Effects of Parallax ??

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Drac, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Drac

    Drac Guest

    Hi,
    Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg landscapes
    at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and levelling base.
    Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).

    To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to remove
    the effects of parallax.

    Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?

    Cheers
    Mal
    Oz
    Drac, Feb 13, 2008
    #1
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  2. Drac

    Jeff R. Guest

    "Drac" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg
    > landscapes at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and
    > levelling base. Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to
    > remove the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?


    Absolutely definitely positively *not*.
    Are you stitching them together yourself, or using auto software?

    --
    Jeff R.
    Jeff R., Feb 13, 2008
    #2
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  3. Drac

    Guest

    Drac wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg landscapes
    > at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and levelling base.
    > Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to remove
    > the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?
    >
    > Cheers
    > Mal
    > Oz


    First up, there are cheap ways to create a nodal-point thingy if you
    really must have one - Rusty, where was that blog of yours again?

    Second, it really depends on the scene - do you have a lot of stuff in
    the foreground? And is the stuff *behind* the foreground objects,
    complex or detailed? That may add up to give you, and your software,
    hell..

    Having said that, in all but a very few panos I've done, software like
    PTGUI (+ Smartblend - I'm a recent convert!) has little trouble
    'compromising'. There have been a couple of notable examples where I
    now *wished* I had done the nodal thing, though.. Examples available
    on demand.

    I would suggest that if it is 'typical' landscapes, then you are
    probably not going to get into trouble often, so the answer to your
    question is "Probably, maybe not" ...
    , Feb 13, 2008
    #3
  4. Drac

    frederick Guest

    Drac wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg landscapes
    > at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and levelling base.
    > Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to remove
    > the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?
    >
    > Cheers
    > Mal
    > Oz
    >
    >

    Yes it can be - if you have close foreground objects and background
    objects in the frames, you may have problems stitching. If not using a
    pano head, then how close the foreground objects need to be to cause
    problems depends on lens f/l, and either how steady you can hand hold,
    or how far ahead of the tripod rotation point the lens entry pupil is.
    That said, many times you can get great results without worrying about a
    pano head.
    I made an L shaped bracket fairly simply, and have that mounted on an
    old pan and tilt head tripod with a level. Have mounted quick-release
    plates on it on both angles, so can easily change from portrait to
    landscape. If you can't be bothered making one, the Panosaurus (google
    for the website) looks good for the price - but not solid enough for
    long exposures.
    Calculating lens entry pupil accurately enough for panos is relatively
    simple. Note that entry pupil will shift as zoom lens focal length is
    adjusted. I just used two toothpicks lined up vertically at each end of
    a long table, adjusting distance on the bracket until there's no shift
    panning left to right. Works perfectly - marked the positions of the
    lenses I use on the bracket. Haven't bothered to use a pano head that
    rotates vertically around the entry pupil, as generally you'll have no
    foreground objects above the bottom row of a multi-row pano, so parallax
    isn't an issue. (I made a prototype that did this, but it was a bit
    cumbersome, and as I found, unnecessary for my needs.

    D70/80/200/300 cameras are pretty handy, as the gridlines in the
    viewfinder can be used to line up sufficient overlaps.
    frederick, Feb 13, 2008
    #4
  5. "Drac" <> wrote:
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?


    If there is stuff in the foreground, yes. For example if you are shooting
    with a very wide lens in a graveyard, and there are gravestones right up to
    the tripod, you'll want to swivel around the nodal point.

    If you are shooting the NY skyline from across the river with a telephoto,
    no.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Feb 13, 2008
    #5
  6. Drac

    bugbear Guest

    Drac wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg landscapes
    > at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and levelling base.
    > Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to remove
    > the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?


    Only when the subject is "close".

    BugBear
    bugbear, Feb 13, 2008
    #6
  7. bugbear wrote:
    > Drac wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >> Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg
    >> landscapes at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod
    >> and levelling base. Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus
    >> far). To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper
    >> pano-head
    >> is required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod
    >> axis to remove the effects of parallax.
    >>
    >> Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to
    >> the expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?

    >
    > Only when the subject is "close".
    >
    > BugBear


    ... and even then, some software has an optiob to remove the "ghosts" which
    can occur.

    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 13, 2008
    #7
  8. Drac

    Scott W Guest

    On Feb 12, 9:55 pm, "Drac" <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg landscapes
    > at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and levelling base..
    > Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to remove
    > the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?


    For most landscape photos a pano head is not really needed. Shooting
    in cases where objects are close, like inside rooms, become hard with
    out one.You will know when you need one by whether you images stitch
    together well or not.

    Beyond rotating around the nodal point some pano-head will do
    indexing, which can make life easier, particularly when you get in to
    doing more then on raw, say a 5 x 10 pano.

    I shot panos for many years without a pano head, but it got a lot
    easier when I got a pano head.

