eBay - The place to find great bargains on Kodak 14n cameras....but

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Nikki, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. Nikki

    Nikki Guest

    Too bad half the ads are from scumbags. Check these out, paying
    attention to the seller's feedback in each case:

    "cobergman"
    eBay #2957376212

    "zelovia"
    eBay #2957133851

    "mybookroom"
    eBay #2957472080

    "dstuart42"
    eBay #2957364905, #2957365094, #2957365436

    "sacredfiredraconian"
    eBay #2957465571

    eBay is evidently too busy raking in money from seller fees to worry
    about these fraud artists. I've noticed that no sooner are their ads
    killed but twice as many take their place. All of the above users
    except for the last is undoubtedly an innocent victim of identity
    theft, but according to eBay policy it's essentially impossible for
    those seeing these ads to inform the individuals that their ID's are
    being used to commit fraud.

    You may figure that if there are 7 frauds for 14n cameras alone (and
    that's just today), that there must be thousands of these throughout
    the photo and electronic sections of eBay. Clearly it's a time to be
    verrrry careful when considering camera purchases or purchase of any
    big-ticket items on eBay.

    If you want to have some fun, try bidding small amounts on these, or
    contact the sellers, asking for payment instructions and references.
    A couple days ago some hero bid $122,000 for one of these 14n cameras,
    just to kill the ad...knowing full well the seller had no intention to
    deliver. The scumballs are often now resorting to hidden bids and
    "preselected bidders," methods by which those wishing to warn bidders
    about fraud are thwarted. Thanks eBay for your wisdom and
    consideration. Thanks a bunch.
     
    Nikki, Oct 13, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Nikki

    Not Very Guest

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 05:15:45 GMT, Nikki <> wrote:

    > about fraud are thwarted. Thanks eBay for your wisdom and
    > consideration. Thanks a bunch.


    eBay has had its day. It is no longer useable.
     
    Not Very, Oct 13, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Nikki

    Bowser- Guest

    Actually, you do make a point that spotting fraud in auctions is easy, and
    that e-bay has provided enough tools to allow you to protect yourself. There
    are millions of items for auction on that site, and we can't expect the
    managers to find each and every shady auction.

    Caveat Emptor.

    "Nikki" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Too bad half the ads are from scumbags. Check these out, paying
    > attention to the seller's feedback in each case:
    >
    > "cobergman"
    > eBay #2957376212
    >
    > "zelovia"
    > eBay #2957133851
    >
    > "mybookroom"
    > eBay #2957472080
    >
    > "dstuart42"
    > eBay #2957364905, #2957365094, #2957365436
    >
    > "sacredfiredraconian"
    > eBay #2957465571
    >
    > eBay is evidently too busy raking in money from seller fees to worry
    > about these fraud artists. I've noticed that no sooner are their ads
    > killed but twice as many take their place. All of the above users
    > except for the last is undoubtedly an innocent victim of identity
    > theft, but according to eBay policy it's essentially impossible for
    > those seeing these ads to inform the individuals that their ID's are
    > being used to commit fraud.
    >
    > You may figure that if there are 7 frauds for 14n cameras alone (and
    > that's just today), that there must be thousands of these throughout
    > the photo and electronic sections of eBay. Clearly it's a time to be
    > verrrry careful when considering camera purchases or purchase of any
    > big-ticket items on eBay.
    >
    > If you want to have some fun, try bidding small amounts on these, or
    > contact the sellers, asking for payment instructions and references.
    > A couple days ago some hero bid $122,000 for one of these 14n cameras,
    > just to kill the ad...knowing full well the seller had no intention to
    > deliver. The scumballs are often now resorting to hidden bids and
    > "preselected bidders," methods by which those wishing to warn bidders
    > about fraud are thwarted. Thanks eBay for your wisdom and
    > consideration. Thanks a bunch.
     
