Electronics Recycling

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Patrick Dunford, Sep 30, 2004.

  1. Question that was posed in Aardvark this morning
    http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2004/0930.shtml

    This page describes what is probably the nearest thing to recycling
    computers or other electronic goods we have got.
    http://www.molten.org.nz/pages/recycling.html
    Molten Media Trust 190 Wordsworth St Christchurch

    I think we have to ask also why the Christchurch City Council will not
    collect more than 2 grades of plastic from the kerbside if there are
    processes that can handle breakdowns of all grades of plastic. No doubt
    this is the question that has taxed the opponents of the new landfill.

    As far as broken down gear goes:
    "Recycling Metals

    Various types of metal are stripped from computers and their components
    on a day-to-day basis before being sold to a scrap metal merchant. What
    is stripped and what is done with it all?

    * The parts from computer case frames are removed. They are sent to a
    metal separation shredder.
    * Covered copper wiring is run though a shredding process that
    separates the PVC coating from the copper.
    * Aluminium cases and disk platters are stripped from hard drives and
    copper yokes from monitor's and TV's as well.
    * Circuit boards are also sold on to a scrap metal merchant who
    stores them locally ready for export.
    * CPU's are separated from the circuit boards. These contain a higher
    value metal and are sold to a metal merchant for export.
    * Various motors are sold on to companies who separate the copper and
    steel within."

    "Recycling Plastics

    Plastic is another major issue when it comes to computer recycling as
    this material is used often in the creation of computer components and
    accessories. We do the following with what we receive:

    * Mixed grades of unidentified soft and hard plastic received are
    stored before being recycled in a 'plastic to diesel plant'. The major
    benefits to the environment of this process are that it can handle
    unidentified and also dirty plastics both of which are a major problem
    for waste plastic recycling.
    * The above process is valuable as it can handle plastics with metal
    screws still attached. This removes many time consuming elements from the
    stripping process.
    * Local plastics recyclers are also sent various plastic based
    packaging used in computer products. These are first cleaned thoroughly
    then shredded and crushed into bricks to de-gas it. These bricks are
    melted and made into logs of solid plastic for export."

    "Recycling Other Materials

    We also recycle the various all the various documentation that normally
    comes with a computer. i.e. Software and other manuals. However not
    everything can be recycled at the present time.

    The tubes from CRT (cathode ray tube) monitors are currently not able to
    be recycled and present a large problem for us. CRT's contain two bad
    chemicals. The front of the screen is made from Berium Glass and the back
    of the tube is made from Lead Glass. Presently these cannot be recycled
    in New Zealand. These are sent overseas for processing.

    Other things not able to be recycled include a variety of computer disks
    that contain unknown grade plastic. A good reason why we should try and
    reuse them as often as possible before throwing them out. "
     
    Patrick Dunford, Sep 30, 2004
    #1
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  2. Patrick Dunford

    JedMeister Guest

    A 'recycling' fee should be added to all products to cover the cost of
    dismantling/recycling. It seems recycling is not really taken seriously in
    this country.

    "Patrick Dunford" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Question that was posed in Aardvark this morning
    > http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2004/0930.shtml
    >
    > This page describes what is probably the nearest thing to recycling
    > computers or other electronic goods we have got.
    > http://www.molten.org.nz/pages/recycling.html
    > Molten Media Trust 190 Wordsworth St Christchurch
    >
    > I think we have to ask also why the Christchurch City Council will not
    > collect more than 2 grades of plastic from the kerbside if there are
    > processes that can handle breakdowns of all grades of plastic. No doubt
    > this is the question that has taxed the opponents of the new landfill.
    >
    > As far as broken down gear goes:
    > "Recycling Metals
    >
    > Various types of metal are stripped from computers and their components
    > on a day-to-day basis before being sold to a scrap metal merchant. What
    > is stripped and what is done with it all?
    >
    > * The parts from computer case frames are removed. They are sent to a
    > metal separation shredder.
    > * Covered copper wiring is run though a shredding process that
    > separates the PVC coating from the copper.
    > * Aluminium cases and disk platters are stripped from hard drives and
    > copper yokes from monitor's and TV's as well.
    > * Circuit boards are also sold on to a scrap metal merchant who
    > stores them locally ready for export.
    > * CPU's are separated from the circuit boards. These contain a higher
    > value metal and are sold to a metal merchant for export.
    > * Various motors are sold on to companies who separate the copper and
    > steel within."
    >
    > "Recycling Plastics
    >
    > Plastic is another major issue when it comes to computer recycling as
    > this material is used often in the creation of computer components and
    > accessories. We do the following with what we receive:
    >
    > * Mixed grades of unidentified soft and hard plastic received are
    > stored before being recycled in a 'plastic to diesel plant'. The major
    > benefits to the environment of this process are that it can handle
    > unidentified and also dirty plastics both of which are a major problem
    > for waste plastic recycling.
    > * The above process is valuable as it can handle plastics with metal
    > screws still attached. This removes many time consuming elements from the
    > stripping process.
    > * Local plastics recyclers are also sent various plastic based
    > packaging used in computer products. These are first cleaned thoroughly
    > then shredded and crushed into bricks to de-gas it. These bricks are
    > melted and made into logs of solid plastic for export."
    >
    > "Recycling Other Materials
    >
    > We also recycle the various all the various documentation that normally
    > comes with a computer. i.e. Software and other manuals. However not
    > everything can be recycled at the present time.
    >
    > The tubes from CRT (cathode ray tube) monitors are currently not able to
    > be recycled and present a large problem for us. CRT's contain two bad
    > chemicals. The front of the screen is made from Berium Glass and the back
    > of the tube is made from Lead Glass. Presently these cannot be recycled
    > in New Zealand. These are sent overseas for processing.
    >
    > Other things not able to be recycled include a variety of computer disks
    > that contain unknown grade plastic. A good reason why we should try and
    > reuse them as often as possible before throwing them out. "
    >
     
