Entering the IT field w/A+... possible?

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by 66boy, Sep 9, 2003.

  1. 66boy

    66boy Guest

    Hi all...

    I have a question that probably was asked many times before, but as
    you know, each individual is different, and each situation is unique,
    although I also recognize that there may be a common thread or two
    with two different situations and individuals. But first, a little
    background...

    I will be 29 years old this month, and I picked up a Bachelor's in
    1998, and a Master's in 1999. Neither degree are in computer science
    or in a related field. I'm currently working in a job that isn't
    related to IT. I'm also a newlywed, and we're planning on starting a
    family in a couple years.

    On my job, there are opportunities for the employees to become
    "superusers". That is, they are very knowledgeable about computers
    and how to do short-cuts and give hints on how to do certain tasks in
    less time. I am one of the superusers, and I've also written guides
    for my fellow co-workers, and demo'ed in front of several people
    before. I am drawing from years of personal experience with
    computers. I started out with a 1MHz Commodore PET computer with 4kb
    of memory, and moved up to a Commodore 64, then a Tandy Color
    Computer, then a Tandy II, and two more computers at home. I also
    used an Amiga as well, and became proficient in BASIC (CBASIC and
    GW-BASIC). I also picked up some COBOL and FORTRAN in high school.
    I even ran an electronic bulletin board at high school and at home,
    both with Telegard hacks running the BBS's, and was the president of
    the school's computer club.

    I now use a 1.6GHz laptop at work, and an ancient 350MHz Pentium II at
    home. I picked up a book on C/C++, and more recently, a book on A+
    certification. I would like to go into IT because it is something I
    would love to do all my life, and it was something I loved doing when
    I was growing up. I didn't go into it at college because I thought
    it was geeky, and being in a geeky job would not exactly score points
    with the girls. I know, stupid of me. I was letting my other head
    think about my life. But that was my train of thought back then.

    I feel like kicking myself for not majoring in Computer Science when I
    had the chance. My question is... is it too late to enter the IT
    field with no IT related college education, and who's working on an
    A+ certificate (with the possibility of moving on the I-Net+ and Net+
    certificates)?

    Thanks for any assistance you may have for me.

    ==============
    For this group's frequently asked questions, check out www.CertFAQ.com
    66boy, Sep 9, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. No, it's not too late, and A+ is a good starting point, it's not
    terribly difficult (it's possible that you could pass it "cold" given
    your experience, but given the exam fees of over $200, I would not
    recommend trying it).

    Be aware, however, that right now the job market is terrible and it's
    not a good time to be entering the field. Still, you may be able to do
    so with your current employer via an "inside track". And the best
    starting point is probably A+ and Network+, then move on to the
    Microsoft certifications MCP, MCSA, MCSE, which, by the way, are FAR
    more difficult.


    66boy wrote:
    > Hi all...
    >
    > I have a question that probably was asked many times before, but as
    > you know, each individual is different, and each situation is unique,
    > although I also recognize that there may be a common thread or two
    > with two different situations and individuals. But first, a little
    > background...
    >
    > I will be 29 years old this month, and I picked up a Bachelor's in
    > 1998, and a Master's in 1999. Neither degree are in computer science
    > or in a related field. I'm currently working in a job that isn't
    > related to IT. I'm also a newlywed, and we're planning on starting a
    > family in a couple years.
    >
    > On my job, there are opportunities for the employees to become
    > "superusers". That is, they are very knowledgeable about computers
    > and how to do short-cuts and give hints on how to do certain tasks in
    > less time. I am one of the superusers, and I've also written guides
    > for my fellow co-workers, and demo'ed in front of several people
    > before. I am drawing from years of personal experience with
    > computers. I started out with a 1MHz Commodore PET computer with 4kb
    > of memory, and moved up to a Commodore 64, then a Tandy Color
    > Computer, then a Tandy II, and two more computers at home. I also
    > used an Amiga as well, and became proficient in BASIC (CBASIC and
    > GW-BASIC). I also picked up some COBOL and FORTRAN in high school.
    > I even ran an electronic bulletin board at high school and at home,
    > both with Telegard hacks running the BBS's, and was the president of
    > the school's computer club.
    >
    > I now use a 1.6GHz laptop at work, and an ancient 350MHz Pentium II at
    > home. I picked up a book on C/C++, and more recently, a book on A+
    > certification. I would like to go into IT because it is something I
    > would love to do all my life, and it was something I loved doing when
    > I was growing up. I didn't go into it at college because I thought
    > it was geeky, and being in a geeky job would not exactly score points
    > with the girls. I know, stupid of me. I was letting my other head
    > think about my life. But that was my train of thought back then.
    >
    > I feel like kicking myself for not majoring in Computer Science when I
    > had the chance. My question is... is it too late to enter the IT
    > field with no IT related college education, and who's working on an
    > A+ certificate (with the possibility of moving on the I-Net+ and Net+
    > certificates)?
    >
    > Thanks for any assistance you may have for me.
    >
    > ==============
    > For this group's frequently asked questions, check out www.CertFAQ.com
    Barry Watzman, Sep 9, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. 66boy

