Eneloop purchase...info

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tnom@mucks.net, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I just bought my first set of Eneloops. I have been using two sets
    of two Energizer 2500mah in my Sony DSC- H1 The Energizer is a
    standard NiMH battery that self discharges like all other standard
    NiMH batteries. ( about 1% per day self discharge )

    I charged the two sets of Energizers a week before Christmas. All
    four measured 1.4 volts directly off of the 130ma slow charger.
    Upon taking 100 photos on Christmas through today I only have a
    1/3 battery indication on the camera with the first set of Energizers.
    This used set measures about 1.22 volts. The second set of Energizers
    have sat on the shelf unused and measures only 1.26 volts. They have
    dropped from 1.4 volts to 1.26 volts in just 10 days.

    The Eneloops rated at 2000mah measures 1.3 volts right out of the
    box. They have sat on the shelf for much longer than 10 days.The
    stated self discharge rate is about 15 times less than a standard
    NiMH. This should mean that my Eneloops will drop to 1.26 volts
    in about 5 months instead of 10 days. The gain of minimal self
    discharge should offset the initial lower capacity in that it should
    only take about three weeks for the Energizer 2500's to drop down
    to the 2000mah capacity of the Eneloops.

    *Also found a great SMART charger at Ritz Camera. A four channel
    60 minute charger for 1 through 4 AA/AAA batteries. The charger has
    one LED for each of the four batteries to indicate independently the
    state of charge whether it be Rapid-Red /Trickle,finish-Green /Faulty
    battery-Orange. It is a Quantaray by Sunpak brand charger for only $34
    dollars with four standard NiMH batteries. ( I do not work for Ritz )
     
    , Dec 29, 2006
    #1
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  2. Paul Allen Guest

    On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 20:16:33 -0500
    wrote:

    > I just bought my first set of Eneloops. I have been using two sets
    > of two Energizer 2500mah in my Sony DSC- H1 The Energizer is a
    > standard NiMH battery that self discharges like all other standard
    > NiMH batteries. ( about 1% per day self discharge )
    >
    > I charged the two sets of Energizers a week before Christmas. All
    > four measured 1.4 volts directly off of the 130ma slow charger.
    > Upon taking 100 photos on Christmas through today I only have a
    > 1/3 battery indication on the camera with the first set of Energizers.
    > This used set measures about 1.22 volts. The second set of Energizers
    > have sat on the shelf unused and measures only 1.26 volts. They have
    > dropped from 1.4 volts to 1.26 volts in just 10 days.
    >
    > The Eneloops rated at 2000mah measures 1.3 volts right out of the
    > box. They have sat on the shelf for much longer than 10 days.The
    > stated self discharge rate is about 15 times less than a standard
    > NiMH. This should mean that my Eneloops will drop to 1.26 volts
    > in about 5 months instead of 10 days. The gain of minimal self
    > discharge should offset the initial lower capacity in that it should
    > only take about three weeks for the Energizer 2500's to drop down
    > to the 2000mah capacity of the Eneloops.


    If you put fully-charged sets of your Energizers and your Eneloops on
    the shelf and measure their voltage once a week for a couple months,
    you'll notice that the voltage curve over time is not linear enough
    to make extrapolations as you did above. You'll also end up with
    really interesting data about the actual self-discharge rate of
    Eneloops. A grateful planet would thank you if you post the results
    here. (Make sure the new batteries have been through a couple charge/
    discharge cycles before you start the experiment.)

    Paul Allen
     
    Paul Allen, Dec 29, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest


    >If you put fully-charged sets of your Energizers and your Eneloops on
    >the shelf and measure their voltage once a week for a couple months,
    >you'll notice that the voltage curve over time is not linear enough
    >to make extrapolations as you did above.


    You are correct. I went the right direction but I can't quantify the
    exact numbers. Panasonic R2, Ansman MaxE and others are now also
    offering low self discharge NiMH batteries.