    JedMeister, Sep 30, 2004
    #2
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  3. Patrick Dunford

    JohnO Guest

    <top post corrected>

    "JedMeister" <> wrote in message
    news:yZJ6d.8193$...
    > "Patrick Dunford" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Question that was posed in Aardvark this morning
    > > http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2004/0930.shtml
    > >
    > > This page describes what is probably the nearest thing to recycling
    > > computers or other electronic goods we have got.
    > > http://www.molten.org.nz/pages/recycling.html
    > > Molten Media Trust 190 Wordsworth St Christchurch
    > >
    > > I think we have to ask also why the Christchurch City Council will not
    > > collect more than 2 grades of plastic from the kerbside if there are
    > > processes that can handle breakdowns of all grades of plastic. No doubt
    > > this is the question that has taxed the opponents of the new landfill.
    > >
    > > As far as broken down gear goes:
    > > "Recycling Metals
    > >
    > > Various types of metal are stripped from computers and their components
    > > on a day-to-day basis before being sold to a scrap metal merchant. What
    > > is stripped and what is done with it all?
    > >
    > > * The parts from computer case frames are removed. They are sent to

    a
    > > metal separation shredder.
    > > * Covered copper wiring is run though a shredding process that
    > > separates the PVC coating from the copper.
    > > * Aluminium cases and disk platters are stripped from hard drives

    and
    > > copper yokes from monitor's and TV's as well.
    > > * Circuit boards are also sold on to a scrap metal merchant who
    > > stores them locally ready for export.
    > > * CPU's are separated from the circuit boards. These contain a

    higher
    > > value metal and are sold to a metal merchant for export.
    > > * Various motors are sold on to companies who separate the copper

    and
    > > steel within."
    > >
    > > "Recycling Plastics
    > >
    > > Plastic is another major issue when it comes to computer recycling as
    > > this material is used often in the creation of computer components and
    > > accessories. We do the following with what we receive:
    > >
    > > * Mixed grades of unidentified soft and hard plastic received are
    > > stored before being recycled in a 'plastic to diesel plant'. The major
    > > benefits to the environment of this process are that it can handle
    > > unidentified and also dirty plastics both of which are a major problem
    > > for waste plastic recycling.
    > > * The above process is valuable as it can handle plastics with metal
    > > screws still attached. This removes many time consuming elements from

    the
    > > stripping process.
    > > * Local plastics recyclers are also sent various plastic based
    > > packaging used in computer products. These are first cleaned thoroughly
    > > then shredded and crushed into bricks to de-gas it. These bricks are
    > > melted and made into logs of solid plastic for export."
    > >
    > > "Recycling Other Materials
    > >
    > > We also recycle the various all the various documentation that normally
    > > comes with a computer. i.e. Software and other manuals. However not
    > > everything can be recycled at the present time.
    > >
    > > The tubes from CRT (cathode ray tube) monitors are currently not able to
    > > be recycled and present a large problem for us. CRT's contain two bad
    > > chemicals. The front of the screen is made from Berium Glass and the

    back
    > > of the tube is made from Lead Glass. Presently these cannot be recycled
    > > in New Zealand. These are sent overseas for processing.
    > >
    > > Other things not able to be recycled include a variety of computer disks
    > > that contain unknown grade plastic. A good reason why we should try and
    > > reuse them as often as possible before throwing them out. "
    > >

    >
    >
    > A 'recycling' fee should be added to all products to cover the cost of
    > dismantling/recycling. It seems recycling is not really taken seriously in
    > this country.
    >


    As in a tax? Nice idea but it would be just like the petrol tax - it would
    go straight to the consolidated fund and never go near a recycling
    operation.
     