    RussS Guest

    I agreee with Barry here. However I also think that your degrees may have
    some bearing when talking to HR people. Many times they do not care what
    your degree is for as they wish to train you their way, but feel that having
    a degree makes you a better learner - IMB being a case in point.
    RussS, Sep 9, 2003
    #3
  4. 66boy

    Guest

    Very impressive resume! Look at it this way if you were working in IT
    you probably would have been laid off and the wife would be supporting
    you..... then you could hook a job at Home Depot.

    >Hi all...
    >
    >I have a question that probably was asked many times before, but as
    >you know, each individual is different, and each situation is unique,
    >although I also recognize that there may be a common thread or two
    >with two different situations and individuals. But first, a little
    >background...
    >
    >I will be 29 years old this month, and I picked up a Bachelor's in
    >1998, and a Master's in 1999. Neither degree are in computer science
    >or in a related field. I'm currently working in a job that isn't
    >related to IT. I'm also a newlywed, and we're planning on starting a
    >family in a couple years.
    >
    >On my job, there are opportunities for the employees to become
    >"superusers". That is, they are very knowledgeable about computers
    >and how to do short-cuts and give hints on how to do certain tasks in
    >less time. I am one of the superusers, and I've also written guides
    >for my fellow co-workers, and demo'ed in front of several people
    >before. I am drawing from years of personal experience with
    >computers. I started out with a 1MHz Commodore PET computer with 4kb
    >of memory, and moved up to a Commodore 64, then a Tandy Color
    >Computer, then a Tandy II, and two more computers at home. I also
    >used an Amiga as well, and became proficient in BASIC (CBASIC and
    >GW-BASIC). I also picked up some COBOL and FORTRAN in high school.
    >I even ran an electronic bulletin board at high school and at home,
    >both with Telegard hacks running the BBS's, and was the president of
    >the school's computer club.
    >
    >I now use a 1.6GHz laptop at work, and an ancient 350MHz Pentium II at
    >home. I picked up a book on C/C++, and more recently, a book on A+
    >certification. I would like to go into IT because it is something I
    >would love to do all my life, and it was something I loved doing when
    >I was growing up. I didn't go into it at college because I thought
    >it was geeky, and being in a geeky job would not exactly score points
    >with the girls. I know, stupid of me. I was letting my other head
    >think about my life. But that was my train of thought back then.
    >
    >I feel like kicking myself for not majoring in Computer Science when I
    >had the chance. My question is... is it too late to enter the IT
    >field with no IT related college education, and who's working on an
    >A+ certificate (with the possibility of moving on the I-Net+ and Net+
    >certificates)?
    >
    >Thanks for any assistance you may have for me.
    >
    >==============
    >For this group's frequently asked questions, check out www.CertFAQ.com
    , Sep 10, 2003
    #4
  5. 66boy

    jonny bravo Guest

    "Barry Watzman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > No, it's not too late, and A+ is a good starting point, it's not
    > terribly difficult (it's possible that you could pass it "cold" given
    > your experience, but given the exam fees of over $200, I would not
    > recommend trying it).
    >
    > Be aware, however, that right now the job market is terrible and it's
    > not a good time to be entering the field. Still, you may be able to do
    > so with your current employer via an "inside track". And the best
    > starting point is probably A+ and Network+, then move on to the
    > Microsoft certifications MCP, MCSA, MCSE, which, by the way, are FAR
    > more difficult.
    >

    Hell look into your company paying for the CERTS.... you might even get your
    own job title...
    just don't let your company take advantage of your IT skills with out being
    compensated...
    it happens alot ...

    remember don't ever show somebody the cards you hold ..
    unless they are willing to ante up....
    words to live by.... especially in IT...

