Ethernet and non Ethernet leads

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by IKVadeus@gmail.com, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. Guest

    When pertaining to IP telephony, what are Ethernet and non Ethernet
    leads? Is that simply that, the pairs used to transmit data are
    referred to Ethernet leads and the pairs that aren't are then referred
    to as non Ethernet leads?

    -IKV
    , Apr 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. Guest

    I know nothing about this but I did some research.

    Are leads the connectors themselves?

    I read an article mentioning the use of ethernet leads as opposed to
    regular modem leads. It sounded like he meant the connectors which
    would mean RJ-45 as opposed to RJ-11.

    So maybe used in this context he means Ethernet leads(which are RJ-45)
    and non Ethernet leads(which could be anything besides RJ-45).

    Isn't the Ethernet physical standard defined by using RJ-45
    connectors? If so this makes sense.

    -Ciscopimpenator
    , Apr 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. flamer Guest

    On Apr 1, 5:49 pm, wrote:
    > When pertaining to IP telephony, what are Ethernet and non Ethernet
    > leads? Is that simply that, the pairs used to transmit data are
    > referred to Ethernet leads and the pairs that aren't are then referred
    > to as non Ethernet leads?
    >
    > -IKV


    ethernet = cat5/5e/6 etc..
    non ethernet = twisted pair voice cable

    Flamer.
    flamer , Apr 2, 2007
    #3
  4. wrote:
    > Isn't the Ethernet physical standard defined by using RJ-45
    > connectors?


    Which Ethernet standard? 10Base5 and 10BASE2 certainly don't use "RJ45"
    connectors. Nor do things like 10GBASE-SR

    AFAIK RJ45 is an ordering code for an AT&T telephony service. The
    computer industry misappropriated the name and applied it to 8P8C
    modular connectors.

    As for defining a standard by using a plug, when I plug a serial lead
    with a RJ45 plug into the console port of my Cisco router it certainly
    does not feel like I'm writing a document containing a definition of a
    communications technology. :)

    Wait a moment, let me check the date in your message header ...
    RedGrittyBrick, Apr 2, 2007
    #4
  5. wrote:
    > When pertaining to IP telephony, what are Ethernet and non Ethernet
    > leads?


    Ethernet leads are leads designed to be used with Ethernet. Non Ethernet
    leads are leads intended for some other purpose.

    "IP telephony" refers to the carriage of voice communications using
    Internet Protocol. IP specifies no particular physical medium.

    > Is that simply that, the pairs used to transmit data are
    > referred to Ethernet leads and the pairs that aren't are then referred
    > to as non Ethernet leads?
    >


    No.

    Pairs are not leads. You shouldn't refer to a pair as a lead. A lead is
    a piece of cable terminated by connectors. Some types of cable contain
    pairs of conductors.

    Pairs used to *receive* Ethernet data are not "non Ethernet".

    1000BASE-T (Gigabit Ethernet over copper cabling) uses four pairs of
    Category 5e cables. That doesn't leave any pairs free for other "non
    Ethernet" purposes.
    RedGrittyBrick, Apr 2, 2007
    #5
  6. In article <4610e529$0$6955$>,
    RedGrittyBrick <> wrote:
    >AFAIK RJ45 is an ordering code for an AT&T telephony service. The
    >computer industry misappropriated the name and applied it to 8P8C
    >modular connectors.


    http://www.hvs.on.ca/modular_jack_wiring.htm

    Universal Service Ordering Codes (USOC) are a series of
    Registered Jack (RJ) wiring configurations developed by the Bell
    System for connection of customer premise equipment to the public
    network. FCC regulations control the application of these
    configurations when used for this purpose.

    In other words, RJ45 really is the jack and wiring configuration
    combination, and not a particular telephony service.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rj45

    Furthermore, true telephone RJ45 involves a "keyed" variety of
    the 8P body, which means it may have an extra tab that a computer
    "RJ45" connector is unable to mate with.

    So yes, there was a name misappropriatation; I'm just quibbling
    about what it was that originally held the name that was
    misappropriated.
    Walter Roberson, Apr 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Guest

    Who cares about 10Base5 or 10Base 2...are we living in the stone
    age? :) BNC connectors rock!

    Most modern Ethernet uses RJ-45 or 8P8C like the telecom guy says.

    I'm going to build my home lab with 10Base2 or better yet Token Ring!
    Then I will route traffic using the IPX protocol suite and then I will
    put modem between me and my Cisco 2502 so I can configure the router
    faster.

    Yeah I'm cool!
    , Apr 11, 2007
    #7
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