EF lens reverser

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Paul Dalen, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. Paul Dalen

    Paul Dalen Guest

    Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    purpose)?
    Paul Dalen, Jan 29, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Paul Dalen

    . Guest

    "Paul Dalen" <> wrote in message
    news:aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03...
    > Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > purpose)?
    >
    >

    Yes it is, but there are better ways to get macro results with said Canon
    cameras. I guess given the correct adapter you could even mount it backwards
    accidently.
    ., Jan 29, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Paul Dalen

    PhotoMan Guest

    "Paul Dalen" <> wrote in message
    news:aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03...
    > Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > purpose)


    HP Photo in New York has the reversing adapters. Note: you will have no AF
    or aperture control.
    Joe Arnold
    PhotoMan, Jan 29, 2004
    #3
  4. Paul Dalen

    Nils Rostedt Guest

    "Paul Dalen" wrote
    > Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > purpose)?
    >


    Yes, but if you want the electrical interface to work for stopping down the
    aperture you need an adapter like the one Novoflex makes :
    http://www.novoflex.de/english/html/macro_accessories.htm

    It would probably be feasible for the average do-it-yourself guy to make
    such an adapter from an EF extension ring cut in two pieces, and a filter
    adapter ring glued to the piece that mounts on the body. I wonder if anyone
    has made such an accessory?

    /N
    Nils Rostedt, Jan 29, 2004
    #4
  5. Paul Dalen

    John Bean Guest

    On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 14:49:16 -0600, Paul Dalen wrote:

    > Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > purpose)?


    Yes. Novoflex do an EF lens reversal adaptor which retains auto operation.
    It's not cheap.

    --
    John Bean

    I don't read books, but I have friends who do (George W. Bush)
    John Bean, Jan 29, 2004
    #5
  6. Paul Dalen

    dslr Guest

    Paul Dalen wrote:
    >
    > Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > purpose)?


    Yes, you need a reversing adapter - one such (may be the only one, my UK
    dealer's catalogue claims it's unique) is made by Novoflex and comprises
    one adapter that fits on the front of the camera (to which the front of
    the lens is screwed) and a second fitted to the back of the lens (which
    is now at the ront) to provide the EF connections. The two parts are
    cable linked.
    In the UK it retails for around £190, so it's probably around $200-250.
    Novoflex product page is at;
    http://www.novoflex.de/english/html/products.htm

    --
    regards,
    dslr
    dslr, Jan 29, 2004
    #6
  7. Paul Dalen

    Randy Rhine Guest

    Does reversing give more magnification than using extension tubes? I
    suppose it depends on the lense combination. probably some formula to
    determine the magnification factor. But, with extension tubes, you get
    AF and aperture control. I have the Kenko ext tubes...and they get me as
    close as I've wanted so far

    rr



    PhotoMan wrote:
    > "Paul Dalen" <> wrote in message
    > news:aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03...
    >
    >>Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    >>purpose)

    >
    >
    > HP Photo in New York has the reversing adapters. Note: you will have no AF
    > or aperture control.
    > Joe Arnold
    >
    >
    Randy Rhine, Jan 29, 2004
    #7
  8. Paul Dalen

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03>,
    "Paul Dalen" <> wrote:

    > Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > purpose)?
    >
    >


    Novoflex makes the EOS RETRO reversing adapter for the Canon EOS series.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
    Bob Salomon, Jan 29, 2004
    #8
  9. Paul Dalen

    Nils Rostedt Guest

    Yes. The 50/1.8 when reversed, covers about 35mm horizontally, or
    approximately the same as when mounted on a 36mm extension ring. As an
    additional benefit, the lens-to-subject distance is larger. And extension
    rings can of course still be used for more magnification.
    /N


    "Randy Rhine" <> wrote in message
    news:aKeSb.139392$sv6.755735@attbi_s52...
    > Does reversing give more magnification than using extension tubes? I
    > suppose it depends on the lense combination. probably some formula to
    > determine the magnification factor. But, with extension tubes, you get
    > AF and aperture control. I have the Kenko ext tubes...and they get me as
    > close as I've wanted so far
    >
    > rr
    >
    >
    >
    > PhotoMan wrote:
    > > "Paul Dalen" <> wrote in message
    > > news:aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03...
    > >
    > >>Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards

    (on
    > >>purpose)

    > >
    > >
    > > HP Photo in New York has the reversing adapters. Note: you will have no

    AF
    > > or aperture control.
    > > Joe Arnold
    > >
    > >

    >
    Nils Rostedt, Jan 29, 2004
    #9
  10. Paul Dalen

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <bvbtpd$qksje$-berlin.de>,
    "Nils Rostedt" <> wrote:

    > Yes. The 50/1.8 when reversed, covers about 35mm horizontally, or
    > approximately the same as when mounted on a 36mm extension ring. As an
    > additional benefit, the lens-to-subject distance is larger. And extension
    > rings can of course still be used for more magnification.
    > /N
    >
    >
    > "Randy Rhine" <> wrote in message
    > news:aKeSb.139392$sv6.755735@attbi_s52...
    > > Does reversing give more magnification than using extension tubes? I
    > > suppose it depends on the lense combination. probably some formula to
    > > determine the magnification factor. But, with extension tubes, you get
    > > AF and aperture control. I have the Kenko ext tubes...and they get me as
    > > close as I've wanted so far
    > >
    > > rr
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > PhotoMan wrote:
    > > > "Paul Dalen" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03...
    > > >
    > > >>Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards

    > (on
    > > >>purpose)
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > HP Photo in New York has the reversing adapters. Note: you will have no

    > AF
    > > > or aperture control.
    > > > Joe Arnold
    > > >
    > > >

    > >

    >


    So can a bellows. And that allows even greater mag.