    Bowser-, Oct 13, 2003
    #3
  4. Nikki

    Brothermark Guest

    ....
    > Actually, you do make a point that spotting fraud in auctions is easy, and
    > that e-bay has provided enough tools to allow you to protect yourself.


    There should be a "report fraudulent auction" link and then ebay could pay 5
    monkeys to act fast on suspicious items.

    Its too hard to report frauds
     
    Brothermark, Oct 13, 2003
    #4
  5. Nikki

    Jan Wagner Guest

    Brothermark wrote:
    > ...
    >> Actually, you do make a point that spotting fraud in auctions is
    >> easy, and that e-bay has provided enough tools to allow you to
    >> protect yourself.

    >
    > There should be a "report fraudulent auction" link and then ebay
    > could pay 5 monkeys to act fast on suspicious items.
    >
    > Its too hard to report frauds


    Not hard:
    http://pages.ebay.com/help/contact_inline/report_listing.html

    And at least eBay.de is fast at taking action, just a matter of a few
    hours. Don't know about eBay.com, they probably have much more work to
    do (=a larger area of the world to service)

    Though i agree, a link to the form should be included on every item's
    page...

    - jfw
     
    Jan Wagner, Oct 13, 2003
    #5
  6. Nikki

    Nikki Guest

    Well, if it's so damned easy to spot these slimeballs, why doesn't
    eBay take a more proactive role in getting rid of them? I don't think
    it's fair to buyers to have to go through a number of expensive
    learning experiences, but maybe I'm wrong. I've reported loads of
    these and in each case they are eventually pulled off, but there needs
    to be some involvement of law enforcement to set these bozos up and
    get them put away. Just cancelling their ads isn't much satisfaction.

    Here are a few more if you're interested in seeing the daily scumbag
    list: 2957442137, 2957447716, 2957290686, 2957457966. The last is
    funny, since the "seller" has never before dealed in anything but
    casino chips and matchbook covers. How about this one for a D100:
    2957112529. Unfortunately it has several bidders--clearly they should
    be warned, since this "seller" hasn't sold or bought anything but
    lady's dresses and shoes. Note that in all these auctions the phoney
    seller does not accept PayPal or credit card payment, and in several
    cases expects to give "pre-approval" to bidders. I think it's a bad
    mistake for eBay to allow this, since it effectively hides bidders and
    prevents whistle blowers (like me) from warning them.

    Over the past few years I've purchased loads of Nikon equipment using
    eBay with overall great results, but now things have changed
    dramatically. When looking the ads over for 14n, D100, D1X etc.,
    there are times when almost every other ad is a fraud! When this
    slime figures out how to manipulate the system a bit better than they
    do now, it will be difficult even for seasoned buyers to discriminate
    fraud from legitimate sellers. I don't know about you, but I'd like
    to see eBay healthy again, and a forum for honest transactions. If
    it's to be a place where we're willing to buy again, it's up to all of
    us to be vigilantes, rant, rave etc....

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 08:38:45 -0400, "Bowser-" <> wrote:

    >Actually, you do make a point that spotting fraud in auctions is easy, and
    >that e-bay has provided enough tools to allow you to protect yourself. There
    >are millions of items for auction on that site, and we can't expect the
    >managers to find each and every shady auction.
    >
    >Caveat Emptor.
    >
    >"Nikki" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Too bad half the ads are from scumbags. Check these out, paying
    >> attention to the seller's feedback in each case:
    >>
    >> "cobergman"
    >> eBay #2957376212
    >>
    >> "zelovia"
    >> eBay #2957133851
    >>
    >> "mybookroom"
    >> eBay #2957472080
    >>
    >> "dstuart42"
    >> eBay #2957364905, #2957365094, #2957365436
    >>
    >> "sacredfiredraconian"
    >> eBay #2957465571
    >>
    >> eBay is evidently too busy raking in money from seller fees to worry
    >> about these fraud artists. I've noticed that no sooner are their ads
    >> killed but twice as many take their place. All of the above users
    >> except for the last is undoubtedly an innocent victim of identity
    >> theft, but according to eBay policy it's essentially impossible for
    >> those seeing these ads to inform the individuals that their ID's are
    >> being used to commit fraud.
    >>
    >> You may figure that if there are 7 frauds for 14n cameras alone (and
    >> that's just today), that there must be thousands of these throughout
    >> the photo and electronic sections of eBay. Clearly it's a time to be
    >> verrrry careful when considering camera purchases or purchase of any
    >> big-ticket items on eBay.
    >>
    >> If you want to have some fun, try bidding small amounts on these, or
    >> contact the sellers, asking for payment instructions and references.
    >> A couple days ago some hero bid $122,000 for one of these 14n cameras,
    >> just to kill the ad...knowing full well the seller had no intention to
    >> deliver. The scumballs are often now resorting to hidden bids and
    >> "preselected bidders," methods by which those wishing to warn bidders
    >> about fraud are thwarted. Thanks eBay for your wisdom and
    >> consideration. Thanks a bunch.

