chambers, May 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIGluIEN1cGVydGlubw==?=

    M. Murcek Guest

    Ironically, the mobo ethernet may be the way to go, unless it is also of an
    older vintage.

    "Bruce Chambers" <0m> wrote in message
    news:%23vyzR$...
    > Bob in Cupertino wrote:
    >> I was rather surprised to find that the XP 64 trial didn't install, or
    >> seemingly include, appropriate drivers for a ratty old Kingston ethernet
    >> card.

    >
    >
    >
    > Why are you surprised? It's not as if Microsoft develops and/or produces
    > drivers for other manufacturers' hardware devices. If Kingston didn't
    > choose provide 64-bit drivers for their "ratty *OLD*" (your words -
    > emphasis mine, and probably the real answer to your question) Ethernet
    > card to Microsoft for testing and inclusion in the new OS, it's hardly
    > Microsoft's fault.
    >
    >
    >
    >> On Win2K, I was just using the built-in support - "Intel 21143 Based PCI
    >> Fast Ethernet Adapter".

    >
    >
    > That's a 5-year-old (2 to 2½ *generations*, in computer terms) OS. If
    > your NIC is that old, I actually be surprised to find it to have drivers
    > for a modern OS.
    >
    >
    >> I would think vanilla ethernet support would come with the trial.

    >
    >
    > There's no such thing as a "plain vanilla" Ethernet card. Each individual
    > manufacturer produces its own device drivers. If those manufacturers want
    > their drivers distributed by Microsoft, as part of an OS, they have to
    > submit the drivers for testing, well in advance of the OS' release to the
    > public. They've had many months of pre-release time in which to have done
    > so. Does either Kingston or Intel (makers of the chipset, not necessarily
    > the drivers) even support that particular NIC anymore?
    >
    >
    >> My 64 bit motherboard has onboard ethernet, but there are some issues
    >> with using it, and I only need it for a DSL connection, so
    >> the plain vanilla PCI board is actually more convenient at this point.

    >
    >
    > The solution seems clear, to me. Either fix the "issues" with your
    > integrated NIC, which I'll wager is supported by drivers provided with the
    > OS, or purchase a newer NIC that is WinXPx64-compatible.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Bruce Chambers
    >
    > Help us help you:
    > http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    >
    > You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    > both at once. - RAH
     
    M. Murcek, May 22, 2005
    #3
  4. M. Murcek wrote:
    > Ironically, the mobo ethernet may be the way to go, unless it is also of an
    > older vintage.
    >



    I don't see how that could be the case, if it's a 64-bit motherboard,
    as the OP said it was.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
     
    Bruce Chambers, May 22, 2005
    #4
  5. Thanks for the input, and reminding me that I'm using a fossilized ethernet
    card and OS. Nevertheless, I wouldn't be surprised if it will work in the
    released edition.

    Yeah, I suppose I could work out what ails the onboard ethernet, which is
    undoubtedly a configuration issue. NVidia's drivers seem fine, both the 32
    bit versions on Win2K and 64 on XP 64 bit edition. I can surf the web OK, I
    just can't get it to let requests in to a web server, which sounds like the
    onboard firewall is blocking them - it is supposedly turned off, as is the XP
    firewall, and this happens trying to use the onboard ethernet under Win2K,
    too, which doesn't provide a firewall (I have a router, and I've run
    zonealarm for ages, which refuses to install on 64 bit edition, BTW. I don't
    need any more firewalls out of anybody).

    Rather than sorting through what's going on, it would simply be more
    convenient to continue using the NIC. This is an issue I can work around,
    though - I suspect I won't be going to 64 bit until I can get ODBC
    connectivity to access databases as per my other question.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIGluIEN1cGVydGlubw==?=, May 22, 2005
    #5
  6. "Bob in Cupertino" <> wrote
    in:

    > I was rather surprised to find that the XP 64 trial didn't
    > install, or seemingly include, appropriate drivers for a ratty old
    > Kingston ethernet card. On Win2K, I was just using the built-in
    > support - "Intel 21143 Based PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter". I would
    > think vanilla ethernet support would come with the trial. My 64
    > bit motherboard has onboard ethernet, but there are some issues
    > with using it, and I only need it for a DSL connection, so the
    > plain vanilla PCI board is actually more convenient at this point.


