Electrical problem

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Oldus Fartus, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. Oldus Fartus

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    CooTer wrote:
    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    > power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I checked,
    > none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still not
    > restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    > plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was just
    > installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was burnt or
    > melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or
    > at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    > there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > And info appreciated.
    > Thanks.
    >
    >


    Where did you measure the voltages - at the switchboard or at one of the
    affected outlets?

    It sounds to me like a short somewhere in the wiring for those four
    outlets, and the 12.5 ohms between active and neutral supports this,
    along with both being at approximately the same voltage relative to
    ground. Because they are both at near enough to the same voltage, I
    would not expect to get a voltage reading between the two - or else so
    small a reading it may very well have been discounted as a meter error.

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    Oldus Fartus, Jan 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. Oldus Fartus

    CooTer Guest

    I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I checked,
    none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still not
    restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was just
    installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was burnt or
    melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or
    at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:

    Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz

    So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    And info appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
    CooTer, Jan 31, 2004
    #2
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  3. Oldus Fartus

    docmill Guest

    "CooTer" <> wrote in
    news:bvfinv$rn4od$-berlin.de:

    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    > about... I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house
    > when I lost power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a
    > breaker so I checked, none tripped. I turned each one off and on again
    > and power was still not restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall
    > where I had the compressor plugged in and all the wiring still appears
    > new, tough, like it was just installed (house is a mere 7 years old)
    > in other words, nothing was burnt or melted within the wall of the
    > said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or at the breaker panel. I
    > got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but
    > would there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > And info appreciated.
    > Thanks.
    >
    >

    You need to go get a 3 prong outlet analyzer. Get it at the hardware store
    or elec. shop. It will tell you, if you have a problem on any fault line.
    You should not have 120 V between neutral and ground. Small investment and
    a time saver.

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    docmill, Jan 31, 2004
    #3
  4. Oldus Fartus

    Unk Guest

    Check the voltage on each breaker's out-terminal. A breaker could be fused
    in the open mode.

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 01:42:12 -0500, "CooTer" <> wrote:

    >I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    >I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    >power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I checked,
    >none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still not
    >restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    >plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was just
    >installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was burnt or
    >melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or
    >at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    >Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    >12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    >125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    >So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    >What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    >there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    >And info appreciated.
    >Thanks.
    >
     
    Unk, Jan 31, 2004
    #4
  5. Oldus Fartus

    docmill Guest

    There should only be 1 breaker to check. 4 outlets went down, and they
    have to be on the same circut. How many should he check for that circut?
    Aw-mm open is no current flowing. Closed is normal unless shorted,
    then, depending on the wiring to his box, the big breaker, would have went.



    Unk <> wrote in
    news::

    > Check the voltage on each breaker's out-terminal. A breaker could be
    > fused in the open mode.
    >
    > On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 01:42:12 -0500, "CooTer" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    >>about... I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house
    >>when I lost power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a
    >>breaker so I checked, none tripped. I turned each one off and on again
    >>and power was still not restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall
    >>where I had the compressor plugged in and all the wiring still appears
    >>new, tough, like it was just installed (house is a mere 7 years old)
    >>in other words, nothing was burnt or melted within the wall of the
    >>said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or at the breaker panel. I
    >>got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >>
    >>Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    >>12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    >>125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >>124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >>
    >>So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    >>What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but
    >>would there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    >>And info appreciated.
    >>Thanks.
    >>

    >




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    docmill, Jan 31, 2004
    #5
  6. Oldus Fartus

    Miss Tawni Guest

    Sounds like a breaker, but I agree with doc, you shouldn't have 120V from
    neutral to ground. Might want to look at the junction(s) for that circuit
    between the faulted outlets and the box, if any/accessible.

    CooTer wrote:
    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    > about...
    > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I
    > lost power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I
    > checked, none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power
    > was still not restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had
    > the compressor plugged in and all the wiring still appears new,
    > tough, like it was just installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in
    > other words, nothing was burnt or melted within the wall of the said
    > outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or at the breaker panel. I got
    > a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but
    > would there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > And info appreciated.
    > Thanks.
     