    >
     
    Nikki, Oct 13, 2003
    #6
  7. Nikki

    nuttin Guest

    "Nikki" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, if it's so damned easy to spot these slimeballs, why doesn't
    > eBay take a more proactive role in getting rid of them?

    (snipped)
    Because eBay is really for SELLERS!!!! without them eBay has no business.
    If sellers disappear, then buyers disappear. If buyers buy something bad,
    they think it's just that seller, and they keep on buying. eBay protects
    the seller, rarely the buyer....my experience, anyway.
     
    nuttin, Oct 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Nikki

    Nikki Guest

    Of course you're right, but last time I checked, it takes both seller
    and buyer to make a transaction, and eBay has no business without the
    satisfaction of both. eBay's shortsightedness in allowing
    "pre-approved bidders" and the like is going to cause serious
    purchasers to shy away. Here's yet another fraud to make the point:

    #2957376080 D100 (shopofox)

    Too bad "shopofox" doesn't know how his ID is being used...anyone care
    to tell him?


    On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 18:09:48 GMT, "nuttin" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Nikki" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Well, if it's so damned easy to spot these slimeballs, why doesn't
    >> eBay take a more proactive role in getting rid of them?

    >(snipped)
    >Because eBay is really for SELLERS!!!! without them eBay has no business.
    >If sellers disappear, then buyers disappear. If buyers buy something bad,
    >they think it's just that seller, and they keep on buying. eBay protects
    >the seller, rarely the buyer....my experience, anyway.
    >
     
    Nikki, Oct 13, 2003
    #8
  9. Nikki

    Bowser- Guest

    E-Bay can't spot every auction fraud, and simply cannot hire enough people
    to review each and every auction! This is a simple issue, really. If you are
    not comfortable with the site, don't use it. But for a site that lists
    millions of items, the percentage of fraud seems to be low. (gut feeling)

    "Nikki" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, if it's so damned easy to spot these slimeballs, why doesn't
    > eBay take a more proactive role in getting rid of them? I don't think
    > it's fair to buyers to have to go through a number of expensive
    > learning experiences, but maybe I'm wrong. I've reported loads of
    > these and in each case they are eventually pulled off, but there needs
    > to be some involvement of law enforcement to set these bozos up and
    > get them put away. Just cancelling their ads isn't much satisfaction.
    >
    > Here are a few more if you're interested in seeing the daily scumbag
    > list: 2957442137, 2957447716, 2957290686, 2957457966. The last is
    > funny, since the "seller" has never before dealed in anything but
    > casino chips and matchbook covers. How about this one for a D100:
    > 2957112529. Unfortunately it has several bidders--clearly they should
    > be warned, since this "seller" hasn't sold or bought anything but
    > lady's dresses and shoes. Note that in all these auctions the phoney
    > seller does not accept PayPal or credit card payment, and in several
    > cases expects to give "pre-approval" to bidders. I think it's a bad
    > mistake for eBay to allow this, since it effectively hides bidders and
    > prevents whistle blowers (like me) from warning them.
    >
    > Over the past few years I've purchased loads of Nikon equipment using
    > eBay with overall great results, but now things have changed
    > dramatically. When looking the ads over for 14n, D100, D1X etc.,
    > there are times when almost every other ad is a fraud! When this
    > slime figures out how to manipulate the system a bit better than they
    > do now, it will be difficult even for seasoned buyers to discriminate
    > fraud from legitimate sellers. I don't know about you, but I'd like
    > to see eBay healthy again, and a forum for honest transactions. If
    > it's to be a place where we're willing to buy again, it's up to all of
    > us to be vigilantes, rant, rave etc....
    >
    > On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 08:38:45 -0400, "Bowser-" <> wrote:
    >
    > >Actually, you do make a point that spotting fraud in auctions is easy,

