e-mail "times"?

Discussion in 'Firefox' started by joseph white, Nov 2, 2004.

  1. joseph white

    joseph white Guest

    I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.

    I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.

    I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    , and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    "George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?

    From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?
     
    joseph white, Nov 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. joseph white

    Moz Champion Guest

    joseph white wrote:

    > I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.
    >
    > I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    > wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.
    >
    > I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    > , and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    > form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    > user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    > games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    > "George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    > Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    > him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    > My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    > is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    > messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    > mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?
    >
    > From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?



    Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.

    essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    sent in YOUR own time.

    If your computer is set properly as to time AND location, it will not
    matter where your servers are, the time date stamp will be the same in
    Thunderbird.

    For example

    A person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone)
    creates and sends a message at 10am
    The header of the message actually reads 4am
    (Universal or GMT)
    When a person in the Central Time Zone receives it, it will read 9am to
    them, because thats what time it was when it was sent.

    --
    Mozilla Champion
    UFAQ - http://www.UFAQ.org
    Mozilla Champions - http://mozillachampions.mozdev.org
    Mozilla Manual - http://mozmanual.mozdev.org/
     
    Moz Champion, Nov 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. joseph white

    joseph white Guest

    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 08:15:49 GMT, Moz Champion
    <> wrote:

    >Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.
    >
    >essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    >and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    >timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    >sent in YOUR own time.
    >

    Thanks!
     
    joseph white, Nov 3, 2004
    #3
  4. joseph white

    Nobody Guest

    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 08:15:49 GMT, Moz Champion
    <> wrote:

    >joseph white wrote:
    >
    >> I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.
    >>
    >> I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    >> wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.
    >>
    >> I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    >> , and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    >> form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    >> user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    >> games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    >> "George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    >> Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    >> him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    >> My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    >> is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    >> messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    >> mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?
    >>
    >> From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?

    >
    >
    >Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.
    >
    >essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    >and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    >timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    >sent in YOUR own time.
    >
    >If your computer is set properly as to time AND location, it will not
    >matter where your servers are, the time date stamp will be the same in
    >Thunderbird.
    >
    >For example
    >
    >A person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone)
    >creates and sends a message at 10am
    >The header of the message actually reads 4am
    >(Universal or GMT)
    >When a person in the Central Time Zone receives it, it will read 9am to
    >them, because thats what time it was when it was sent.


    That doesn't compute... a person living in an area of Eastern Standard
    Time at 10 a.m. (or 1000 hours) would actually send that message at 3
    p.m. GMT or UTC (1500Z). The time stamp should show something as
    "minus five".

    But agreed, the person in Central Standard Time will receive it (not
    necessarily read it) at 9 a.m. or 0900 local.
     
    Nobody, Nov 4, 2004
    #4
  5. joseph white

    Moz Champion Guest

    Nobody wrote:

    > On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 08:15:49 GMT, Moz Champion
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>joseph white wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.
    >>>
    >>>I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    >>>wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.
    >>>
    >>>I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    >>>, and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    >>>form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    >>>user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    >>>games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    >>>"George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    >>>Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    >>>him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    >>>My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    >>>is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    >>>messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    >>>mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?
    >>>
    >>>From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?

    >>
    >>
    >>Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.
    >>
    >>essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    >>and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    >>timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    >>sent in YOUR own time.
    >>
    >>If your computer is set properly as to time AND location, it will not
    >>matter where your servers are, the time date stamp will be the same in
    >>Thunderbird.
    >>
    >>For example
    >>
    >>A person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone)
    >>creates and sends a message at 10am
    >>The header of the message actually reads 4am
    >>(Universal or GMT)
    >>When a person in the Central Time Zone receives it, it will read 9am to
    >>them, because thats what time it was when it was sent.

    >
    >
    > That doesn't compute... a person living in an area of Eastern Standard
    > Time at 10 a.m. (or 1000 hours) would actually send that message at 3
    > p.m. GMT or UTC (1500Z). The time stamp should show something as
    > "minus five".
    >
    > But agreed, the person in Central Standard Time will receive it (not
    > necessarily read it) at 9 a.m. or 0900 local.