    Miss Tawni, Jan 31, 2004
    #6
  7. Oldus Fartus

    docmill Guest

    OK, no voltage between hot and neutral. Hot to ground and Neutral to
    ground are both 120 V. You simply plug in the little 3 prong analyzer
    in the outlets from the bad one to the box. Personally, I think he misread
    the meter.


    "Miss Tawni" <> wrote in
    news:ZVISb.3707$:

    > Sounds like a breaker, but I agree with doc, you shouldn't have 120V from
    > neutral to ground. Might want to look at the junction(s) for that circuit
    > between the faulted outlets and the box, if any/accessible.
    >
    > CooTer wrote:
    >> I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    >> about...
    >> I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I
    >> lost power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I
    >> checked, none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power
    >> was still not restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had
    >> the compressor plugged in and all the wiring still appears new,
    >> tough, like it was just installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in
    >> other words, nothing was burnt or melted within the wall of the said
    >> outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or at the breaker panel. I got
    >> a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >>
    >> Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    >> 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    >> 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >> 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >>
    >> So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    >> What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but
    >> would there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    >> And info appreciated.
    >> Thanks.

    >
    >




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    docmill, Jan 31, 2004
    #7
  8. Oldus Fartus

    SgtMinor Guest

    Check all four outlets. One may have loose connections - or gotten
    fried - upstream from the one you looked at.

    Are you sure you're getting 440v to the panel? 240 would be more
    likely.

    CooTer wrote:
    >
    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    > power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I checked,
    > none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still not
    > restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    > plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was just
    > installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was burnt or
    > melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or
    > at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    > there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > And info appreciated.
    > Thanks.
     
    SgtMinor, Jan 31, 2004
    #8
  9. Oldus Fartus

    CooTer Guest

    No, I didn't misread the meter. I just metered it again and its still the
    same


    *12.5 ohms* between the *black* & *white* wires, *no voltage*.
    *125 VAC* from the *white* wire to *ground*, 60 Hz
    *125.1 VAC* from the *black* wire to *ground*, 60 Hz

    Tell me where I may have miss read the meter, then tell me how to read a
    meter correctly (since metering resistance & voltage is part of my everyday
    job) and I will do it on your terms.


    docmill wrote:
    > Personally, I think he misread the meter
     
    CooTer, Jan 31, 2004
    #9
  10. Oldus Fartus

    CooTer Guest

    Yes its 440, who ever lived here before us had some huge mechanical
    eqiuipment in the garage for some reason.

    SgtMinor wrote:
    > Check all four outlets. One may have loose connections - or gotten
    > fried - upstream from the one you looked at.
    >
    > Are you sure you're getting 440v to the panel? 240 would be more
    > likely.
    >
    > CooTer wrote
     
    CooTer, Jan 31, 2004
    #10
  11. Oldus Fartus

    Norm Guest

    "CooTer" <> wrote in message
    news:bvfinv$rn4od$-berlin.de...
    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    > blah, blah, blah


    I'd bet there is a GFIC breaker up stream on the same circuit.

    Same thing happened to me. Outlet went dead in garage. GFI was tripped in
    upstairs guest bath.
     
    Norm, Jan 31, 2004
    #11
  12. Oldus Fartus

    Mellowed Guest

    I think that you should get an Electrician to sort this one out. You
    should only have 240VAC coming from the street. The Neutral wire when
    compared to either hot line of the 240V should read 120V. The house
    voltage is split at the junction box so that some circuits are using one
    side of the 240V and other circuits are using the other side. For
    example, maybe the lights are using one phase and the wall outlets are
    using the other phase. Every other Circuit Breaker is using the opposite
    phase.

    Ideally you should have Zero Volts from the white wire to ground. Any
    voltage between the two is a 'ground loop' as the neutral (white) wire
    should be grounded. Any voltage between the two is caused by current
    and should only be in the magnitude of a few volts at most.

    I'm not comfortable with how I expressed the above statement. The
    bottom line is that you should get an Electrician to sort it out.