    JohnO, Sep 30, 2004
    #3
  4. It seems like Thu, 30 Sep 2004 14:19:51 +1200 was when "JohnO"
    <> said Blah blah blah...

    ><top post corrected>


    To be honest, I didn't mind the top post, because I didn't have to
    scroll down to see the message. I have a habit in Agent, that if the
    comment is so far down that I have to scroll down (using 12pt fonts on
    a 1024x768 screen), then I can't be bothered reading them.
    --
    Regards,
    Waylon Kenning.

    1st Year B.I.T. WelTec
     
    Waylon Kenning, Sep 30, 2004
    #4
  5. Out from under a rock popped Waylon Kenning and said

    > It seems like Thu, 30 Sep 2004 14:19:51 +1200 was when "JohnO"
    > <> said Blah blah blah...
    >
    >><top post corrected>

    >
    > To be honest, I didn't mind the top post, because I didn't have to
    > scroll down to see the message. I have a habit in Agent, that if the
    > comment is so far down that I have to scroll down (using 12pt fonts on
    > a 1024x768 screen), then I can't be bothered reading them.


    I thought it was particularly funny correcting one breach of netiquette
    while commiting another. Personally I dislike top posting and have been
    abandoning reading a lot of threads recently in various NGs due to top
    posting losing the context. I don't see why I should have to spend time
    trying to work out what particular point the author is replying to.

    --
    rob singers
    pull finger to reply
    Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
     
    Robert Singers, Sep 30, 2004
    #5
  6. JedMeister wrote:
    > A 'recycling' fee should be added to all products to cover the cost of
    > dismantling/recycling. It seems recycling is not really taken seriously in
    > this country.



    This has happen in California as of July on monitors and TV's.
     
    Alan Liefting, Sep 30, 2004
    #6

  7. >>
    >>A 'recycling' fee should be added to all products to cover the cost of
    >>dismantling/recycling. It seems recycling is not really taken seriously in
    >>this country.
    >>

    >
    >
    > As in a tax? Nice idea but it would be just like the petrol tax - it would
    > go straight to the consolidated fund and never go near a recycling
    > operation.
    >
    >


    The best option as I see it is a "takeback" scheme or "extended producer
    responsibility".

    This is not a tax.

    These schemes tell the manufacturers something like "over the next x
    years you MUST take back your product for recycling and by the year
    xxxx you will recycle xx% of your product."
     
    Alan Liefting, Sep 30, 2004
    #7
  8. Patrick Dunford wrote:
    > Question that was posed in Aardvark this morning
    > http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2004/0930.shtml
    >
    > This page describes what is probably the nearest thing to recycling
    > computers or other electronic goods we have got.
    > http://www.molten.org.nz/pages/recycling.html
    > Molten Media Trust 190 Wordsworth St Christchurch
    >


    Molten Media are doing but a drop in the bucket of the total e-waste in
    Chch. It is however better than nothing. Unfortunately, as far as I
    can tell, the recovered circuit boards are sent to China for processing.
    China is a dumping ground for e-waste and the processing of this waste
    is causinf environmental havoc.

    See also http:www.ban.org
     
    Alan Liefting, Sep 30, 2004
    #8

  9. >
    > * Mixed grades of unidentified soft and hard plastic received are
    > stored before being recycled in a 'plastic to diesel plant'. The major
    > benefits to the environment of this process are that it can handle
    > unidentified and also dirty plastics both of which are a major problem
    > for waste plastic recycling.
    >


    This is a little disingeuous. This 'plastic to diesel plant' does not
    exist in NZ as yet. Apparently only two such plants exist in other
    parts of the world.
     
    Alan Liefting, Sep 30, 2004
    #9

  10. >
    > I think we have to ask also why the Christchurch City Council will not
    > collect more than 2 grades of plastic from the kerbside if there are
    > processes that can handle breakdowns of all grades of plastic. No doubt
    > this is the question that has taxed the opponents of the new landfill.
    >


    It comes down to cost. All other plastics are only discarded in small
    amounts, are difficult to seperate and are not easily recycled in NZ
    hence the higher cost.

    See also http://www.ccc.govt.nz/Waste/Recycling/Plastic.asp
     
    Alan Liefting, Sep 30, 2004
    #10
  11. Patrick Dunford

    Edmund Good Guest

    I think you will find that the most (but not not all) of the staff are not
    paid but are volunteers at Molten Media. While MM efforts are admirable, I
    don't think they would be viable if they had to pay all the staff.