    No.

    Caveat all computers are set correctly as to time and date and location.

    Someone in the Eastern time zone writes a message at 10am (their time)

    When it is sent it is time date stamped 4am (offset -5) Universal time

    If a person in Central gets it, their display will show it as written
    at 9am, exactly when it was written.

    Take a look at time stamps. Each time stamp bears a UNIVERSAL time (or
    Greenwhich Mean Time) plus an offset. The offset is ignored when another
    computer reads it, it simply takes the Universal time, adds (or
    subtracts) its own offset, and voila... local time.

    For example, if a person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone) wrote a
    message, and it was sent to people in various places they would see the
    time date as

    Ottawa Ontario 10am 02 Oct 2004
    San Diego CA 7am 02 Oct 2004
    Singapore 10pm 01 Oct 2004

    because that was exactly the time it was written expressed locally.

    --
    Mozilla Champion
    UFAQ - http://www.UFAQ.org
    Mozilla Champions - http://mozillachampions.mozdev.org
    Mozilla Manual - http://mozmanual.mozdev.org/
     
    Moz Champion, Nov 4, 2004
    #5
  6. joseph white

    Nobody Guest

    On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 09:54:32 GMT, Moz Champion
    <> wrote:

    >Nobody wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 08:15:49 GMT, Moz Champion
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>joseph white wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.
    >>>>
    >>>>I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    >>>>wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.
    >>>>
    >>>>I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    >>>>, and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    >>>>form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    >>>>user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    >>>>games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    >>>>"George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    >>>>Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    >>>>him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    >>>>My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    >>>>is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    >>>>messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    >>>>mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?
    >>>>
    >>>>From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.
    >>>
    >>>essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    >>>and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    >>>timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    >>>sent in YOUR own time.
    >>>
    >>>If your computer is set properly as to time AND location, it will not
    >>>matter where your servers are, the time date stamp will be the same in
    >>>Thunderbird.
    >>>
    >>>For example
    >>>
    >>>A person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone)
    >>>creates and sends a message at 10am
    >>>The header of the message actually reads 4am
    >>>(Universal or GMT)
    >>>When a person in the Central Time Zone receives it, it will read 9am to
    >>>them, because thats what time it was when it was sent.

    >>
    >>
    >> That doesn't compute... a person living in an area of Eastern Standard
    >> Time at 10 a.m. (or 1000 hours) would actually send that message at 3
    >> p.m. GMT or UTC (1500Z). The time stamp should show something as
    >> "minus five".
    >>
    >> But agreed, the person in Central Standard Time will receive it (not
    >> necessarily read it) at 9 a.m. or 0900 local.

    >
    >No.
    >
    >Caveat all computers are set correctly as to time and date and location.
    >
    >Someone in the Eastern time zone writes a message at 10am (their time)
    >
    >When it is sent it is time date stamped 4am (offset -5) Universal time
    >
    >If a person in Central gets it, their display will show it as written
    >at 9am, exactly when it was written.
    >
    >Take a look at time stamps. Each time stamp bears a UNIVERSAL time (or
    >Greenwhich Mean Time) plus an offset. The offset is ignored when another
    >computer reads it, it simply takes the Universal time, adds (or
    >subtracts) its own offset, and voila... local time.
    >
    >For example, if a person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone) wrote a
    >message, and it was sent to people in various places they would see the
    >time date as
    >
    >Ottawa Ontario 10am 02 Oct 2004
    >San Diego CA 7am 02 Oct 2004
    >Singapore 10pm 01 Oct 2004
    >
    >because that was exactly the time it was written expressed locally.


    How do you "get" a message written at 10 a.m. Eastern to be stamped 4
    a.m.? Your calculation is strange.

    10 a.m. Eastern Standard is 1500Z... it would be stamped with 3 p.m.
     