    "CooTer" <> wrote in message
    news:bvfinv$rn4od$-berlin.de...
    : I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    about...
    : I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I
    lost
    : power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I
    checked,
    : none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still
    not
    : restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    : plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was
    just
    : installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was
    burnt or
    : melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything
    nearby or
    : at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    :
    : Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    : 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    : 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    : 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    :
    : So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    : What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but
    would
    : there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    : And info appreciated.
    : Thanks.
    :
    :


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    Mellowed, Jan 31, 2004
    #12
  13. Oldus Fartus

    Willard Guest

    "CooTer" <> wrote in message news:<bvfinv$rn4od$-berlin.de>...
    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    > power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I checked,
    > none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still not
    > restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    > plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was just
    > installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was burnt or
    > melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or
    > at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    > there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > And info appreciated.
    > Thanks.


    For a standard "house panel" there should be "no voltage measured
    anywhere over 240 volts", regardless of open circuits, shortcircuits
    or grounding on any of the loadside or lineside wires.. The problem
    obviously is in the line side feeder connection, grounding or utility
    transformer.. From your measurements I suspect an unothodox connection
    from a 440v system to your 240/120v "house panel" possibly involving
    the ground circuit as a current carrying lead.. I would definitely
    advise that a "certified electrician" should check out your "house
    panel"..
     
    Willard, Jan 31, 2004
    #13
  14. Oldus Fartus

    Westlaker Guest

    "Willard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "CooTer" <> wrote in message

    news:<bvfinv$rn4od$-berlin.de>...
    > > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking about...
    > > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I lost
    > > power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I

    checked,
    > > none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power was still not
    > > restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had the compressor
    > > plugged in and all the wiring still appears new, tough, like it was just
    > > installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in other words, nothing was

    burnt or
    > > melted within the wall of the said outlet nor did I smell anything

    nearby or
    > > at the breaker panel. I got a multimeter and took some measurements:
    > >
    > > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > >
    > > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    > > there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > > And info appreciated.
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > For a standard "house panel" there should be "no voltage measured
    > anywhere over 240 volts", regardless of open circuits, shortcircuits
    > or grounding on any of the loadside or lineside wires.. The problem
    > obviously is in the line side feeder connection, grounding or utility
    > transformer.. From your measurements I suspect an unothodox connection
    > from a 440v system to your 240/120v "house panel" possibly involving
    > the ground circuit as a current carrying lead.. I would definitely
    > advise that a "certified electrician" should check out your "house
    > panel"..


    If your in North America, You should have three #2 or heavier wires at the
    top of your panel.
    Ideally they will be coloured Red Black & White,..This is referred to as
    120/240 3 wire
    Red & Black are both Hot and should read 240v between them.
    The White is the neutral, and is grounded. Between the White and either the
    Red or Black
    you should read 120 v.
    At no time should you get a voltage between the White and ground. If you do,
    it indicates that
    the neutral is open somewhere. The most common cause of this is a burnt
    connection in a box
    somewhere in the wall, caused by a loose connection...
    This was common when they used Aluminum wiring some time ago.
    It can still happen today however, so you will have to open up all the boxes
    one by one and
    visually look for the bad connection...Good luck...
     
    Westlaker, Feb 1, 2004
    #14
  15. Oldus Fartus

    Bill Guest

    Coo Ter wrote:


    >12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    >125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    >So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    >What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but would
    >there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    >And info appreciated.
    >Thanks.


    Hi,

    You have on open neutral upstream of the affected outlets. The reason you
    measure 120v on the white wire is that a load is present(light bulb, battery
    charger or the like). If you plug in an outlet tester it will most likely say
    that the ground and neutral are reversed, a comman fault of these type testers
    with open neutral problems.

    An open neutral could be caused by a defective GFI, as well as a loose
    connection. Worst case might be a nail in the Romex inside a wall.



    =

    Bill
    MrHandiman.com
    North Myrtle Beach,SC
     
    Bill, Feb 1, 2004
    #15
  16. Oldus Fartus

    CooTer Guest

    I found part of the problem. the 1st outlet on this circuit where the main
    feed comes to the outlet and feeds the rest of the circuit I found the
    *black* wire musta got hot and burnt to ground where it took a chunk out of
    the ground wire and burnt the end of the black wire in two. Naturally, I cut
    the bad parts of the ground and black wire off and re connected with the
    same problem. Turns out, the wiring from the 1st outlet to the last is fine.
    I jerry rigged an extension cord (dangerous I know but without proper
    testing equipment, the hillbilly way is best!) and stuck the wires that feed
    the rest of the circuit into the plug in end of the cord, plugged the other
    end of the cord into a working outlet and wah lah, it works. Now, I'm left
    with the problem from the main feed wire feeding this circuit back to the
    box. I got the multimeter and took some more measurements:

    Black wire to ground = 125VAC
    White wire to ground = 0VAC
    Black wire to white wire = 0VAC

    Black wire to white wire resistance = open (tested with breaker on and off)
    Black wire to ground resistance (tested with breaker on and off) =
    open-breaker off/jumpy-breaker on
    White wire to ground resistance (tested with breaker on and off) = open

    I have an electrician coming tomorrow to check into it. Hopefully the wire
    is good and something happened in the box.

