DVD's finally kicked VHS's ass

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Mike Davis, Apr 24, 2004.

  1. Mike Davis

    Mike Davis Guest

    "Mike Kohary" <> wrote in message
    news:c6tj4u$gu2$...
    > "Invid Fan" <> wrote in message
    > news:300420040800378825%...
    > > In article <2go.com>, Justin
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Invid Fan wrote on [Thu, 29 Apr 2004 21:58:29 -0400]:
    > > > > In article <409000c6$0$28917$>, Derek Janssen
    > > > > <> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >> Michael Black wrote:
    > > > >>
    > > > >> > I've never had a VCR, and just got a DVD player last fall. In

    > getting
    > > > >> > into the stores to look at the DVDs, I keep seeing video

    cassettes
    > > > >> > that I've never given thought to. Some of them are outright

    steals
    > > > >> > compared to the same movie on DVD. My take is that the price is

    > low
    > > > >> > because the stores want to get rid of them.
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > It tempts me to buy a VCR right now, so I can buy things like

    > "Almost
    > > > >> > Famous" for five dolalrs.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> If, for whatever reason, you've never owned a VCR, you will NEVER
    > > > >> understand the appeal of DVD:
    > > > >>
    > > > >> "I mean, when I finish the tape...I can *rewind* it all the way

    back
    > to
    > > > >> the beginning!--How cool is that? And no matter how many times I

    see
    > > > >> the movie, the same five minutes of previews will always be on at

    the
    > > > >> beginning--It's kind of fun to look back!"
    > > > >>
    > > > > Then again, I wish the DVD specs had inculded the ability for the
    > > > > player to remember where you left off watching a disc. Tapes

    remember
    > > > > where you stopped even days later :)
    > > >
    > > > All the DVD players in my house remember where it was

    > >
    > > The three I've had never did once I took the disc out of the player,
    > > but maybe I've just been unlucky.

    >
    > I think these people are misunderstanding you...no player remembers where
    > you were at on a disc once you take it out of the player.
    >
    > Mike
    >

    Mike, Indeed they do.
    My Sony 715 progressive remembers the position of something like fifty
    discs. In fact, my SEVEN year old Sony 3000 will even remember something
    like twenty <ggg.> It's fairly old technology, I think the correct term is a
    "resume" feature. All the best, Mike
     
    Mike Davis, Apr 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mike Davis

    DigitalDeude Guest

    http://newsobserver.com/business/story/3549975p-3152506c.html

    Closing credits roll for VHS

    By MARK MINTON, Staff Writer

    For movie buffs still trying to light up their home TV screens with a
    VCR, the movie industry is fast unspooling the final scene: the big
    kiss-off.

    More than 95 percent of American households with television sets own a
    VCR. That's nearly twice as many as own a DVD player. But finding a
    movie for a VCR is becoming a mystery for the millions of consumers who
    haven't made the switch.

    They are not always easy to find because, for some retailers, the shift
    to DVD has hit critical mass -- and they have dropped VHS.

    Best Buy quit ordering VHS movies in the fall and now has none left on
    its shelves. Sam's Wholesale Club also has all but phased VHS out over
    the past six months, and typically isn't getting VHS copies of new
    releases anymore. On a recent day, the Sam's Club in North Raleigh had
    no VHS movies on its shelves.

    "We may have had a few around, like 'Pirates of the Caribbean' or 'Tomb
    Raider II,' but we haven't had too many," said Don Moravciki, manager of
    the Sam's Club.

    Rental-movie businesses, meanwhile, are down to buying only a token VHS
    tape or two for many releases, and no VHS copies for some less-popular
    films.

    A North Raleigh Blockbuster video store had a single VHS copy of "Lost
    in Translation," the Bill Murray movie, compared with two dozen DVD
    copies. Video Corner on Duraleigh Road in Raleigh didn't buy a VHS copy
    of the movie, said manager Todd Daniels.

    He said the movie studios charge the rental businesses more for VHS
    movies than for the more profitable DVD versions, discouraging them from
    buying VHS versions of all movies, Daniels said. But ever-strengthening
    consumer demand for DVDs is also behind the store's stocking decisions,
    he said.

