Electronics

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by swapna, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. swapna

    swapna Guest

    Electronics refers to the flow of charge (electron) through non-metal
    conductors (often called semi-conductors), where as electrical refers
    to the flow of charge through metal conductors. For example, flow of
    charge through silicon which is not a metal would come under
    electronics whereas flow of charge through copper which is a metal
    would come under electrical. This distinction started around 1908 with
    the invention by Lee De Forest of the valve (triode). Until 1950 this
    field was called "Radio technics" because its principal application
    was the design and theory of radio transmitters and receivers.



    http://electronicstopics.blogspot.com/2008/10/electronics.html
    swapna, Oct 14, 2008
    #1
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  2. swapna

    bok Guest

    swapna wrote:
    > Electronics refers to the flow of charge (electron) through non-metal
    > conductors (often called semi-conductors), where as electrical refers
    > to the flow of charge through metal conductors.


    I disagree with that distinction, for several reasons. Most if not all
    electronic devices include metal conductors such as the pins on an
    integrated circuit, PCB tracks and wires to name a few. To me
    electronics does not exclude the use of and consideration of electrical
    conductors. What do you mean by electrical anyway? Electrical is an
    adjective so it needs to qualify a noun. If you mean 'electrical
    conduction', then why exclude non-metallic transmission media such as
    electrolytes, resistors, gases or even a vacuum (thermionic emission) in
    your definition?

    > For example, flow of charge through silicon which is not a metal would come under
    > electronics whereas flow of charge through copper which is a metal
    > would come under electrical.


    So an electronic engineer changes hats and becomes an electrical
    engineer whenever dealing with wires and PCBs? Sounds kind of contrived
    to me. What is the purpose of your distinction?

    > This distinction started around 1908 with
    > the invention by Lee De Forest of the valve (triode).


    Flemming patented the Vacuum tube Diode a few years earlier. However,
    various people had been experimenting with thermionic effects in the
    late 1800s.

    > Until 1950 this field was called "Radio technics" because its principal application
    > was the design and theory of radio transmitters and receivers.



    > http://electronicstopics.blogspot.com/2008/10/electronics.html


    Your definition seems to be repeated here too:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronics
    bok, Oct 15, 2008
    #2
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  3. In message <gd4gge$guu$>, bok wrote:

    > swapna wrote:
    >
    >> Electronics refers to the flow of charge (electron) through non-metal
    >> conductors (often called semi-conductors), where as electrical refers
    >> to the flow of charge through metal conductors.

    >
    > I disagree with that distinction, for several reasons. Most if not all
    > electronic devices include metal conductors such as the pins on an
    > integrated circuit, PCB tracks and wires to name a few. To me
    > electronics does not exclude the use of and consideration of electrical
    > conductors.


    How about this for a better distinction:

    * electrical engineering is concerned with the flow of electricity for
    energy-transmission purposes.
    * electronic engineering is concerned with the flow of electricity for
    information-transmission (signalling) purposes.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 15, 2008
    #3
  4. swapna

    bok Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <gd4gge$guu$>, bok wrote:
    >
    >> swapna wrote:
    >>
    >>> Electronics refers to the flow of charge (electron) through non-metal
    >>> conductors (often called semi-conductors), where as electrical refers
    >>> to the flow of charge through metal conductors.

    >> I disagree with that distinction, for several reasons. Most if not all
    >> electronic devices include metal conductors such as the pins on an
    >> integrated circuit, PCB tracks and wires to name a few. To me
    >> electronics does not exclude the use of and consideration of electrical
    >> conductors.

    >
    > How about this for a better distinction:
    >
    > * electrical engineering is concerned with the flow of electricity for
    > energy-transmission purposes.
    > * electronic engineering is concerned with the flow of electricity for
    > information-transmission (signalling) purposes.


    I don't have any real issues with that distinction; although, arguably,
    electronics is sometimes considered to be a branch of 'electrical
    engineering'. However, if the intent of the original definition posted
    is to make a distinction between different aspects or branches of
    'electrical' engineering, then that intent is not at all clear.

    Where it said: "electrical refers to the flow of charge through metal
    conductors." -- that sounds like an attempt to attribute the term
    'electrical' to a specific form of conduction; excluding any other forms
    of [electrical] conduction.
    bok, Oct 15, 2008
    #4
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