EOS 20D vs. EOS Rebel XT?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ivan, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. Ivan

    Ivan Guest

    I'm can't decide which one...
    Any advice is appriciated.
    tnx
    ivan
     
    Ivan, Aug 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Ivan

    carrigman Guest

    If money is not a problem go for the 20D. It is by far the superior camera
    in terms of ergonomics and build quality.

    Carrigman


    "Ivan" <> wrote in message news:de3vl9$b76$-com.hr...
    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.
    > tnx
    > ivan
    >
     
    carrigman, Aug 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ivan

    Brian Baird Guest

    In article <de3vl9$b76$-com.hr>, says...
    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.
    > tnx
    > ivan


    When in doubt: spend more money. That way you can go:

    "I'm glad I spent the extra money, it was worth it!"
    --
    http://www.pbase.com/bcbaird
     
    Brian Baird, Aug 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Ivan

    Craig Dunn Guest

    I had the same debate... Ended up with the 20D not only because of the
    durability but the controls are far easier to operate - the wheel on
    the back and top makes it easy to adjust aperture, shutter speed...etc
    whilst framing your shot, on the 350D alot is done by pushing buttons,
    which I find very irritating.
     
    Craig Dunn, Aug 19, 2005
    #4
  5. "Ivan" <> wrote in message news:de3vl9$b76$-com.hr...
    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.
    > tnx
    > ivan


    Rather spend more money on lenses than on camera body.
    For money given for 20D with poor kit lens you can get 350D with very good
    lens.

    Radije potrosi vise novaca na objektive nego na samo tjelo aparata.
    Za novce za koje ces dobiti 20D sa sugavim kit objektivom mozes dobiti 350D
    sa jako dobrom lecom.

    EOS 350D is not bad camera at all.
    I own one :)
     
    °..Jan Plexy..°, Aug 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Ivan

    SimonLW Guest

    "Ivan" <> wrote in message news:de3vl9$b76$-com.hr...
    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.
    > tnx
    > ivan
    >
    >

    Depends on what you need. I use Av mode almost exclusively. I don't need
    much of the rest and I prefer the smaller size of the Rebel. If spending the
    budget on the camera is going to prevent you from getting the lenses you
    want, I'd go for the lower cost camera.
    -S
     
    SimonLW, Aug 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Ivan

    SimonLW Guest

    "Ivan" <> wrote in message news:de3vl9$b76$-com.hr...
    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.
    > tnx
    > ivan
    >
    >

    Depends on what you need. I use Av mode almost exclusively. I don't need
    much of the rest and I prefer the smaller size of the Rebel. If spending the
    budget on the camera is going to prevent you from getting the lenses you
    want, I'd go for the lower cost camera.
    -S
     
    SimonLW, Aug 19, 2005
    #7
  8. Ivan

    r Guest

    I have had my Canon 20D for two weeks now and find it to be an incredible
    camera

    Rod
    "Brian Baird" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <de3vl9$b76$-com.hr>, says...
    >> I'm can't decide which one...
    >> Any advice is appriciated.
    >> tnx
    >> ivan

    >
    > When in doubt: spend more money. That way you can go:
    >
    > "I'm glad I spent the extra money, it was worth it!"
    > --
    > http://www.pbase.com/bcbaird
     
    r, Aug 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Ivan

    Brian Guest

    I just bought an XT...I figured I would probably upgrade the body in a
    few years and I wanted to get a better lens. So for less than the 20D
    body I got the XT and a great lens! Originally I thought the body
    might be too small but it was ok - if you have huge hands though it
    might be a little tight. Image quality is effectively equal and the
    20D didn't have any additional features that I thought I would use
    regularly.
     
    Brian, Aug 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Ivan

    wilt Guest

    Buy to fit YOUR NEED, not based on 'status'. Some people 'need' a
    really fast new PC, others do just fine with a 5 year old PC.
    Different stroke for different folks.
    Buy to fit your HANDS & BRAIN...you have to use the thing, so you need
    what feels good in your hands and has the controls where your brain
    finds them most suitable. Different stroke for different folks.

    The 350XT and the 20D are both fine cameras. Do you need a Toyota or a
    Lexus? Same thing.
     
    wilt, Aug 19, 2005
    #10
  11. Ivan

    Eatmorepies Guest

    "Ivan" <> wrote in message news:de3vl9$b76$-com.hr...
    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.
    > tnx
    > ivan


    If you need the 20D get it. Otherwise, buy the cheaper camera and wait for
    technology to make the next giant step.

    I bought the 350D (XT) because I know that in a couple of years I will buy a
    full frame body - when prices have fallen. I have spent my money on 3 L
    lenses and the results are way beyond anything I could get with the Canon
    lenses I had bought for my original film SLR. Spend your money on lenses.

    John
     
    Eatmorepies, Aug 19, 2005
    #11
  12. Ivan

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <de3vl9$b76$-com.hr>, "Ivan" <> wrote:

    > I'm can't decide which one...
    > Any advice is appriciated.


    Not without knowing what your needs are. Try both cameras at a store
    where they are sold and see which model feels good in your hands. They
    are totally different in how they handle. Only you will know which
    camera fits your hands best and offers the most appropriate set of
    features for the type of photographs you want to shoot.

    For me, the choice is obvious, the 20D. That's because the Rebel XT
    simply does not fit right in my hands. The Rebel XT feels like a child's
    camera to me, and my hands are only of average size. On the other hand,
    I have a good friend who has the Rebel XT and she loves it. YMMV.
     
    Shawn Hirn, Aug 20, 2005
    #12
  13. Ivan

    Frank ess Guest

    Shawn Hirn wrote:
    > In article <de3vl9$b76$-com.hr>, "Ivan" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm can't decide which one...
    >> Any advice is appriciated.