    Nobody, Nov 4, 2004
    #6
  7. joseph white

    Moz Champion Guest

    Nobody wrote:

    > On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 09:54:32 GMT, Moz Champion
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Nobody wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 08:15:49 GMT, Moz Champion
    >>><> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>joseph white wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    >>>>>wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    >>>>>, and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    >>>>>form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    >>>>>user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    >>>>>games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    >>>>>"George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    >>>>>Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    >>>>>him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    >>>>>My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    >>>>>is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    >>>>>messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    >>>>>mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.
    >>>>
    >>>>essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    >>>>and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    >>>>timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    >>>>sent in YOUR own time.
    >>>>
    >>>>If your computer is set properly as to time AND location, it will not
    >>>>matter where your servers are, the time date stamp will be the same in
    >>>>Thunderbird.
    >>>>
    >>>>For example
    >>>>
    >>>>A person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone)
    >>>>creates and sends a message at 10am
    >>>>The header of the message actually reads 4am
    >>>>(Universal or GMT)
    >>>>When a person in the Central Time Zone receives it, it will read 9am to
    >>>>them, because thats what time it was when it was sent.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>That doesn't compute... a person living in an area of Eastern Standard
    >>>Time at 10 a.m. (or 1000 hours) would actually send that message at 3
    >>>p.m. GMT or UTC (1500Z). The time stamp should show something as
    >>>"minus five".
    >>>
    >>>But agreed, the person in Central Standard Time will receive it (not
    >>>necessarily read it) at 9 a.m. or 0900 local.

    >>
    >>No.
    >>
    >>Caveat all computers are set correctly as to time and date and location.
    >>
    >>Someone in the Eastern time zone writes a message at 10am (their time)
    >>
    >>When it is sent it is time date stamped 4am (offset -5) Universal time
    >>
    >>If a person in Central gets it, their display will show it as written
    >>at 9am, exactly when it was written.
    >>
    >>Take a look at time stamps. Each time stamp bears a UNIVERSAL time (or
    >>Greenwhich Mean Time) plus an offset. The offset is ignored when another
    >>computer reads it, it simply takes the Universal time, adds (or
    >>subtracts) its own offset, and voila... local time.
    >>
    >>For example, if a person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone) wrote a
    >>message, and it was sent to people in various places they would see the
    >>time date as
    >>
    >>Ottawa Ontario 10am 02 Oct 2004
    >>San Diego CA 7am 02 Oct 2004
    >>Singapore 10pm 01 Oct 2004
    >>
    >>because that was exactly the time it was written expressed locally.

    >
    >
    > How do you "get" a message written at 10 a.m. Eastern to be stamped 4
    > a.m.? Your calculation is strange.
    >
    > 10 a.m. Eastern Standard is 1500Z... it would be stamped with 3 p.m.



    You are referring to summer time, not standard.
    Zulu time, which refers to Universal time as well (GMT) is only 5 hours
    since the clocks went back, it WAS six hours during Daylight Savings or
    Summer time.

    Its after Oct 30th... oh I see my error.
    You are correct, since the example I used was dated 02 Oct, I should
    have used the DST calculation (-6) not the standard (-5)
    mea culpa, I goofed on using the wrong time in use on the example date.

    --
    Mozilla Champion
    UFAQ - http://www.UFAQ.org
    Mozilla Champions - http://mozillachampions.mozdev.org
    Mozilla Manual - http://mozmanual.mozdev.org/
     
    Moz Champion, Nov 5, 2004
    #7
  8. joseph white

    Nobody Guest

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2004 01:07:33 GMT, Moz Champion
    <> wrote:

