early adopters, what were your first DVDs

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Grand Inquisitor, Sep 29, 2003.

  1. What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought? What made you an
    early adopter? Where did you first see the technology in action? Were
    you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"
    For those of you who weren't early adopters, what release made you
    buckle down and say "all right, no more VHS, I'm gonna buy a DVD
    player"? For me it was the CC edition of The Third Man. I stopped
    buying VHS tapes when I saw that come out, and when I realized all my
    friends had DVD players (via their PS2s) I knew I was desperately out of
    touch with home theater technology.
    --
    "Get rid of the Range Rover. You are not responsible for patrolling
    Australia's Dingo Barrier Fence, nor do you work the Savannah, capturing
    and tagging wildebeests."
    --Michael J. Nelson

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Sep 29, 2003
    #1
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  2. Grand Inquisitor

    Zimmy Guest

    "Grand Inquisitor" <> wrote in message
    news:wd_db.38332$...
    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?


    I was in a test city (does anyone remember that?) and could only buy
    Polygram and Sony discs. I bought Jerry Maguire and Fargo. Then I bought
    Unforgiven, Exorcist, Batman, and the Wild Bunch from Ken Cranes (I think)
    which was the only way I could get Warner discs.

    What made you an
    > early adopter?


    I was heavy into LD and was won over buy discreet 5.1 audio. Almost all the
    DVDs coming out had 5.1 sound. Also, the size of the media amazed me
    (coming from LD).

    > Where did you first see the technology in action?


    At a laserdisc rental store that was long gone. Also, Best Buy had an
    excellent demo going.

    > Were you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD

    Forever!"

    Immediately. I couldn't believe how much better it looked than LD. It
    handled colors so much better (including blacks).

    > Grand Inquisitor
    > http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
    >
     
    Zimmy, Sep 29, 2003
    #2
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  3. Grand Inquisitor

    Goldfinger Guest

    "Zimmy" <> wrote in message
    news:bl9rkd$9rsh2$-berlin.de...

    > Immediately. I couldn't believe how much better it looked than LD. It
    > handled colors so much better (including blacks).


    Well, I said that when I first saw LD in action (mainly in Karaoke joints).
    How time has changed!
     
    Goldfinger, Sep 29, 2003
    #3
  4. Grand Inquisitor wrote:

    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?


    "A Boy and His Dog" (which is getting a new 16:9 enhanced release) and
    "Blade Runner".

    > What made you an
    > early adopter?


    I had an opportunity to buy a 56" 16:9 RPTV with component inputs and a
    top of the line DVD player with component outputs for less than $3500,
    delivered. That was in April of 1997.

    > Where did you first see the technology in action?


    In my home. I was probably one of the very first consumers to watch a
    16:9 enhanced DVD on a 16:9 display via component inputs in the comfort
    of my own home. Did anyone else manage this before the first week of
    May, 1997?

    > Were
    > you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"


    The opening sequence of "Blade Runner" got a completely involuntary
    "WOW" out of me. That was very unlike my first LD ("Hunt for Red
    October") which was so bad I almost returned my LD player.

    > For those of you who weren't early adopters, what release made you
    > buckle down and say "all right, no more VHS, I'm gonna buy a DVD
    > player"?


    I still buy the odd VHS tape of something that I want to see that isn't
    available on any better format.

    Matthew

    --
    <http://www.mlmartin.com/bbq/>

    Thermodynamics For Dummies: You can't win.
    You can't break even.
    You can't get out of the game.
     
    Matthew L. Martin, Sep 29, 2003
    #4
  5. Grand Inquisitor

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Goldfinger" <> wrote in message
    news:bA_db.5188569$...
    >
    > "Zimmy" <> wrote in message
    > news:bl9rkd$9rsh2$-berlin.de...
    >
    > > Immediately. I couldn't believe how much better it looked than LD. It
    > > handled colors so much better (including blacks).

    >
    > Well, I said that when I first saw LD in action (mainly in Karaoke

    joints).
    > How time has changed!


    I was absolutely convinced that I would be immediately able to see and hear
    the effects of lossy compression on the sound and image. I was prepared to
    resist and hang onto Laserdisc forever.

    That lasted about five minutes into a demo at a local independent AV
    retailer.

    I don't remember what was first. This was late '97, the dawn of the etailing
    frenzy that brought us Reel.com, 800.com, DVD's for a dollar, coupons for
    everything, stacking coupons with price-matching, and all that other
    insanity that had a lot of us averaging less than $5 per new-release
    purchase for the next year or two.

    RichC
     
    Rich Clark, Sep 29, 2003
    #5
  6. Grand Inquisitor wrote:

    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?