    In response to those who are wondering about the 440V incoming, I have two
    boxes in the garage. one is a box, same size as the next with a label that
    says "440VAC Disconnect main prior to servicing" and it has 2 breakers, a
    main and one slightly smaller looking one. Right beside it is the one for
    the house with all the lighting, etc on it and looks like one 3" pipe
    connecting the 2 panels. I know the previous homeowner ran some pretty hefty
    equipment in the garage but I have no idea what. I know that I do not have
    any such equipment that operates at that voltage. The previous owner had
    this house built and I assume he musta went thru hell to get such voltage
    into this house.


    CooTer wrote:
    > I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    > about...
    > I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I
    > lost power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I
    > checked, none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power
    > was still not restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had
    > the compressor plugged in and all the wiring still appears new,
    > tough, like it was just installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in
    > other words, nothing was burnt or melted within the wall of the said
    > outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or at the breaker panel. I got
    > a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >
    > Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    > 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    > 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    > 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >
    > So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the two.
    > What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker but
    > would there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    > And info appreciated.
    > Thanks.
     
    CooTer, Feb 1, 2004
    #16
  17. Oldus Fartus

    docmill Guest

    Now your neutral is open. But I bet that compressor ran to beat Hell,
    before things went to shit.

    "CooTer" <> wrote in
    news:bvhtg0$suk2i$-berlin.de:

    > I found part of the problem. the 1st outlet on this circuit where the
    > main feed comes to the outlet and feeds the rest of the circuit I
    > found the *black* wire musta got hot and burnt to ground where it took
    > a chunk out of the ground wire and burnt the end of the black wire in
    > two. Naturally, I cut the bad parts of the ground and black wire off
    > and re connected with the same problem. Turns out, the wiring from the
    > 1st outlet to the last is fine. I jerry rigged an extension cord
    > (dangerous I know but without proper testing equipment, the hillbilly
    > way is best!) and stuck the wires that feed the rest of the circuit
    > into the plug in end of the cord, plugged the other end of the cord
    > into a working outlet and wah lah, it works. Now, I'm left with the
    > problem from the main feed wire feeding this circuit back to the box.
    > I got the multimeter and took some more measurements:
    >
    > Black wire to ground = 125VAC
    > White wire to ground = 0VAC
    > Black wire to white wire = 0VAC
    >
    > Black wire to white wire resistance = open (tested with breaker on and
    > off) Black wire to ground resistance (tested with breaker on and off)
    > = open-breaker off/jumpy-breaker on
    > White wire to ground resistance (tested with breaker on and off) =
    > open
    >
    > I have an electrician coming tomorrow to check into it. Hopefully the
    > wire is good and something happened in the box.
    >
    > In response to those who are wondering about the 440V incoming, I have
    > two boxes in the garage. one is a box, same size as the next with a
    > label that says "440VAC Disconnect main prior to servicing" and it has
    > 2 breakers, a main and one slightly smaller looking one. Right beside
    > it is the one for the house with all the lighting, etc on it and looks
    > like one 3" pipe connecting the 2 panels. I know the previous
    > homeowner ran some pretty hefty equipment in the garage but I have no
    > idea what. I know that I do not have any such equipment that operates
    > at that voltage. The previous owner had this house built and I assume
    > he musta went thru hell to get such voltage into this house.
    >
    >
    > CooTer wrote:
    >> I have some questions for any electricians that may be lurking
    >> about...
    >> I was using a small 3gal compressor (rated 15A) in my house when I
    >> lost power to 4 outlets. I immediately thoughtt it was a breaker so I
    >> checked, none tripped. I turned each one off and on again and power
    >> was still not restored. I pulled the outlet from the wall where I had
    >> the compressor plugged in and all the wiring still appears new,
    >> tough, like it was just installed (house is a mere 7 years old) in
    >> other words, nothing was burnt or melted within the wall of the said
    >> outlet nor did I smell anything nearby or at the breaker panel. I got
    >> a multimeter and took some measurements:
    >>
    >> Incoming is 440VAC from outside to panel rated 200amps
    >> 12.5 ohms between the black & white wires, no voltage.
    >> 125 VAC from the white wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >> 124.5 VAC from the black wire to ground, 60 Hz
    >>
    >> So the power is there on both wires but not connected between the
    >> two. What could the problem be? A friend suggested a faulty breaker
    >> but would there still be voltage on both wires to ground?
    >> And info appreciated.
    >> Thanks.

