DxO Optics outputs to 72dpi only on Canon 5D?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Erasmo Acosta, Jan 24, 2007.

  1. Hello,

    I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?

    I also noticed that on the pulldown there are other dpi options (100,
    200, 300, 400). If I choose one of this it generates the correct DPI,
    but I dont see any difference on the picture (file size, or visually).
    My questions are: What does the DPI matter? Is DxO generating a 400
    dpi, although the original size it indicated on the "Output Settings"
    dialog was 72 dpi? How do I know that anything higher than 72 isn't
    just empty? Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, but I'm very
    confused here.
    Erasmo Acosta, Jan 24, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Erasmo Acosta

    Jim Guest

    "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?

    DPI is merely a scale factor. What is the size of the image in pixels?
    Jim
    Jim, Jan 24, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. The images are 12.8 Mega Pixels

    I just want to make sure that is worth having it on 400Dpi and that
    anything about 72 DPI is not just air occupying space.

    On Jan 24, 10:55 am, "Jim" <> wrote:
    > "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in messagenews:...> Hello,
    >
    > > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    > > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    > > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    > > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?DPI is merely a scale factor. What is the size of the image in pixels?

    > Jim
    Erasmo Acosta, Jan 24, 2007
    #3
  4. Erasmo Acosta

    Cgiorgio Guest

    The 72 DPI are just dead data fields in the EXIF - data, they do not
    influence printout in any way. 72 dpi or 96 dpi are common resolution values
    for computer screens. It has nothing to do with the image data which is
    contained in the much larger JPEG data section of the file, but someone
    deemed these fields useful when the EXIF specification was written.


    "Erasmo Acosta" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:...
    > The images are 12.8 Mega Pixels
    >
    > I just want to make sure that is worth having it on 400Dpi and that
    > anything about 72 DPI is not just air occupying space.
    >
    > On Jan 24, 10:55 am, "Jim" <> wrote:
    >> "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in
    >> messagenews:...>
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    >> > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    >> > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    >> > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?DPI is merely
    >> > a scale factor. What is the size of the image in pixels?

    >> Jim

    >
    Cgiorgio, Jan 24, 2007
    #4
  5. Erasmo Acosta

    Bill Funk Guest

    On 24 Jan 2007 13:47:42 -0800, "Erasmo Acosta" <>
    wrote:

    >The images are 12.8 Mega Pixels
    >
    >I just want to make sure that is worth having it on 400Dpi and that
    >anything about 72 DPI is not just air occupying space.


    The DPI (actually PPI) figure is purely nominal, and means nothing.
    Whay you're interested in is the dimensions in pixels.
    PPI only enters into the picture when you're printing he image; when
    you do that, you will set the PPI for the quality you want.
    IOW, don't worry about this.
    >
    >On Jan 24, 10:55 am, "Jim" <> wrote:
    >> "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in messagenews:...> Hello,
    >>
    >> > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    >> > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    >> > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    >> > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?DPI is merely a scale factor. What is the size of the image in pixels?

    >> Jim


    --
    California's Assembly prepared
    Monday to move the state's
    primary up to February. An early
    California primary has unique
    advantages. It gives each candidate
    the chance to spend all their money
    to finish third behind Gary Coleman
    and a porn star.
    Bill Funk, Jan 24, 2007
    #5
  6. Erasmo Acosta

    Jim Guest

    "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The images are 12.8 Mega Pixels

    No, what I meant was how many pixels horizontally and how many vertically.
    If the aspect ratio is 1.5 :1, then you have an image which is about 3000 x
    4500 pixels. You should be able to get a very nice 11x14 image (which would
    work out to be somewhat less than 300 ppi in the print).
    Jim
    >
    > I just want to make sure that is worth having it on 400Dpi and that
    > anything about 72 DPI is not just air occupying space.
    >
    > On Jan 24, 10:55 am, "Jim" <> wrote:
    >> "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in
    >> messagenews:...>
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    >> > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    >> > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    >> > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?DPI is merely
    >> > a scale factor. What is the size of the image in pixels?

    >> Jim

    >
    Jim, Jan 24, 2007
    #6
  7. Erasmo Acosta

    Colin_D Guest

    Erasmo Acosta wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?
    >
    > I also noticed that on the pulldown there are other dpi options (100,
    > 200, 300, 400). If I choose one of this it generates the correct DPI,
    > but I dont see any difference on the picture (file size, or visually).
    > My questions are: What does the DPI matter? Is DxO generating a 400
    > dpi, although the original size it indicated on the "Output Settings"
    > dialog was 72 dpi? How do I know that anything higher than 72 isn't
    > just empty? Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, but I'm very
    > confused here.
    >

    Without any interpolation of the image to increase or decrease the pixel
    count, the dpi - or more correctly, the ppi, pixels per inch - only
    determines how big the image will print. For viewing on screen, ppi is
    irrelevant.