    "Tenchi Muyo in Love"
    For us other 40% of early adopters, we could care less that "Interview
    with the Vampire" looked better than the LD, we just didn't want to buy
    any more anime on degradable VHS that needed fast-forwarding and rewinding.

    > What made you an early adopter?


    Define "early"--
    Ie., before or after the DIVx Death Pronouncement of June 1999, widely
    considered to be the "birthday" of mainstream DVD?
    (Mine was right on the month, so, y'know, could go either way.)

    But if you want an answer, the possibility of grabbing up a
    reconditioned DIVx at scavenger prices at Circuit City a week later, and
    then finding out even *they* weren't worth it, so might as well go the
    whole Best Buy mile.

    > Where did you first see the technology in action?


    Siskel & Ebert, like everybody else.

    > Were you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"


    Think I was still in the "Third Rock from the Sun" category, but I'd
    been jealous of LD's from way back.
    (Yes, even those RCA Selectavisions looked cool at the time...)

    > For those of you who weren't early adopters, what release made you
    > buckle down and say "all right, no more VHS, I'm gonna buy a DVD
    > player"?


    AnimEigo's "Urusei Yatsura"--For the shelf space alone, never mind
    click-access and permanence.
    If you'd never collected anime from the VHS fansub days, you will never
    understand why We anime fans were the technology's backbone supporters
    underneath the Rest of You during the early days...You OWE us.

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Sep 29, 2003
    #6
  7. "Grand Inquisitor" <> wrote in message
    news:wd_db.38332$...

    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?


    The very first DVD that I bought was the first release of "The Wizard of Oz"
    and then got a $399 Sony DVP-3000 (a floor sample) from a NJ "Nobody Beats
    The Wiz" ( no pun intended). I went home, hooked it up and compared to my
    THX laserdisc copy of TWOZ and never looked back.

    > What made you an early adopter?


    I love movies, and if you like movies you're always looking for better ways
    of enjoying them. I thought that laser was it. Wrong!

    >Where did you first see the technology in action?


    Harvey Radio in NYC.

    > Were you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD

    Forever!"

    You mean after I saw DVD hooked up on my home system? Nope. My only concern,
    and the concern of early DVD adopters was the threat of Circuit City and
    some studios (Disney) with DVIX. You all remember those, don't you?


    I don't remember which was my first Laser, I just got there late, almost at
    the end.

    César.
     
    César N. Díaz, Sep 29, 2003
    #7
  8. Grand Inquisitor

    Andrew Venor Guest

    Grand Inquisitor wrote:

    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?


    I bought Dark City, Star Trek First Contact, and Zero Effect the same day I
    bought my first DVD player.

    > What made you an early adopter?


    Widescreen presentation, and the extras.

    > Where did you first see the technology in action?


    Fry's Electronics in Sunnyvale, CA.

    > Were you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD
    > Forever!"


    While I was won over right away, I waited a couple of months until I found a
    player at a sale price.

    While I wanted to, I never got into laser disks. When I was in the Navy I
    didn't have room to keep one on the ship. And then as a starving student in
    college I had the room for one, but I couldn't couldn't afford it.

    ALV
     
    Andrew Venor, Sep 29, 2003
    #8
  9. Grand Inquisitor

    luminos Guest

    Super Speedway - Africa the Serengehti (IMAX)
    Glory
    From the Earth to the Moon

    "Matthew L. Martin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Grand Inquisitor wrote:
    >
    > > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?

    >
    > "A Boy and His Dog" (which is getting a new 16:9 enhanced release) and
    > "Blade Runner".
    >
    > > What made you an
    > > early adopter?

    >
    > I had an opportunity to buy a 56" 16:9 RPTV with component inputs and a
    > top of the line DVD player with component outputs for less than $3500,
    > delivered. That was in April of 1997.
    >
    > > Where did you first see the technology in action?

    >
    > In my home. I was probably one of the very first consumers to watch a
    > 16:9 enhanced DVD on a 16:9 display via component inputs in the comfort
    > of my own home. Did anyone else manage this before the first week of
    > May, 1997?
    >
    > > Were
    > > you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"

    >
    > The opening sequence of "Blade Runner" got a completely involuntary
    > "WOW" out of me. That was very unlike my first LD ("Hunt for Red
    > October") which was so bad I almost returned my LD player.
    >
    > > For those of you who weren't early adopters, what release made you
    > > buckle down and say "all right, no more VHS, I'm gonna buy a DVD
    > > player"?