    I'd use the onboard ethernet, X64 includes support for the onboard
    ethernet used on most AMD Athlon64 Motherboards.

    --
    David R. Norton MVP
    <>
     
    David R. Norton MVP, May 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Ah, the nVidia firewall problem. We've seen that reported here before, and
    for at least one person, the fix was to install the firewall, and then
    UN-install the firewall. Please try that and see if it resolves the issue.

    In looking for inexpensive, but supported, ethernet cards, I ran across a
    Micronet SP2612R (RealTek, RTL8169/8110 based) Gigabit NIC for $9.95 CAD.
    Plugged it in, and it worked like a charm, without having to even go find
    drivers. At that price, I wish I'd bought several, since they're back up to
    about $30 CAD at NCIX now.

    --
    Charlie.

    Bob in Cupertino wrote:
    > Thanks for the input, and reminding me that I'm using a fossilized
    > ethernet card and OS. Nevertheless, I wouldn't be surprised if it
    > will work in the released edition.
    >
    > Yeah, I suppose I could work out what ails the onboard ethernet,
    > which is undoubtedly a configuration issue. NVidia's drivers seem
    > fine, both the 32 bit versions on Win2K and 64 on XP 64 bit edition.
    > I can surf the web OK, I just can't get it to let requests in to a
    > web server, which sounds like the onboard firewall is blocking them -
    > it is supposedly turned off, as is the XP firewall, and this happens
    > trying to use the onboard ethernet under Win2K, too, which doesn't
    > provide a firewall (I have a router, and I've run zonealarm for ages,
    > which refuses to install on 64 bit edition, BTW. I don't need any
    > more firewalls out of anybody).
    >
    > Rather than sorting through what's going on, it would simply be more
    > convenient to continue using the NIC. This is an issue I can work
    > around, though - I suspect I won't be going to 64 bit until I can get
    > ODBC connectivity to access databases as per my other question.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, May 22, 2005
    #7
  8. "Bob in Cupertino" <> wrote in
    message news:...

    > Rather than sorting through what's going on, it would simply be more
    > convenient to continue using the NIC. This is an issue I can work around,
    > though - I suspect I won't be going to 64 bit until I can get ODBC
    > connectivity to access databases as per my other question.


    Jeesh.... an NIC card costs what? 20 bucks? And you'd rather go with an
    old out of date card why? Surely your budget would allow a $20 dollar
    purchase?
     
    Morituri-|-Max, May 22, 2005
    #8
  9. =?Utf-8?B?Qm9iIGluIEN1cGVydGlubw==?=

    Guest

    On Sun, 22 May 2005 11:21:17 -0700, "Charlie Russel - MVP"
    <> wrote:

    >Ah, the nVidia firewall problem. We've seen that reported here before, and
    >for at least one person, the fix was to install the firewall, and then
    >UN-install the firewall. Please try that and see if it resolves the issue.


    Had same issue here. Had to install the NV firewall uninstall it and
    then install it again to be able to even access the web.
    It looks like NV NIC drivers installs some parts of firewall even
    when you tell it not to.
    >
    >In looking for inexpensive, but supported, ethernet cards, I ran across a
    >Micronet SP2612R (RealTek, RTL8169/8110 based) Gigabit NIC for $9.95 CAD.
    >Plugged it in, and it worked like a charm, without having to even go find
    >drivers. At that price, I wish I'd bought several, since they're back up to
    >about $30 CAD at NCIX now.
     
    , May 23, 2005
    #9
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