    --
    To reply no_ HPMarketing Corp.
    Bob Salomon, Jan 29, 2004
    #10
  11. Paul Dalen

    Jeff Guest

    Randy Rhine <> wrote in
    news:aKeSb.139392$sv6.755735@attbi_s52:

    > Does reversing give more magnification than using extension tubes? I
    > suppose it depends on the lense combination. probably some formula to
    > determine the magnification factor. But, with extension tubes, you
    > get AF and aperture control. I have the Kenko ext tubes...and they get
    > me as close as I've wanted so far
    >
    > rr
    >
    >
    >
    > PhotoMan wrote:
    >> "Paul Dalen" <> wrote in message
    >> news:aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03...
    >>
    >>>Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it
    >>>backwards (on purpose)

    >>
    >>
    >> HP Photo in New York has the reversing adapters. Note: you will have
    >> no AF or aperture control.
    >> Joe Arnold
    >>
    >>

    >


    As I understand it, the reason some lenses are used reversed is because
    they are designed so the focused plane (the film) at the back of the
    lens is closer than objects at the front. After reversing, your subject
    is then closer to the lens while the film is farther since you use a
    bellows or tubes. However, results will vary depending on the
    particular lens you use.
    I have tried one that was able to focus reversed but had a lot of field
    curvature so the edges looked bad. Another I tried was not able to
    focus at all when reversed. The best results I've gotten were from a
    regularly mounted 100mm macro lens. The 1:1 ratio I get from it is more
    than enough for my uses, but tubes could be used to get closer if
    needed.

    Jeff
    Jeff, Feb 5, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03>, Paul Dalen wrote:
    >Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    >purpose)?


    Forgive my newbie-like question, but why would you want to do this?

    - awh
    Drew Hamilton, Feb 6, 2004
    #12
  13. On Fri, 6 Feb 2004 09:25:52 -0500, (Drew Hamilton) wrote:

    >In article <aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03>, Paul Dalen wrote:
    >>Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    >>purpose)?

    >
    >Forgive my newbie-like question, but why would you want to do this?
    >
    > - awh


    If you reverse a Wide angle you get a makro. My 24 mm Nikkor, reversed
    makes 8 x 12 mm a full frame (24 x 36 mm).

    You have to do it manually though.

    /Daniel L.
    Daniel Lindström, Feb 7, 2004
    #13
  14. Drew,

    the typical photographic lens is optimized for imaging far away objects onto a
    near-by sensor (film). 'Optimised' refers to correcting abberations of light
    tracing through the lens, mainly diminishing geometric and colour 'errors'.
    This correction is sensitive to the distance of the object to the lens.

    Obviously 'macro' shots don't fit the bill of this optimisation because in a
    macro shot situation the object is positioned near to the lens and the distance
    between sensor (film) and lens has to be quite large. When doing macro shots
    the geometry of the imaging process is -so to speak- inversed with regard to
    the design specifications of the lens. You might either buy a 'macro' lens or
    place your lens inverted ('backwards') into the path of the light. The latter
    was done routinely in earlier times when people used extension tubes for macro
    shots.

    When you are interested in these things I would urge you to buy some old
    equipment, ideally a wooden camera of ancient times with a focusing screen, or
    next to this ideal an old SLR with 'extension rings' for macro photography.
    Equipment of this type can be bought very cheaply and it needn't be of high
    quality for the purpose of gaining some first hand experience with optics. in
    addition, a simple introductory text book on optics would be helpful, as well.

    Unfortunately, the modern zoom lens design is incorporating some devilish
    tricks that completly mask the very simple underlying physical priciples of
    optics. You cant't get meaningful insights into optics from naive observation
    anymore from this newfangled stuff.

    Guenter



    Drew Hamilton wrote:

    > In article <aleSb.10161$Q_4.7172@okepread03>, Paul Dalen wrote:
    > >Is it possible to reverse an EF lens? I mean, to install it backwards (on
    > >purpose)?

    >
    > Forgive my newbie-like question, but why would you want to do this?
    >
    > - awh
    Guenter Fieblinger, Feb 7, 2004
    #14
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Beowulf
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    2,952
    Lionel
    Aug 24, 2003
  2. Mike Kozlowski
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    786
  3. Amyotte
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    706
    amyotte
    Feb 11, 2004
  4. SteveJ

    Canon 10D lens Nikon Lens

    SteveJ, Jun 9, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    29
    Views:
    839
    Steve m...
    Jun 14, 2004
  5. silvio

    DIGITAL LENS VS REGULAR LENS

    silvio, Jun 16, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    557
    David Dyer-Bennet
    Jun 16, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page