electrical wiring

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by George, Oct 28, 2005.

  1. George

    George Guest

    In the USA, the ground wire in typical house wiring is connected to the
    "common" side in the breaker box. The question is this: In older
    applications, where there is no third wire existing, can the ground terminal
    of the outlet be connected to the common side with the same result?
    George, Oct 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. George

    Mitch Guest

    In article <E2q8f.11505$Ix3.3271@dukeread05>, George
    <> wrote:

    > In the USA, the ground wire in typical house wiring is connected to the
    > "common" side in the breaker box. The question is this: In older
    > applications, where there is no third wire existing, can the ground terminal
    > of the outlet be connected to the common side with the same result?
    >
    >


    No; and I think this is illegal in most areas.

    If you are trying to ground a house with no grounding, the simplest you
    can probably do amounts to running a wire from a (sunken) cold water
    supply line through the wall to ground in the outlet.
    Mitch, Oct 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. George

    Shep© Guest

    On Fri, 28 Oct 2005 15:40:01 GMT If you fall from a tree,leave your
    anger on the branch and then Mitch <> sent this :

    >In article <E2q8f.11505$Ix3.3271@dukeread05>, George
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> In the USA, the ground wire in typical house wiring is connected to the
    >> "common" side in the breaker box. The question is this: In older
    >> applications, where there is no third wire existing, can the ground terminal
    >> of the outlet be connected to the common side with the same result?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >No; and I think this is illegal in most areas.
    >
    >If you are trying to ground a house with no grounding, the simplest you
    >can probably do amounts to running a wire from a (sunken) cold water
    >supply line through the wall to ground in the outlet.


    What he said.



    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
    Shep©, Oct 28, 2005
    #3
  4. George

    Keme Guest

    George wrote:
    > In the USA, the ground wire in typical house wiring is connected to the
    > "common" side in the breaker box. The question is this: In older
    > applications, where there is no third wire existing, can the ground terminal
    > of the outlet be connected to the common side with the same result?
    >
    >

    Not sure if I'm reading you right, but for safety's sake:

    The "common" or "neutral" wire carries power. In the event of cable
    failure, this line may get a voltage equal to the "live" line. If
    "common" is connected to appliance grounding without being physically
    grounded, the failure situation will bring the voltage to the chassis of
    the appliance. That's exactly the opposite of what you want grounding to do.

    Moreover, if you install grounded outlets, at least do it for entire
    rooms at a time. The rooms where grounding is most important are
    bathroom and kitchen, because with the wet conditions or the kitchen
    sink your body can easily become a grounding path for stray currents. We
    ground appliances to provide an easier way for these stray currents to
    flow. If, in a different rom, you touch a grounded appliance and an
    ungrounded at the same time, and the ungrounded one fails, your body
    becomes the grounding path because of the grounded appliance. Then you
    may be grounded, literally and permanently ...
    Keme, Oct 30, 2005
    #4
  5. George

    ellis_jay Guest

    Keme wrote:
    > George wrote:
    >> In the USA, the ground wire in typical house wiring is connected to
    >> the "common" side in the breaker box. The question is this: In
    >> older applications, where there is no third wire existing, can the
    >> ground terminal of the outlet be connected to the common side with
    >> the same result?
    >>
    >>

    > Not sure if I'm reading you right, but for safety's sake:
    >
    > The "common" or "neutral" wire carries power. In the event of cable
    > failure, this line may get a voltage equal to the "live" line. If
    > "common" is connected to appliance grounding without being physically
    > grounded, the failure situation will bring the voltage to the chassis
    > of the appliance. That's exactly the opposite of what you want
    > grounding to do.
    >
    > Moreover, if you install grounded outlets, at least do it for entire
    > rooms at a time.



    >The rooms where grounding is most important are
    > bathroom and kitchen, because with the wet conditions or the kitchen
    > sink


    It seems that code requires in new construction (or re-fits) that GFCI's
    (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt) plugs be installed no closer than 6 feet
    of a sink, tub, or whatever, and that the power running from the breaker
    box (source) to these areas (field) first be run to the GFCI closest in
    distance to the breaker box.


    >your body can easily become a grounding path for stray currents.
    > We ground appliances to provide an easier way for these stray
    > currents to flow. If, in a different rom, you touch a grounded
    > appliance and an ungrounded at the same time, and the ungrounded one
    > fails, your body becomes the grounding path because of the grounded
    > appliance. Then you
    > may be grounded, literally and permanently ...


    --

    Their ethics are a short summary of police ordinances: for them the
    most important thing is to be a useful member of the state, and to air
    their opinions in the club of an evening; they have never felt the
    homesickness for something unknown and far away, nor the depths which
    consists in being nothing at all. ___________Soren Kierkegaard

    Ellis_jay
    ellis_jay, Oct 30, 2005
    #5
  6. George

    Mitch Guest

    In article <>, ellis_jay
    <> wrote:

    > >The rooms where grounding is most important are
    > > bathroom and kitchen, because with the wet conditions or the kitchen
    > > sink

    >
    > It seems that code requires in new construction (or re-fits) that GFCI's
    > (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt) plugs be installed no closer than 6 feet
    > of a sink, tub, or whatever, and that the power running from the breaker
    > box (source) to these areas (field) first be run to the GFCI closest in
    > distance to the breaker box.


    In such code, a GFCI is required for any receptacle _within_ six feet
    of a water hazard.

    And certainly, the GFCI has to be the receptacle closer to the service.
    Receptacles after that point are protected by that GFCI, so you don't
    have to have a GFCI in further receptacles on the same circuit.
    Mitch, Oct 30, 2005
    #6
  7. George

    philo Guest

    "Keme" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > George wrote:
    >> In the USA, the ground wire in typical house wiring is connected to the
    >> "common" side in the breaker box. The question is this: In older
    >> applications, where there is no third wire existing, can the ground
    >> terminal
    >> of the outlet be connected to the common side with the same result?
    >>

    <snip>

    i know this is an old thread...but for the sake of safety i'll reply:

    the answer is NO!!!! a third (green) ground wire is *required*
    philo, Oct 30, 2005
    #7
  8. George

    ellis_jay Guest

    Mitch wrote:
    > In article <>, ellis_jay
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>> The rooms where grounding is most important are
    >>> bathroom and kitchen, because with the wet conditions or the kitchen
    >>> sink

    >>
    >> It seems that code requires in new construction (or re-fits) that
    >> GFCI's (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt) plugs be installed no
    >> closer than 6 feet of a sink, tub, or whatever, and that the power
    >> running from the breaker box (source) to these areas (field) first
    >> be run to the GFCI closest in distance to the breaker box.

    >
    > In such code, a GFCI is required for any receptacle _within_ six feet


    Yes, you are right in that.

    > of a water hazard.
    >
    > And certainly, the GFCI has to be the receptacle closer to the
    > service. Receptacles after that point are protected by that GFCI, so
    > you don't have to have a GFCI in further receptacles on the same
    > circuit.


    --

    Their ethics are a short summary of police ordinances: for them the
    most important thing is to be a useful member of the state, and to air
    their opinions in the club of an evening; they have never felt the
    homesickness for something unknown and far away, nor the depths which
    consists in being nothing at all. ___________Soren Kierkegaard

    Ellis_jay
    ellis_jay, Oct 30, 2005
    #8
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