    >You'll also end up with
    >really interesting data about the actual self-discharge rate of
    >Eneloops. A grateful planet would thank you if you post the results
    >here. (Make sure the new batteries have been through a couple charge/
    >discharge cycles before you start the experiment.)
    >

    Storing both types of NiMH batteries in cool places also decreases the
    self discharge rate. I will keep track of the Eneloops and see if they
    fare better than the Energizers for random spontaneous use.
     
    , Dec 29, 2006
    #3
  4. ray Guest

    On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 20:16:33 -0500, tnom wrote:

    > I just bought my first set of Eneloops. I have been using two sets
    > of two Energizer 2500mah in my Sony DSC- H1 The Energizer is a
    > standard NiMH battery that self discharges like all other standard
    > NiMH batteries. ( about 1% per day self discharge )
    >
    > I charged the two sets of Energizers a week before Christmas. All
    > four measured 1.4 volts directly off of the 130ma slow charger.
    > Upon taking 100 photos on Christmas through today I only have a
    > 1/3 battery indication on the camera with the first set of Energizers.
    > This used set measures about 1.22 volts. The second set of Energizers
    > have sat on the shelf unused and measures only 1.26 volts. They have
    > dropped from 1.4 volts to 1.26 volts in just 10 days.
    >
    > The Eneloops rated at 2000mah measures 1.3 volts right out of the
    > box. They have sat on the shelf for much longer than 10 days.The
    > stated self discharge rate is about 15 times less than a standard
    > NiMH. This should mean that my Eneloops will drop to 1.26 volts
    > in about 5 months instead of 10 days.


    If it is linear.

    >The gain of minimal self
    > discharge should offset the initial lower capacity in that it should
    > only take about three weeks for the Energizer 2500's to drop down
    > to the 2000mah capacity of the Eneloops.
    >
    > *Also found a great SMART charger at Ritz Camera. A four channel
    > 60 minute charger for 1 through 4 AA/AAA batteries. The charger has
    > one LED for each of the four batteries to indicate independently the
    > state of charge whether it be Rapid-Red /Trickle,finish-Green /Faulty
    > battery-Orange. It is a Quantaray by Sunpak brand charger for only $34
    > dollars with four standard NiMH batteries. ( I do not work for Ritz )
     
    ray, Dec 29, 2006
    #4
  5. Paul Rubin Guest

    Paul Allen <> writes:
    > to make extrapolations as you did above. You'll also end up with
    > really interesting data about the actual self-discharge rate of
    > Eneloops. A grateful planet would thank you if you post the results
    > here. (Make sure the new batteries have been through a couple charge/
    > discharge cycles before you start the experiment.)


    This has been done many times and Eneloop's claims appear to be true.
    Energizer 2500 mah cells made from certain manufacturing batches have
    also developed unexpectedly fast self-discharge after a few cycles.
     
    Paul Rubin, Dec 29, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest


    >Upon taking 100 photos on Christmas through today I only have a
    >1/3 battery indication on the camera with the first set of Energizers.
    >This used set measures about 1.22 volts


    Using the out of the box Eneloops I just took 150 photos with flash on
    90% of the time, zoom change 10%, AF illuminator on, LCD on 10%,
    LCD playback of all of the pics two times and the battery icon shows
    full and measures at 1.26 volts.
     
    , Dec 29, 2006
    #6
  7. Ron Hunter Guest

    wrote:
    >> Upon taking 100 photos on Christmas through today I only have a
    >> 1/3 battery indication on the camera with the first set of Energizers.
    >> This used set measures about 1.22 volts

    >
    > Using the out of the box Eneloops I just took 150 photos with flash on
    > 90% of the time, zoom change 10%, AF illuminator on, LCD on 10%,
    > LCD playback of all of the pics two times and the battery icon shows
    > full and measures at 1.26 volts.


    That sounds good. I plan to get a couple of sets for my wife's camera
    since her camera use is sporadic, and she won't appreciate finding her
    batteries dead because it has been 3 months since she last used the
    camera.... The way she likes to snap pictures, the disposable types
    CRV3, standard alkaline, Oxy-alkalines, and Lithium disposables would be
    too expensive for the long haul.
     
    Ron Hunter, Dec 29, 2006
    #7
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