    >
    > I still buy the odd VHS tape of something that I want to see that isn't
    > available on any better format.
    >
    > Matthew
    >
    > --
    > <http://www.mlmartin.com/bbq/>
    >
    > Thermodynamics For Dummies: You can't win.
    > You can't break even.
    > You can't get out of the game.
    >
     
    luminos, Sep 29, 2003
    #9
  10. Grand Inquisitor

    Lucas Tam Guest

    Grand Inquisitor <> wrote in news:wd_db.38332$uJ2.24036
    @fe3.columbus.rr.com:

    > What made you an
    > early adopter?


    The fact that DVDs don't wear out... and I don't need to rewind tapes
    anymore!

    I never bought any VHS tapes, because I knew sooner or later the tapes
    would break ; )

    --
    Lucas Tam ()
    Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
     
    Lucas Tam, Sep 29, 2003
    #10
  11. My first DVD was Apollo 13, which I bought at Fry's in Sunnyvale on my
    first trip to California early 1997.

    I didn't have a player at the time, but I knew that I wanted a
    multi-region player, and this DVD is region 1, while Sweden is region
    2.

    A few months later I bought a used multi-region Pioneer DV-505
    player. I later replaced that with a Pioneer 525 to be able to play
    S-VCD, but it was too noisy and I bought a new Pioneer 444 and had it
    multiregion and macrovision hacked. My old Sony CRT projector can't
    handle macrovision, otherwise I wouldn't have bothered.

    I never was into LD, and I don't think LD ever was popular in Sweden.

    The Apollo 13 DVD is now autographed by no other than Gene Kranz,
    which I met in Denver in February :)

    Thomas
     
    Thomas Tornblom, Sep 29, 2003
    #11
  12. Grand Inquisitor

    Thomas Bell Guest

    Grand Inquisitor wrote:
    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought? What made you an
    > early adopter? Where did you first see the technology in action? Were
    > you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"
    > For those of you who weren't early adopters, what release made you
    > buckle down and say "all right, no more VHS, I'm gonna buy a DVD
    > player"? For me it was the CC edition of The Third Man. I stopped
    > buying VHS tapes when I saw that come out, and when I realized all my
    > friends had DVD players (via their PS2s) I knew I was desperately out of
    > touch with home theater technology.


    Like some others that have posted on this thread, I was a laserdisc
    fanatic and stuck with the format about a year and a half after dvds
    were common in the marketplace. I had seen a few demos and bought an
    early Toshiba player and a few dvds (True Lies, Starship Troopers 1st
    issue, etc) but still held on to the LD format as I really didn't see a
    huge difference image-wise and frankly, many of my LD titles, especially
    the DTS encoded movies like Titanic sounded and in some cases looked far
    superior to their dvd counterparts. Add to that I got a few titles that
    had notoriously bad transfers (Highlander 1st issue) and the fact that
    many titles at the time weren't yet available on dvd and I really wasn't
    won over by the format.

    That changed when I bought a Sony KV-40XBR700 40" monitor and the
    enhanced reslotion over my old non-16:9 tv was stunning and really
    revealed the difference (and chroma noise) on LDs.

    T.B.
     
    Thomas Bell, Sep 29, 2003
    #12
  13. Thomas Bell wrote:

    > ... Add to that I got a few titles that
    > had notoriously bad transfers (Highlander 1st issue) and the fact that
    > many titles at the time weren't yet available on dvd and I really wasn't
    > won over by the format.
    >
    > That changed when I bought a Sony KV-40XBR700 40" monitor and the
    > enhanced reslotion over my old non-16:9 tv was stunning and really
    > revealed the difference (and chroma noise) on LDs.


    There was amazing resistance to that very concept on
    alt.video.laserdisc. Most couldn't see what the hoopla was about until
    they got their first 16:9 capable display. Some still claim not to see a
    difference.

    Matthew

    --
    <http://www.mlmartin.com/bbq/>

    Thermodynamics For Dummies: You can't win.
    You can't break even.
    You can't get out of the game.
     
    Matthew L. Martin, Sep 29, 2003
    #13
  14. Grand Inquisitor

    Justin Guest

    Derek Janssen wrote on [Mon, 29 Sep 2003 15:02:03 -0400]:
    > Define "early"--


    Before DIVX death. Well before.

    When the online stores were giving DVDs away. 3 for $1 at 800.com,
    FREEDVD coupon codes at reel.com
     
    Justin, Sep 29, 2003
    #14
  15. "Grand Inquisitor" <> wrote in message
    news:wd_db.38332$...
    > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?


    Dr. Strangelove. Blade Runner.

    > What made you an
    > early adopter?


    'Cause I'm so bad.