    and
    > >that e-bay has provided enough tools to allow you to protect yourself.

    There
    > >are millions of items for auction on that site, and we can't expect the
    > >managers to find each and every shady auction.
    > >
    > >Caveat Emptor.
    > >
    > >"Nikki" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >> Too bad half the ads are from scumbags. Check these out, paying
    > >> attention to the seller's feedback in each case:
    > >>
    > >> "cobergman"
    > >> eBay #2957376212
    > >>
    > >> "zelovia"
    > >> eBay #2957133851
    > >>
    > >> "mybookroom"
    > >> eBay #2957472080
    > >>
    > >> "dstuart42"
    > >> eBay #2957364905, #2957365094, #2957365436
    > >>
    > >> "sacredfiredraconian"
    > >> eBay #2957465571
    > >>
    > >> eBay is evidently too busy raking in money from seller fees to worry
    > >> about these fraud artists. I've noticed that no sooner are their ads
    > >> killed but twice as many take their place. All of the above users
    > >> except for the last is undoubtedly an innocent victim of identity
    > >> theft, but according to eBay policy it's essentially impossible for
    > >> those seeing these ads to inform the individuals that their ID's are
    > >> being used to commit fraud.
    > >>
    > >> You may figure that if there are 7 frauds for 14n cameras alone (and
    > >> that's just today), that there must be thousands of these throughout
    > >> the photo and electronic sections of eBay. Clearly it's a time to be
    > >> verrrry careful when considering camera purchases or purchase of any
    > >> big-ticket items on eBay.
    > >>
    > >> If you want to have some fun, try bidding small amounts on these, or
    > >> contact the sellers, asking for payment instructions and references.
    > >> A couple days ago some hero bid $122,000 for one of these 14n cameras,
    > >> just to kill the ad...knowing full well the seller had no intention to
    > >> deliver. The scumballs are often now resorting to hidden bids and
    > >> "preselected bidders," methods by which those wishing to warn bidders
    > >> about fraud are thwarted. Thanks eBay for your wisdom and
    > >> consideration. Thanks a bunch.

    > >

    >
     
    Bowser-, Oct 13, 2003
    #9
  10. Nikki

    Bob Niland Guest

    > ... and in several cases expects to give
    > "pre-approval" to bidders.


    That makes it easy.
    * Approved Bidder Auction: I don't bid.
    * Private Auction: I don't bid.
    * (Private) Feedback: I don't bid.

    But unless the auc looks like an obvious
    fraud, I do "ask the seller a question"
    and close by pointing out that unless they
    revise to open auction / or un-Private their
    FB, I won't be bidding.

    But nonetheless, eBay is NOT doing enough
    to combat frauds, most of which are using
    hijacked eBay accounts.

    They could very easily prevent hijacks by
    applying a "secret question" dialog for any changes to accounts (email address,
    phone, address of record). Instead, they
    sure make it look like their agenda lies
    elsewhere.

