Epson 2200 , Inks and cold

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mark B, Nov 18, 2006.

  1. Mark B

    Mark B Guest

    Well its that time again. I have an Epson 2200 that I will have to
    move. It may have to be in the truck overnight in cold conditions,
    potentially freezing. Though that can't be good anyone know how it
    would effect the inks or the printer should they freeze? Any luck on
    the freezing point of ink being lower than that of water?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Mark
     
    Mark B, Nov 18, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <UXK7h.839$a_2.200@trnddc01>,
    Mark B <> wrote:

    > Well its that time again. I have an Epson 2200 that I will have to
    > move. It may have to be in the truck overnight in cold conditions,
    > potentially freezing. Though that can't be good anyone know how it
    > would effect the inks or the printer should they freeze? Any luck on
    > the freezing point of ink being lower than that of water?
    >
    > Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    >
    > Mark


    Although I don't know the limitations on the inks and cold, perhaps you
    could run a power cord out to the truck with a small portable space
    heater (keeping in mind safety issues) next the printer. I have a 100 ft
    extension cord if you need to borrow. :^)


    --
    Would thou choose to meet a rat eating dragon, or
    a dragon, eating rat? The answer of: I am somewhere
    in the middle. "Me who is part taoist and part Christian".
     
    Little Green Eyed Dragon, Nov 18, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. In article <UXK7h.839$a_2.200@trnddc01>, says...
    > Well its that time again. I have an Epson 2200 that I will have to
    > move. It may have to be in the truck overnight in cold conditions,
    > potentially freezing. Though that can't be good anyone know how it
    > would effect the inks or the printer should they freeze? Any luck on
    > the freezing point of ink being lower than that of water?
    >
    > Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    >
    > Mark
    >

    Dealers ship Epson inks all over the world in all types of
    weather. A shipment via UPS in the winter might stay on a truck
    for several days. I think the inks must be made to handle this
    situation. You might want to remove the cartridges from the
    printer and put them in a less exposed package just to be safe.

    --
    Robert D Feinman
    Landscapes, Cityscapes and Panoramic Photographs
    http://robertdfeinman.com
    mail:
     
    Robert Feinman, Nov 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Mark B <> wrote:
    >Well its that time again. I have an Epson 2200 that I will have
    >to move. It may have to be in the truck overnight in cold
    >conditions, potentially freezing. Though that can't be good
    >anyone know how it would effect the inks or the printer should
    >they freeze? Any luck on the freezing point of ink being lower
    >than that of water?
    >
    >Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    >
    >Mark


    I wouldn't worry about it at all. I've seen inks exposed to at
    least -40, so what you might experience is not much of a
    problem.

    The liquid part of ink is what we can call a "solvent", which is
    necessarily something that will "dry" (vaporize) quickly in air.
    I don't know what they actually use, but almost certainly one of
    the more obvious characteristics of such liquids is that they
    don't freeze at anything near the temperature that water does.
    Think in terms of alcohols...

    But beyond that, the ink has all sorts of things dissolved in it.
    Whether it is dye or pigment based, it is full of "stuff". And
    that too will almost certainly lower the freezing point.

    But beyond that, what harm would be done if it did actually
    freeze solid? Probably none! There is necessarily
    pressurization room in the cartridge, so there is room for
    expansion as it freezes (assuming that whatever it is works like
    water and expands, which may not be the case anyway).

    All that said, there actually is a problem. If the printer gets
    as cold as the "dew point", you want it wrapped up nicely in a
    plastic bag before you bring it into a nice warm (i.e., moist)
    house. Otherwise when it comes inside the warm air will condense
    moisture on the printer, and it will look like it had been out in
    the rain. Freezing won't hurt it, but water will.

    The plastic bag doesn't have to be air tight as such, but you
    want it tight enough that no significant air moves in and out of
    the bag until it gets warmed up. A regular 33 gallon trash bag
    would work well for an Epson 2200. I'm not sure if it would
    quite fit into a "tall kitchen" bag or not, but you can try.
    Two of them, one on each end with a lot of overlap, would work
    well too.

    Remember the plastic bag it was original shipped in? That is
    what you want to duplicate.

    Keep it in the bag, on a warm shelf, over night or at least long
    enough for all parts to warm up to well above freezing. Don't
    try to use it until the entire printer is at room temperature.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Nov 20, 2006
    #4
  5. "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mark B <> wrote:
    >>Well its that time again. I have an Epson 2200 that I will have
    >>to move. It may have to be in the truck overnight in cold
    >>conditions, potentially freezing. Though that can't be good
    >>anyone know how it would effect the inks or the printer should
    >>they freeze? Any luck on the freezing point of ink being lower
    >>than that of water?
    >>
    >>Any suggestions would be appreciated.
    >>
    >>Mark

    >
    > I wouldn't worry about it at all. I've seen inks exposed to at
    > least -40, so what you might experience is not much of a
    > problem.
    >
    > The liquid part of ink is what we can call a "solvent", which is
    > necessarily something that will "dry" (vaporize) quickly in air.
    > I don't know what they actually use, but almost certainly one of
    > the more obvious characteristics of such liquids is that they
    > don't freeze at anything near the temperature that water does.
    > Think in terms of alcohols...
    >
    > But beyond that, the ink has all sorts of things dissolved in it.
    > Whether it is dye or pigment based, it is full of "stuff". And
    > that too will almost certainly lower the freezing point.
    >
    > But beyond that, what harm would be done if it did actually
    > freeze solid? Probably none! There is necessarily
    > pressurization room in the cartridge, so there is room for
    > expansion as it freezes (assuming that whatever it is works like
    > water and expands, which may not be the case anyway).
    >
    > All that said, there actually is a problem. If the printer gets
    > as cold as the "dew point", you want it wrapped up nicely in a
    > plastic bag before you bring it into a nice warm (i.e., moist)
    > house. Otherwise when it comes inside the warm air will condense
    > moisture on the printer, and it will look like it had been out in
    > the rain. Freezing won't hurt it, but water will.
    >
    > The plastic bag doesn't have to be air tight as such, but you
    > want it tight enough that no significant air moves in and out of
    > the bag until it gets warmed up. A regular 33 gallon trash bag
    > would work well for an Epson 2200. I'm not sure if it would
    > quite fit into a "tall kitchen" bag or not, but you can try.
    > Two of them, one on each end with a lot of overlap, would work
    > well too.
    >
    > Remember the plastic bag it was original shipped in? That is
    > what you want to duplicate.
    >
    > Keep it in the bag, on a warm shelf, over night or at least long
    > enough for all parts to warm up to well above freezing. Don't
    > try to use it until the entire printer is at room temperature.
    >
    > --
    > Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    > Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)


    From
    http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/...infoType=Specs&oid=20306147&category=Products
    (Epson's specification page for the 2200), it is rated for storage to -4F
    (-20C).
    Kerry
     
    KERRY MONTGOMERY, Nov 20, 2006
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. nobody nowhere

    Re: Epson printer 2200 - Epson semi-gloss paper

    nobody nowhere, Jul 13, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    824
    Bill Hilton
    Jul 13, 2003
  2. Grady R. Thompson

    Epson 2200 vs. Epson 4000

    Grady R. Thompson, Dec 3, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    980
    Rafe B.
    Dec 5, 2003
  3. Frank Gingrich

    Epson printers and inks

    Frank Gingrich, Jan 25, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    383
    Mark Herring
    Feb 1, 2004
  4. Ken
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    576
  5. JC  Dill
    Replies:
    72
    Views:
    1,302
    Hecate
    Apr 7, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page