    Jonny Bravo
    Some Do, Some Don't, Some Will, Some Won't...I Might...
    http://www.boneheadgrafix.com



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 - Release Date: 9/1/2003
    jonny bravo, Sep 10, 2003
    #5
  6. 66boy

    66boy Guest

    Thanks for your advice. I'm aware that IT is in terrible shape right
    now, and I'd like to take this opportunity to basically improve my
    education in the IT field before the economy picks up again. Any
    ideas which subfield in IT has a remotely slightly better chance of
    getting hired in today's market?

    66boy

    > Barry Watzmanwrote:

    No, it's not too late, and A+ is a good starting point, it's not
    > terribly difficult (it's possible that you could pass it "cold"

    given
    > your experience, but given the exam fees of over $200, I would not
    > recommend trying it).
    >
    > Be aware, however, that right now the job market is terrible and

    it's
    > not a good time to be entering the field. Still, you may be able to

    do
    > so with your current employer via an "inside track". And the best
    > starting point is probably A+ and Network+, then move on to the
    > Microsoft certifications MCP, MCSA, MCSE, which, by the way, are FAR


    > more difficult.
    >


    ==============
    For this group's frequently asked questions, check out www.CertFAQ.com
    66boy, Sep 14, 2003
    #6
  7. 66boy

    66boy Guest

    That's very true... things DO happen for a reason. Maybe I was
    destined to get into another field for some reason, perhaps for this
    reason?

    Thanks,
    66boy

    > Anonymouswrote:

    Very impressive resume! Look at it this way if you were working in
    IT
    > you probably would have been laid off and the wife would be

    supporting
    > you..... then you could hook a job at Home Depot.
    >


    ==============
    For this group's frequently asked questions, check out www.CertFAQ.com
    66boy, Sep 14, 2003
    #7
  8. 66boy

    66boy Guest

    Screwy priorities. I wasn't following my heart when deciding to major
    in something other than computer science. I didn't feel that I had
    enough confidence in my abilities to hack it. I realize that I won't
    be fixing up Commodores and program in BASIC in today's world.

    I guess I brought it up because I wanted you to see that I'm not just
    someone who's into it just for the money, and that I know my way
    around a computer better than most non-IT people. I figured, if I
    don't mention it, then I might get blasted for being someone who just
    wants to hop on the IT bandwagon and follow the green, whether it is
    really what they enjoy doing or not.

    66boy

    > Developwebsiteswrote:

    [quote:b55ecd830d]and why bring this up now when you state your BS
    and Masters is not in
    > computers?
    > Why didnt you stay with it? because you lost interest? got bored?
    > the above is much too long ago to be of any use to you now so dont

    even mention
    > it.
    >


    ==============
    For this group's frequently asked questions, check out www.CertFAQ.com
    66boy, Sep 14, 2003
    #8
  9. 66boy

    Pat Guest

    "66boy" <-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:3f646e6c$...
    > I guess I brought it up because I wanted you to see that I'm not just
    > someone who's into it just for the money, and that I know my way
    > around a computer better than most non-IT people. I figured, if I
    > don't mention it, then I might get blasted for being someone who just
    > wants to hop on the IT bandwagon and follow the green, whether it is
    > really what they enjoy doing or not.


    The true test for enjoyment's office rollouts. I hadn't done one in a while
    and just finished a relatively small replacement of less than fifty
    stations, printers, and backend network hardware in two days. There's less
    heavy lifting in producing catalogs and manuals in a bindery and they don't
    usually require 18 hour days to work during and around office hours.

    I think the phone people also there had it a bit easier, and they're still
    on the clock with more hours to go. Same circuit problems I had with their
    T-1, different approach I guess.



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.518 / Virus Database: 316 - Release Date: 9/11/2003
    Pat, Sep 29, 2003
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. partytildawn

    Firefox 1.5 entering FIND mode randomly

    partytildawn, Dec 7, 2005, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    436
    Leonidas Jones
    Dec 7, 2005
  2. Preston Gallwas

    router OSPF 1 - not entering router config

    Preston Gallwas, Jun 30, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    868
    Gordon Smith
    Jul 1, 2004
  3. Keung
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    454
    Keung
    Nov 26, 2004
  4. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    4,939
  5. Martin
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    664
    Plato
    Oct 28, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page