    Normally one would change the ppi, and possibly alter the pixel count by
    interpolation, in an image editor like Photoshop when sizing the image
    for printing.

    There's a lot of confusion around about ppi and dpi. Pixels per inch
    (ppi) always refers to the image, and determines how big the image will
    print. If your image is, say, 2000 by 3000 pixels, and you set the ppi
    to 200, the image will print at 2000/200 by 3000/200, or 10 by 15
    inches. If you want to print at 20 by 30 inches, your choices are to
    either print at 100 ppi, or interpolate the image to give 200 ppi at 20
    by 30 inches.

    Dots per inch (dpi) always, and only, refers to printers. My Canon
    printer prints at 4800 by 2400 dpi. When it is printing, say, a 300 ppi
    image, the printer will lay down a pattern of 4800/300 by 2400/300, or
    16 by 8 individual dots of ink to make one pixel of the image. Of
    course it is a bit more sophisticated than that, the dots for each image
    pixel are modified to blend with the dots for the following pixel, and
    so on, but you will get the idea.

    DxO Optics is not the only image handling program to mix up ppi and dpi,
    and I guess if you know which is which it doesn't really matter, but
    technically at least they are not using the correct terms.

    Colin D.

    PS: Upgrading to the current DxO 4.1 is worth while. Not only are the
    images noticeably better, but it has more features and it executes
    faster. 3.5 used to take about 40 seconds per 6.3 MP image on my
    computer (Win 2000, 3.00 GHz with a gig of ram), and now 4.1 takes less
    than half that. When processing a quantity of images the time saving is
    significant.

    Colin D.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Colin_D, Jan 24, 2007
    #7
  8. On 24 Jan 2007 09:58:31 -0800, in rec.photo.digital "Erasmo Acosta"
    <> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    >it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    >about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    >I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?
    >
    >I also noticed that on the pulldown there are other dpi options (100,
    >200, 300, 400). If I choose one of this it generates the correct DPI,
    >but I dont see any difference on the picture (file size, or visually).
    >My questions are: What does the DPI matter? Is DxO generating a 400
    >dpi, although the original size it indicated on the "Output Settings"
    >dialog was 72 dpi? How do I know that anything higher than 72 isn't
    >just empty? Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, but I'm very
    >confused here.


    Might I suggest you start by getting a grip of the basic concepts at
    http://www.scantips.com
    --
    Ed Ruf ()
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jan 24, 2007
    #8
  9. Erasmo Acosta

    Skip Guest

    "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The images are 12.8 Mega Pixels
    >
    > I just want to make sure that is worth having it on 400Dpi and that
    > anything about 72 DPI is not just air occupying space.
    >
    > On Jan 24, 10:55 am, "Jim" <> wrote:
    >> "Erasmo Acosta" <> wrote in
    >> messagenews:...>
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> > I have DxO optics pro 3.5 on windows. Results look great, but I noticed
    >> > it only outputs to 72 dpi (JPG or TIFF) and there is nothing I can do
    >> > about it. On the "Output Sstings" tab it says 72 DPI is the maximum. If
    >> > I choose "Keep Original" it defaults to 72 DPI. Comments?DPI is merely
    >> > a scale factor. What is the size of the image in pixels?

    >> Jim

    >

    Resize the image to 8x12 and you will majically have a nearly 400dpi image.
    If you look at the dimensions of the image at 72dpi, you'll notice that it's
    somewhere in the neighborhood of 30x40 or bigger.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
    Skip, Jan 25, 2007
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. s

    combine 2 dsl outputs?

    s, Mar 2, 2006, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    3,334
    Jeff Liebermann
    Mar 3, 2006
  2. thomas

    Camera 72dpi --> Print 300dpi

    thomas, Feb 27, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    4,644
    Don Stauffer
    Feb 28, 2004
  3. Bill Smith

    Why always 72dpi in Photoshop?

    Bill Smith, Sep 27, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    2,212
    Roland Karlsson
    Oct 4, 2004
  4. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    379
    bmoag
    Nov 5, 2006
  5. Bruce
    Replies:
    25
    Views:
    1,822
    Trevor
    Apr 24, 2012
Loading...

Share This Page