    > Where did you first see the technology in action? Were
    > you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"


    Never cared for LD. Too big. Too Expensive. Multiple disks you had to flip
    over in the middle of the movie. And unlike tape you couldn't record on it.
    I always sensed there had to be something better coming.
     
    Jerry Manhoey, Sep 29, 2003
    #15
  16. > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought? What made you an
    > early adopter? Where did you first see the technology in action? Were
    > you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD Forever!"





    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.daily-reviews.com
     
    Aaron J. Bossig, Sep 29, 2003
    #16
  17. Matthew L. Martin wrote:
    > I had an opportunity to buy a 56" 16:9 RPTV with component inputs and a
    > top of the line DVD player with component outputs for less than $3500,
    > delivered. That was in April of 1997.
    >


    Holy cow. You should have paid ten grand more than that in those days.

    --
    "Get rid of the Range Rover. You are not responsible for patrolling
    Australia's Dingo Barrier Fence, nor do you work the Savannah, capturing
    and tagging wildebeests."
    --Michael J. Nelson

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Sep 29, 2003
    #17
  18. > What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?

    First DVD I paid for: Star Trek: Insurrection (never got it--
    back then, buy.com was very unreliable)

    First DVD I paid for and actually took home: Billy Madison.

    >What made you an
    > early adopter?


    Just finishing high school, finally had some disposable income,
    I was excited by a format that offered durable, inexpensive copies
    of WS movies.

    >Where did you first see the technology in action?


    My friend's house. The first DVD I watched was Tomorrow Never Dies.

    >Were
    > you immediately won over or did you poo-poo it and declare "LD
    > Forever!"


    Oh, I was very skeptical of the idea of DVD. I loved LD so much, and
    was very impressed by what it delivered. I remember looking at the
    promises of DVD-- three versions of each movie on the same disc, and
    each in four different languages, and thought it just wasn't possible.
    No way. And if it was, it'd be so compressed that LD would easily blow
    it away.

    Then I watched TND, and became more familar with the design of the
    format. It became clear: at its very worst, DVD would be *as good*
    as LD. I instantly started doing research on which player I was going
    to get. Not long afterward, I got an RCA 5220p, which is still serving
    me well today.

    Great idea for a thread, BTW! :)




    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.daily-reviews.com
     
    Aaron J. Bossig, Sep 29, 2003
    #18
  19. Derek Janssen wrote:
    > If you'd never collected anime from the VHS fansub days, you will never
    > understand why We anime fans were the technology's backbone supporters
    > underneath the Rest of You during the early days...You OWE us.
    >
    > Derek Janssen
    >


    I thank all early adopters for adopting early. You guys all have your
    different motivations and all claim to be the driving force behind the
    success of the format. Porno fans have told me that it was porn that
    made DVD a success, technophiles with money have told me that without
    them it championing it it would never have succeeded, LD fans say that
    if it weren't for LD there never would have been DVD. On and on and on.
    Can't we all be friends?

    --
    "Get rid of the Range Rover. You are not responsible for patrolling
    Australia's Dingo Barrier Fence, nor do you work the Savannah, capturing
    and tagging wildebeests."
    --Michael J. Nelson

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Sep 29, 2003
    #19
  20. César N. Díaz wrote:

    > "Grand Inquisitor" <> wrote in message
    > news:wd_db.38332$...
    >
    >
    >>What were the first DVDs you early adopters bought?

    >
    >
    > The very first DVD that I bought was the first release of "The Wizard of Oz"
    > and then got a $399 Sony DVP-3000 (a floor sample) from a NJ "Nobody Beats
    > The Wiz" ( no pun intended). I went home, hooked it up and compared to my
    > THX laserdisc copy of TWOZ and never looked back.
    >


    Was that the same as the Criterion LD?

    > You mean after I saw DVD hooked up on my home system? Nope. My only concern,
    > and the concern of early DVD adopters was the threat of Circuit City and
    > some studios (Disney) with DVIX. You all remember those, don't you?
    >


    I was a late adopter. Late 2001. I'm so ashamed. But it was out of
    ignorance; I still blindly assumed budget DVD players were in the
    $300-$400 range. I've since then learned to pay avid attention to the
    prices of everything.

    > I don't remember which was my first Laser, I just got there late, almost at
    > the end.


    LD's heyday had to have been the early to mid-90s, right? It peaked in 93.

    --
    "Get rid of the Range Rover. You are not responsible for patrolling
    Australia's Dingo Barrier Fence, nor do you work the Savannah, capturing
    and tagging wildebeests."
    --Michael J. Nelson

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Sep 29, 2003
    #20
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