    --
    Regards, PO Box 248
    Bob Niland Enterprise
    mailto: Kansas USA
    which, due to spam, is: 67441-0248
    email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn

    Unless otherwise specifically stated, expressing
    personal opinions and NOT speaking for any
    employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    Bob Niland, Oct 13, 2003
    #10
  11. Nikki

    George Kerby Guest

    Re: eBay - The place to find great bargains on Kodak 14ncameras....but

    On 10/13/03 4:32 PM, in article , "Bob
    Niland" <> wrote:

    >> ... and in several cases expects to give
    >> "pre-approval" to bidders.

    >
    > That makes it easy.
    > * Approved Bidder Auction: I don't bid.
    > * Private Auction: I don't bid.


    You bring up an interesting observation. As an aside, I once won an article
    on a "private" E-bay auction. The only people that supposedly knew who the
    winner was was the seller an the winner of the auction. A month later I got
    an e-mail (using my E-bay nickname) from another party wondering how I liked
    the product and would I recommend it to the sender. The sender WAS NOT the
    seller. I checked. I sent E-bay an inquiry - and got no response - as to why
    a "private" auction was not so private.


    _______________________________________________________________________________
    Posted Via Uncensored-News.Com - Accounts Starting At $6.95 - http://www.uncensored-news.com
    <><><><><><><> The Worlds Uncensored News Source <><><><><><><><>
     
    George Kerby, Oct 13, 2003
    #11
  12. Nikki

    Bob Niland Guest

    This is getting a bit afield of rec.photo.digital,
    so I'm going to cross-post it to
    alt.marketing.online.ebay
    where it may get more insightful answers.

    > George Kerby <> wrote:


    >> That makes it easy.
    >> * Approved Bidder Auction: I don't bid.
    >> * Private Auction: I don't bid.
    >> * (Private) Feedback: I don't bid.

    >
    > ... I once won an article on a "private" E-bay
    > auction. ... A month later I got an e-mail
    > (using my E-bay nickname) from another party
    > wondering how I liked the product and would I
    > recommend it to the sender. The sender WAS NOT
    > the seller. I checked. I sent E-bay an inquiry
    > - and got no response - as to why a "private"
    > auction was not so private.


    Never having won or even bid on a PA, I don't
    know, but I'm always willing to guess...

    Did you leave Feedback for the seller? Did they
    leave FB for you? If so, that may not be so
    private, and either copy has the auction link
    in it. Not trivial to make such connections,
    but far from impossible.

    --
    Regards, PO Box 248
    Bob Niland Enterprise
    mailto: Kansas USA
    which, due to spam, is: 67441-0248
    email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn

    Unless otherwise specifically stated, expressing
    personal opinions and NOT speaking for any
    employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    Bob Niland, Oct 13, 2003
    #12
  13. Nikki

    George Kerby Guest

    Re: eBay - The place to find great bargains on Kodak 14ncameras....but

    On 10/13/03 5:51 PM, in article , "Bob
    Niland" <> wrote:


    >
    > Did you leave Feedback for the seller? Did they
    > leave FB for you? If so, that may not be so
    > private, and either copy has the auction link
    > in it. Not trivial to make such connections,
    > but far from impossible.


    We both left positive feedback for each other. But under 'item number', it
    was not given - just said "private". This seller is quite active: 9 - 12
    feed backs a week, half of which are private. All sorts of things as
    well-not just a line or two of products. Beats me!


    _______________________________________________________________________________
    Posted Via Uncensored-News.Com - Accounts Starting At $6.95 - http://www.uncensored-news.com
    <><><><><><><> The Worlds Uncensored News Source <><><><><><><><>
     
    George Kerby, Oct 14, 2003
    #13
  14. Nikki

    Nikki Guest

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 21:16:35 GMT, "Bowser-" <> wrote:

    >E-Bay can't spot every auction fraud, and simply cannot hire enough people
    >to review each and every auction! This is a simple issue, really. If you are
    >not comfortable with the site, don't use it. But for a site that lists
    >millions of items, the percentage of fraud seems to be low. (gut feeling)
    >

    Yes, maybe they can't spot EVERY auction fraud, but they need to do a
    whole lot better. If I can sit here and find over a dozen absolute
    frauds in the camera section within 40 minutes, why can't those who
    profit from this enterprise be willing to do the same? I report
    these bastards to eBay and the ads are yanked, only to pop up again
    the next day with another pirated user ID.