    On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 13:35:40 +1200, Patrick Dunford wrote:

    >Question that was posed in Aardvark this morning
    >http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2004/0930.shtml
    >
    >This page describes what is probably the nearest thing to recycling
    >computers or other electronic goods we have got.
    >http://www.molten.org.nz/pages/recycling.html
    >Molten Media Trust 190 Wordsworth St Christchurch
    >
    >I think we have to ask also why the Christchurch City Council will not
    >collect more than 2 grades of plastic from the kerbside if there are
    >processes that can handle breakdowns of all grades of plastic. No doubt
    >this is the question that has taxed the opponents of the new landfill.
     
    Edmund Good, Sep 30, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <> in nz.comp on Thu, 30 Sep 2004
    17:09:01 +1200, Alan Liefting <> says...
    >
    >
    > >
    > > I think we have to ask also why the Christchurch City Council will not
    > > collect more than 2 grades of plastic from the kerbside if there are
    > > processes that can handle breakdowns of all grades of plastic. No doubt
    > > this is the question that has taxed the opponents of the new landfill.
    > >

    >
    > It comes down to cost. All other plastics are only discarded in small
    > amounts, are difficult to seperate and are not easily recycled in NZ
    > hence the higher cost.


    Wasn't the claim of the Hurunui people opposing Kate Valley, to the effec
    tthat Hurunui Plastics was recycling much more plastic than the CCC?
     
    Patrick Dunford, Sep 30, 2004
    #12
  13. Patrick Dunford

    ? Wit Guest

    "Alan Liefting" <> wrote in message news:...
    >
    > >
    > > * Mixed grades of unidentified soft and hard plastic received are
    > > stored before being recycled in a 'plastic to diesel plant'. The major
    > > benefits to the environment of this process are that it can handle
    > > unidentified and also dirty plastics both of which are a major problem
    > > for waste plastic recycling.
    > >

    >
    > This is a little disingeuous.

    Correct spelling is disingenuous

    This 'plastic to diesel plant' does not
    > exist in NZ as yet. Apparently only two such plants exist in other
    > parts of the world.
    >
     
    ? Wit, Oct 1, 2004
    #13
  14. Patrick Dunford

    richard Guest

    Robert Singers wrote:

    > I thought it was particularly funny correcting one breach of netiquette
    > while commiting another. Personally I dislike top posting and have been
    > abandoning reading a lot of threads recently in various NGs due to top
    > posting losing the context. I don't see why I should have to spend time
    > trying to work out what particular point the author is replying to.


    Its called a threaded view. Every newsreader can do it.
     
    richard, Oct 1, 2004
    #14
  15. Patrick Dunford

    Rob Singers Guest

    Out from under a rock popped richard and said

    > Robert Singers wrote:
    >
    >> I thought it was particularly funny correcting one breach of
    >> netiquette while commiting another. Personally I dislike top posting
    >> and have been abandoning reading a lot of threads recently in various
    >> NGs due to top posting losing the context. I don't see why I should
    >> have to spend time trying to work out what particular point the
    >> author is replying to.

    >
    > Its called a threaded view. Every newsreader can do it.


    I'll type slowly so hopefully you can understand.

    When someone makes five points in a post, and then someone replies to the
    post with a top post, making one comment, you may not know which of the
    five points the top poster is replying to. Do you understand why a
    thread news reader doesn't help?

    And by the way it is is shortened it's, not its.



    --
    rob singers
    pull finger to reply
    Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
     
    Rob Singers, Oct 3, 2004
    #15
  16. Patrick Dunford

    Paul Wilkins Guest

    Rob Singers wrote:
    > When someone makes five points in a post, and then someone replies to the
    > post with a top post, making one comment, you may not know which of the
    > five points the top poster is replying to.


    To follow up, this rule about replying below the appropriate text has
    been codified as a part of Internet Law since 1995. Here is an extract
    from RFC 1855

    RFC 1855 - Netiquette Guidelines
    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1855.html

    - If you are sending a reply to a message or a posting be sure you
    summarize the original at the top of the message, or include just
    enough text of the original to give a context. This will make
    sure readers understand when they start to read your response.
    Since NetNews, especially, is proliferated by distributing the
    postings from one host to another, it is possible to see a
    response to a message before seeing the original. Giving context
    helps everyone. But do not include the entire original!

    --
    Paul Wilkins
     
    Paul Wilkins, Oct 3, 2004
    #16
  17. Patrick Dunford

    KewlKiwi Guest

    Rob Singers wrote:
    <snip>
    > And by the way it is is shortened it's, not its.


    Tsk, you should have put single quote marks around the 'it is' Rob! [grin]

    How about:
    And by the way, 'it is' is shortened [to] it's, not its.

    Just invoking Skitt's rule, you understand...

    Bob
     
    KewlKiwi, Oct 4, 2004
    #17
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