    >
    >
    >




    --
    +++++++++++ SEND ME A LINK +++++++++++
    docmill's Home Of HotLinks In The Frying SPAM
     
    docmill, Feb 1, 2004
    #17
  18. Oldus Fartus

    CooTer Guest

    Its runtime wasn't more than 5 minutes, plugged it in and it pumped the tank
    up about ¾'s of the way b4 i lost power. keep in mind its only a 3 gal.
    tank.

    docmill wrote:
    > Now your neutral is open. But I bet that compressor ran to beat Hell,
    > before things went to shit.
     
    CooTer, Feb 1, 2004
    #18
  19. Oldus Fartus

    docmill Guest

    I'm not laughing or making fun, I have dealt with what you have. I have 9
    breaker boxes in my house and 2 outlets in the shop that are wired as you
    describe, only they have 120 on both hot an neutral to grnd, and 220 to
    each other, a 30 amp breaker. So if you are on a 15 amp circut, then one
    of the outlets is awry. Or your neutral is hotwired in the box.
    Seen this happen before, but after all the equip. blew up, the guy said he
    checked the outlet with his shaver. He said it ran really fast. Well we
    put speakers on the roof and carried on. To bad about the band.




    "CooTer" <> wrote in
    news:bvhvdm$slefj$-berlin.de:

    > Its runtime wasn't more than 5 minutes, plugged it in and it pumped
    > the tank up about ¾'s of the way b4 i lost power. keep in mind its
    > only a 3 gal. tank.
    >
    > docmill wrote:
    >> Now your neutral is open. But I bet that compressor ran to beat
    >> Hell, before things went to shit.

    >
    >
    >




    --
    +++++++++++ SEND ME A LINK +++++++++++
    docmill's Home Of HotLinks In The Frying SPAM
     
    docmill, Feb 1, 2004
    #19
  20. Oldus Fartus

    CooTer Guest

    I understand, I wasn't trying to sound angry or anything just wanted to
    explain as best as possible what I did to cause this mess and what I've done
    to troubleshoot it. Also wanted to thank you for your info on this matter,
    its had me bonkers since it happened last night. wouldn't be so important if
    my security system didn't run on this circuit. I'll see what the electrician
    says tomorrow, thankfully its someone who works where I work so its gonna be
    a freebie :) . Thanks again.

    docmill wrote:
    > I'm not laughing or making fun, I have dealt with what you have. I
    > have 9 breaker boxes in my house and 2 outlets in the shop that are
    > wired as you describe, only they have 120 on both hot an neutral to
    > grnd, and 220 to each other, a 30 amp breaker. So if you are on a 15
    > amp circut, then one of the outlets is awry. Or your neutral is
    > hotwired in the box.
    > Seen this happen before, but after all the equip. blew up, the guy
    > said he checked the outlet with his shaver. He said it ran really
    > fast. Well we put speakers on the roof and carried on. To bad about
    > the band.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "CooTer" <> wrote in
    > news:bvhvdm$slefj$-berlin.de:
    >
    >> Its runtime wasn't more than 5 minutes, plugged it in and it pumped
    >> the tank up about ¾'s of the way b4 i lost power. keep in mind its
    >> only a 3 gal. tank.
    >>
    >> docmill wrote:
    >>> Now your neutral is open. But I bet that compressor ran to beat
    >>> Hell, before things went to shit.


    --
    By *Plonk*ing me,
    you hereby admit to my
    victory over your dispute.
    --
     
    CooTer, Feb 1, 2004
    #20
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