    Scott
    Scott W, Feb 13, 2008
    #8
  9. Drac

    bugbear Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > bugbear wrote:
    >>
    >> BugBear

    >
    > .. and even then, some software has an optiob to remove the "ghosts" which
    > can occur.
    >
    > David


    I think "remove" is overstating the case; ameliorate, perhaps?

    BugBear
    bugbear, Feb 13, 2008
    #9
  10. bugbear wrote:
    > David J Taylor wrote:
    >> bugbear wrote:
    >>>
    >>> BugBear

    >>
    >> .. and even then, some software has an option to remove the "ghosts"
    >> which can occur.
    >>
    >> David

    >
    > I think "remove" is overstating the case; ameliorate, perhaps?
    >
    > BugBear


    Indeed - I'd accept "reduce". In practice, AutoPano Pro works well.

    Cheers,
    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 13, 2008
    #10
  11. Drac

    bugbear Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > bugbear wrote:
    >> David J Taylor wrote:
    >>> bugbear wrote:
    >>>> BugBear
    >>> .. and even then, some software has an option to remove the "ghosts"
    >>> which can occur.
    >>>
    >>> David

    >> I think "remove" is overstating the case; ameliorate, perhaps?
    >>
    >> BugBear

    >
    > Indeed - I'd accept "reduce". In practice, AutoPano Pro works well.


    I use Hugin and Enblend. I normally use a pano head
    if there is foreground material, so I don't see
    parallax issues.

    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/workshop.jpg

    However, I did do a panorama of a seafront (from the end
    of the pier!) and Enblend did a remarkable job
    of merging/fudging/hiding the various waves
    and water levels that inevitably varied between
    the shots.

    BugBear
    bugbear, Feb 13, 2008
    #11
  12. Drac

    bugbear Guest

    bugbear, Feb 13, 2008
    #12
  13. Drac

    ray Guest

    On Wed, 13 Feb 2008 16:55:42 +0900, Drac wrote:

    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg
    > landscapes at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and
    > levelling base. Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to
    > remove the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?


    Generally, no.


    >
    > Cheers
    > Mal
    > Oz
    ray, Feb 13, 2008
    #13
  14. On Wed, 13 Feb 2008 18:38:25 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:

    > For example if you are shooting
    > with a very wide lens in a graveyard, and there are gravestones right up to
    > the tripod, you'll want to swivel around the nodal point.


    I dont e v e n want to know why you know this. :)
    Allodoxaphobia, Feb 13, 2008
    #14
  15. Drac

    Drac Guest

    "Drac" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > Just getting into some simple single-plane pano's - mostly 180deg
    > landscapes at the moment. Currently using a D80 on top of a tripod and
    > levelling base. Getting some results that I'm happy with (thus far).
    >
    > To do this right of course I've been advised that a proper pano-head is
    > required to shift the nodal point of the lens over the tripod axis to
    > remove the effects of parallax.
    >
    > Is the effect of parallax that much of an issue (visually) to go to the
    > expense of acquiring the additional hardware ?
    >
    > Cheers
    > Mal
    > Oz

    Wow - that's evoked some responses !!! Very much appreciate all of them.
    You all seem to confirm what I had surmised and read - parallax is not t h
    a t much of an issue when the landscape is kms away - which is what I'm
    doing at the moment.

    I did do a couple of indoor pano's within a large computer room with kit at
    different distances - this gave Autostitch a bit of challenge - so from what
    I am reading here the pano-head should/would be some advantage here.

    Once again, many thanks - very helpful.

    Cheers
    Mal
    Oz
    Drac, Feb 13, 2008
    #15
  16. "Allodoxaphobia" <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 13 Feb 2008 18:38:25 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >
    >> For example if you are shooting
    >> with a very wide lens in a graveyard, and there are gravestones right up
    >> to
    >> the tripod, you'll want to swivel around the nodal point.

    >
    > I dont e v e n want to know why you know this. :)


    You lose<g>.

    It turns out that in Tokyo, most of the things that look even vaguely
    oriental are Buddhist temples, and the Buddhists here have a near total
    monopoly on funerals.

    So if one looks for things Japanese around here, you end up photographing
    the cemeteries associated with Buddhist temples.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Feb 14, 2008
    #16
  17. Drac

    bugbear Guest

    Drac wrote:
    >> Oz

    > Wow - that's evoked some responses !!! Very much appreciate all of them.
    > You all seem to confirm what I had surmised and read - parallax is not t h
    > a t much of an issue when the landscape is kms away - which is what I'm
    > doing at the moment.


    Heh. You don't even *need* a tripod under those circumstances, as long
    as your half-careful to keep the horizon in the same place
    across the sequence.

    BugBear
    bugbear, Feb 14, 2008
    #17
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