Easy Fix for Infamous Canon E18 Error

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by T.C. Mann, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. T.C. Mann

    T.C. Mann Guest

    I own a Canon A60 Powershot which just recently started giving me the
    E18 error. After turning on the camera, the lens would sometimes
    almost fully expand and other times it would only expand about half
    the way or less and then shutdown with several beeps. The first thing
    I tried was fresh batteries but the results were identical. The error
    shows in both capture and reply modes and was 100% consistent.

    I googled the E18 error and discovered that this is a very common
    problem which affects many Canon models. The error has to do with the
    lens drive mechanism and/or lens position sensor malfunctioning which
    occurs when dirt gets lodged into the gears/drive track or position
    sensor. Since it typically isn't worth the cost to send the camera
    back to Canon for repair (if it's out of warranty), the only option is
    to trash the camera or try to repair it yourself. Taking the camera
    apart is a fairly complex task involving removing many tiny screws,
    delicate ribbon cables, and minature circuit boards, just to get to
    the lens mechanism which must then be disassembled, and cleaned. Then
    the whole thing needs to be re-assembled. A operation that would take
    several hours assuming it could be done at all without damaging
    something in the process.

    Rather than taking the aforementioned route, I decided to take a
    different approach. First, I removed the plastic ring around the lens
    (push in button at 7:00 position just below lens and twist ring an
    eighth of a turn CCW and pull straight out). Then I used my trusty
    shop vac (which has a tremendous suction compared to a regular vacuum)
    and centered its 2" hose carefully over of the lens. I turned on the
    vac and at the same time I turned on the camera to allow the lens to
    move into the hose and the chance to allow any trapped dirt to become
    dislodged (the strong vacuum also helps to pull the lens completely
    forward). I turned on and off the camera three times to ensure that
    all dirt had been removed before I tested the results. Lo and behold
    the problem was fixed! Hopefully, this nifty trick can help others
    who are experiencing the same problem.

    T.C.
    T.C. Mann, Jun 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. T.C. Mann

    Mark P. Guest

    On Thu, 14 Jun 2007 10:57:11 -0700, "T.C. Mann" <>
    wrote:

    >I own a Canon A60 Powershot which just recently started giving me the
    >E18 error. After turning on the camera, the lens would sometimes
    >almost fully expand and other times it would only expand about half
    >the way or less and then shutdown with several beeps. The first thing
    >I tried was fresh batteries but the results were identical. The error
    >shows in both capture and reply modes and was 100% consistent.
    >
    >I googled the E18 error and discovered that this is a very common
    >problem which affects many Canon models. The error has to do with the
    >lens drive mechanism and/or lens position sensor malfunctioning which
    >occurs when dirt gets lodged into the gears/drive track or position
    >sensor. Since it typically isn't worth the cost to send the camera
    >back to Canon for repair (if it's out of warranty), the only option is
    >to trash the camera or try to repair it yourself. Taking the camera
    >apart is a fairly complex task involving removing many tiny screws,
    >delicate ribbon cables, and minature circuit boards, just to get to
    >the lens mechanism which must then be disassembled, and cleaned. Then
    >the whole thing needs to be re-assembled. A operation that would take
    >several hours assuming it could be done at all without damaging
    >something in the process.
    >
    >Rather than taking the aforementioned route, I decided to take a
    >different approach. First, I removed the plastic ring around the lens
    >(push in button at 7:00 position just below lens and twist ring an
    >eighth of a turn CCW and pull straight out). Then I used my trusty
    >shop vac (which has a tremendous suction compared to a regular vacuum)
    >and centered its 2" hose carefully over of the lens. I turned on the
    >vac and at the same time I turned on the camera to allow the lens to
    >move into the hose and the chance to allow any trapped dirt to become
    >dislodged (the strong vacuum also helps to pull the lens completely
    >forward). I turned on and off the camera three times to ensure that
    >all dirt had been removed before I tested the results. Lo and behold
    >the problem was fixed! Hopefully, this nifty trick can help others
    >who are experiencing the same problem.
    >
    >T.C.





    Very clever solution. Took nerve. Of course, it was going into the
    trash anyhow, might as well give it a shot. Great attitude.
    Mark P., Jun 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. T.C. Mann

    Charles Guest

    "T.C. Mann" <> wrote in message
    news:...


    > Rather than taking the aforementioned route, I decided to take a
    > different approach. First, I removed the plastic ring around the lens
    > (push in button at 7:00 position just below lens and twist ring an
    > eighth of a turn CCW and pull straight out). Then I used my trusty
    > shop vac (which has a tremendous suction compared to a regular vacuum)
    > and centered its 2" hose carefully over of the lens. I turned on the
    > vac and at the same time I turned on the camera to allow the lens to
    > move into the hose and the chance to allow any trapped dirt to become
    > dislodged (the strong vacuum also helps to pull the lens completely
    > forward). I turned on and off the camera three times to ensure that
    > all dirt had been removed before I tested the results. Lo and behold
    > the problem was fixed! Hopefully, this nifty trick can help others
    > who are experiencing the same problem.


    Clever!
    Charles, Jun 14, 2007
    #3
  4. T.C. Mann

    Rudy Lacchin Guest

    "T.C. Mann" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I own a Canon A60 Powershot which just recently started giving me the
    > E18 error.


    I got this error after the lens received a very slight bump. I found
    http://www.e18error.com/, gave the lens assembly a gentle tweak and it all
    jumped back into place. It's been fine ever since.

    A lesson learned!

    R.
    Rudy Lacchin, Jun 16, 2007
    #4
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