    I found one "seller" tonight that (according to his feedback) deals in
    collectible books, and is a buyer about 98% of the time. Suddenly he
    must be taking an interest in being a big-time Canon and Nikon dealer,
    with 5 new cameras offered. Hiding behind eBay's "private
    bidding/purchasing" option and expecting payment only in the form of
    cashier's checks and money orders, he states that there's "no
    insurance available." That's certainly an understatement.

    After finding another swindler, I discovered that it wasn't just Kodak
    14ns he was offering, but big-screen LCD sets, laptop computers and
    other expensive items. Sadly, there were a number of bidders for some
    of these auctions. I blew the whistle on him of course, but he'll be
    back again tomorrow with a different ID.

    Some are clearly using shills to jack up their bid and create the
    illusion of buying interest. What's even more interesting is to see
    these shills (with the same ID) bidding up other similar frauds.

    Just for fun, how many probable fraud auctions in the camera section
    of eBay can you find in an hour? It's not hard.
     
    Nikki, Oct 14, 2003
    #14
  15. Nikki

    DS Guest

    Same people who allow their accounts to be hi-jacked by responding to those
    "official" looking emails requesting all manner of personal ebay info would
    just as blindly type in the "secret" question along with the answer.

    DS

    "Bob Niland" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > > ... and in several cases expects to give
    > > "pre-approval" to bidders.

    >
    > That makes it easy.
    > * Approved Bidder Auction: I don't bid.
    > * Private Auction: I don't bid.
    > * (Private) Feedback: I don't bid.
    >
    > But unless the auc looks like an obvious
    > fraud, I do "ask the seller a question"
    > and close by pointing out that unless they
    > revise to open auction / or un-Private their
    > FB, I won't be bidding.
    >
    > But nonetheless, eBay is NOT doing enough
    > to combat frauds, most of which are using
    > hijacked eBay accounts.
    >
    > They could very easily prevent hijacks by
    > applying a "secret question" dialog for any changes to accounts (email

    address,
    > phone, address of record). Instead, they
    > sure make it look like their agenda lies
    > elsewhere.
    >
    > --
    > Regards, PO Box 248
    > Bob Niland Enterprise
    > mailto: Kansas USA
    > which, due to spam, is: 67441-0248
    > email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    > http://www.access-one.com/rjn
    >
    > Unless otherwise specifically stated, expressing
    > personal opinions and NOT speaking for any
    > employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    DS, Oct 14, 2003
    #15
  16. Nikki

    Bob Niland Guest

    > DS <spam_me_not@buzz_off.net> wrote:

    >> They could very easily prevent hijacks by
    >> applying a "secret question" dialog for
    >> any changes to accounts (email address,
    >> phone, address of record).


    ....and password, I might add.

    > Same people who allow their accounts to be
    > hi-jacked by responding to those "official"
    > looking emails requesting all manner of
    > personal ebay info would just as blindly
    > type in the "secret" question along with
    > the answer.


    The spoofer would not have the secret question.

    If eBay stupidly offered only a list of
    5 obvious secret questions (e.g. mother's
    maiden name), the spoofers might catch 20%
    of the naive.

    But if the question and answer have to be
    made up by the user, the spoofers will have
    to settle for just getting the password, and
    then try to "social engineer" around the
    restraints of the secret question - i.e. use
    whatever "I forgot" process is in place.

    --
    Regards, PO Box 248
    Bob Niland Enterprise
    mailto: Kansas USA
    which, due to spam, is: 67441-0248
    email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
    http://www.access-one.com/rjn

    Unless otherwise specifically stated, expressing
    personal opinions and NOT speaking for any
    employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
     
    Bob Niland, Oct 14, 2003
    #16
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