    >
    > Not without knowing what your needs are. Try both cameras at a store
    > where they are sold and see which model feels good in your hands.
    > They
    > are totally different in how they handle. Only you will know which
    > camera fits your hands best and offers the most appropriate set of
    > features for the type of photographs you want to shoot.
    >
    > For me, the choice is obvious, the 20D. That's because the Rebel XT
    > simply does not fit right in my hands. The Rebel XT feels like a
    > child's camera to me, and my hands are only of average size. On the
    > other hand, I have a good friend who has the Rebel XT and she loves
    > it. YMMV.


    From my point of view most of what has been said is correct, with
    regard to the physical properties and capabilities of the two cameras;
    however, there is another very important aspect: the elimination of
    "buyer's remorse".

    If you buy the less expensive camera and find it fulfills your needs,
    very fine. If you eventually learn, or even suspect, that it is
    missing something the more expensive one offers, you'll always carry
    the sour little kernel of resentment: "How could I be so stupid!?"

    If you go for the higher-cost one, you know from the git-go that you
    couldn't have done better, body-wise. Of course there is the niggling
    little itch that says, "With that extra bunch of dollars, I could have
    had an 'L' lens. How could I be so ... "

    My experience: I bought the 20D, really, really like it, feel no
    buyer's remorse. (The extra money wasn't a factor, since I found
    enough for the body and some good lenses) Then, I believed I needed a
    second body, back-up. I got the RebXT/350D. It works great, makes
    photos indistinguisable from the 20D under similar circumstances.

    BUT, the less-expensive one is a little bit more difficult to tame:
    some choices that are simple push-turns on the 20D are push-push-push
    and/or menu choices on the RebXT. Bright as they are, I still have
    trouble seeing anything on the monitors, in bright sunlight.

    Any road, I joked that my RebXT flashes, error code "Dummy! Dummy!
    Dummy!" when the battery gets low.

    "Dummy! Dummy! Dummy!" "Save for two more months and could have had
    another 20D".

    "Dummy! Dummy! Dummy!" "Save for two more months and could have had
    another 20D".

    "Dummy! Dummy! Dummy!" "Save for two more months and could have had
    another 20D".


    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Aug 20, 2005
    #13
  14. Ivan

    Go-dot Guest

    On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 08:53:36 +0200, "Ivan" <> wrote:

    >I'm can't decide which one...
    >Any advice is appriciated.
    >tnx
    >ivan
    >


    Ivan,
    I just spent the weekend shooting candid pictures at my niece's
    wedding and preparations with both cameras. I earned my living in the
    70's and early 80's as a professional photographer (before getting
    into information systems) so I have a pretty good idea as to what I'm
    doing.

    The 350D is mine, and I usually shoot with the battery grip installed,
    with a hand strap. The 20D is my brother's, but I spent the day before
    practicing with it. One should never shoot an important subject with
    an unfamiliar camera.

    Lenses used were the Canon 17-85 IS lens, and the Tokina 12-24 lens.

    My observations:

    The 20D has a larger screen view than the 350d, which is nice. On the
    other hand, the 350D has much better eye relief. The 20D requires that
    I mash my face up to the camera to see the whole image area. Placing
    the EP-15 (?) eyepiece extender on the 20D resolves the eye relief
    issue, but then the image becomes smaller than the 350D.

    The 20D has a much bigger buffer than the 350D, though in shooting a
    wedding, this did not come into play. Shooting motorsports or action
    sports, this is a nice feature, though.

    Size: The 20D is significantly larger than the 350D, though not large
    enough to provide a grip for my smallest finger. With the battery
    grip on the 350D (and 6 AA's) I had a much better grip and better
    balance as well. A battery grip is also available for the 20D (though
    it doesn't use AA's). With the grip, the 350 is bigger than the 20D
    without a grip.

    Ergonomics: To my surprise, although I would like the 20D (it's
    similar to my Elan), I greatly preferred the control ergonomics of the
    350D. The big advantage, in my opinion, is the dedicated buttons on
    the 350D for ISO, Autofocus mode, White balance, and Metering mode. I
    was shooting in mixed lighting conditions of greatly varying
    intensity, some intensely backlit scenes, subjects with large amounts
    of bright white and dark black (i.e. bride and groom), dim light,
    moving subjects in twilight (the rehearsal) etc. The 350D's dedicated
    buttons were much faster and easier to use than the 20D's menu and
    rear scroll wheel system. On the other hand, if you're not in a
    hurry, the 20D's menu scroll wheel is easier to use than the 350D's
    menu scroll buttons.

    Towards the end of the reception, yes I had consumed several drinks,
    which took the edge off my skills. In that case, the ergonomics of the
    350D were much appreciated.

    Someone else mentioned that "with the 20D...the wheel on the back and
    top makes it easy to adjust aperture, shutter speed...etc
    whilst framing your shot, on the 350D alot is done by pushing
    buttons". I doubt that this person has ever used a 350D. If they
    did, they would have known that these functions are controlled on the
    350D by the front scroll wheel, just like they are on the 20D, and in
    fact every EOS I have ever used, going back to the proto-EOS, the T90.

    In actual shooting conditions, I found the two cameras so similar is
    use that switching between them was no hassle at all.

    To sum it up, I prefer the 350D due to the ease of quickly changing
    ISO, Metering, Autofocus, and white balance. A second major advantage
    (with the battery grip) is the ability to use AA batteries. I use
    2500 ma/hr Evereadys, but I also keep a set of long life alkalines in
    the kit as a peace of mind insurance.
     
    Go-dot, Aug 23, 2005
    #14
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