    >Nobody wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 04 Nov 2004 09:54:32 GMT, Moz Champion
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Nobody wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 08:15:49 GMT, Moz Champion
    >>>><> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>joseph white wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I use Mozilla Thunderbird 0.8 as my e-mail client.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I am aware there is a more current version of it, but I thought I'd
    >>>>>>wait until 1.0 comes out to install the newer version.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I have a web site, a pretty lame personal web site at http://jm000.net
    >>>>>>, and often peruse my web site's log file My web site has a "comment
    >>>>>>form" Comment messages help me to me in determining the identity of a
    >>>>>>user out of my own curiosity. For example, if a visitor plays on-line
    >>>>>>games on my web site with each visit, I might find it interesting,
    >>>>>>"George likes to play on-line games". I have a mystery visitor from
    >>>>>>Ottawa, Ontario. He's sent me a comment, but I cannot fully identify
    >>>>>>him, I need to correlate his comment to a particular log file entry.
    >>>>>>My web site is hosted by a web host using EST. My email client server
    >>>>>>is run by an ISP using CST. what are the time zones on my e-mail
    >>>>>>messages? Are they the time of the mail's post time using EST or of my
    >>>>>>mail server's receipt time for the message on CST?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>From my own test, it seems it's the latter. Does anyone here know?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Email times are given in Universal time, with an offset for location.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>essentially, emails are timedate stamped with the time in Greenwhich,
    >>>>>and an offset. When your computer reads the email, it takes the
    >>>>>timedate, applies its own offset, and voila, the time the message was
    >>>>>sent in YOUR own time.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>If your computer is set properly as to time AND location, it will not
    >>>>>matter where your servers are, the time date stamp will be the same in
    >>>>>Thunderbird.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>For example
    >>>>>
    >>>>>A person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone)
    >>>>>creates and sends a message at 10am
    >>>>>The header of the message actually reads 4am
    >>>>>(Universal or GMT)
    >>>>>When a person in the Central Time Zone receives it, it will read 9am to
    >>>>>them, because thats what time it was when it was sent.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>That doesn't compute... a person living in an area of Eastern Standard
    >>>>Time at 10 a.m. (or 1000 hours) would actually send that message at 3
    >>>>p.m. GMT or UTC (1500Z). The time stamp should show something as
    >>>>"minus five".
    >>>>
    >>>>But agreed, the person in Central Standard Time will receive it (not
    >>>>necessarily read it) at 9 a.m. or 0900 local.
    >>>
    >>>No.
    >>>
    >>>Caveat all computers are set correctly as to time and date and location.
    >>>
    >>>Someone in the Eastern time zone writes a message at 10am (their time)
    >>>
    >>>When it is sent it is time date stamped 4am (offset -5) Universal time
    >>>
    >>>If a person in Central gets it, their display will show it as written
    >>>at 9am, exactly when it was written.
    >>>
    >>>Take a look at time stamps. Each time stamp bears a UNIVERSAL time (or
    >>>Greenwhich Mean Time) plus an offset. The offset is ignored when another
    >>>computer reads it, it simply takes the Universal time, adds (or
    >>>subtracts) its own offset, and voila... local time.
    >>>
    >>>For example, if a person in Ottawa Ontario (Eastern Time Zone) wrote a
    >>>message, and it was sent to people in various places they would see the
    >>>time date as
    >>>
    >>>Ottawa Ontario 10am 02 Oct 2004
    >>>San Diego CA 7am 02 Oct 2004
    >>>Singapore 10pm 01 Oct 2004
    >>>
    >>>because that was exactly the time it was written expressed locally.

    >>
    >>
    >> How do you "get" a message written at 10 a.m. Eastern to be stamped 4
    >> a.m.? Your calculation is strange.
    >>
    >> 10 a.m. Eastern Standard is 1500Z... it would be stamped with 3 p.m.

    >
    >
    >You are referring to summer time, not standard.
    >Zulu time, which refers to Universal time as well (GMT) is only 5 hours
    >since the clocks went back, it WAS six hours during Daylight Savings or
    >Summer time.
    >
    >Its after Oct 30th... oh I see my error.
    >You are correct, since the example I used was dated 02 Oct, I should
    >have used the DST calculation (-6) not the standard (-5)
    >mea culpa, I goofed on using the wrong time in use on the example date.


    Heh heh. Thanks... otherwise I thought I wuz going mad...
     
    Nobody, Nov 5, 2004
    #8
    1. Advertising

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