    Consumers who favor the quality and durability of DVDs have made them
    the fastest consumer-technology conversion in history, according to the
    Consumer Electronics Association. Movie studios are giving people
    another reason to switch by adding extras to DVD tapes, such as deleted
    scenes and interviews with cast members.

    "It's better quality, and it gives you more for the price -- it's got,
    like, behind-the-scenes stuff," said Matthew Wallace, 26, of Creedmoor
    as he perused the disks at Wal-Mart.

    His is one of an estimated 50 percent of U.S. households with a DVD
    player, according to the Consumer Electronics Association.

    Rene Main of Willow Springs remains a VHS devotee. She recently found a
    VHS version of the recent Steve Martin comedy "Cheaper By the Dozen,"
    but said it's getting harder all the time to find titles on VHS.

    Customers in the market for X-rated movies are having more success. As
    DVD players have pushed aside living-room VCRs, many of the old machines
    are now set up in more private rooms, said A.B. Burgess, director of
    marketing and purchasing for Backstage Video, which has several stores
    in the Triangle and sells adults-only fare. He still orders about the
    same numbers of VHS and DVD movies.

    Although about 45 percent of U.S. households still have only a VCR,
    about 65 percent of rental-movie revenue came from DVDs, said Carrie
    Dieterich of the Video Software Dealers Association, a trade group. And
    the shift will only continue as VHS tapes become less and less available.

    But mainstream movie fans can take heart: A basic DVD player can now be
    purchased for as little as $39. Some retailers even give them away with
    another electronics purchase.
     
    DigitalDeude, Apr 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. Mike Davis

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "DigitalDeude" <> wrote in message
    news:KIMjc.128224$...
    > Consumers who favor the quality and durability of DVDs have made them
    > the fastest consumer-technology conversion in history, according to

    the
    > Consumer Electronics Association. Movie studios are giving people
    > another reason to switch by adding extras to DVD tapes, such as

    deleted
    > scenes and interviews with cast members.


    "DVD tapes". A brilliantly written article.

    > "It's better quality, and it gives you more for the price -- it's got,
    > like, behind-the-scenes stuff," said Matthew Wallace, 26, of Creedmoor
    > as he perused the disks at Wal-Mart.


    With impeccable research.
     
    Joshua Zyber, Apr 28, 2004
    #3
  4. Mike Davis

    Richard C. Guest

    "DigitalDeude" <> wrote in message
    news:KIMjc.128224$...
    :
    : Movie studios are giving people
    : another reason to switch by adding extras to DVD tapes,

    ===========
    What is that?
     
    Richard C., Apr 28, 2004
    #4
  5. Mike Davis

    TCS Guest

    On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 12:32:34 -0700, Derek Janssen <> wrote:
    >DigitalDeude wrote:


    >> http://newsobserver.com/business/story/3549975p-3152506c.html
    >>
    >> Closing credits roll for VHS
    >>
    >> By MARK MINTON, Staff Writer
    >>
    >> For movie buffs still trying to light up their home TV screens with a
    >> VCR, the movie industry is fast unspooling the final scene: the big
    >> kiss-off.
    >>
    >> More than 95 percent of American households with television sets own a
    >> VCR. That's nearly twice as many as own a DVD player. But finding a
    >> movie for a VCR is becoming a mystery for the millions of consumers who
    >> haven't made the switch.


    >Think that's hard?--Try finding a VCR:
    >The one I'd had for seven years quit on me last month, so had to go to
    >Best Buy (because a Tivo won't play old tapes)...


    >Simply put, there ARE no VCR's on the shelf--Unless you count six or
    >seven different brands of cheesy entry-level VCR/DVD combos.
    >Out of four dedicated VCR's, picked up a Sony for $89....Try doing
    >*that* in 1992. 0_0


    Maybe you should shop elsewhere.
     
    TCS, Apr 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Mike Davis

    Mike Kohary Guest

    "TCS" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 12:32:34 -0700, Derek Janssen <> wrote:
    > >DigitalDeude wrote:

    >
    > >> http://newsobserver.com/business/story/3549975p-3152506c.html
    > >>
    > >> Closing credits roll for VHS
    > >>
    > >> By MARK MINTON, Staff Writer
    > >>
    > >> For movie buffs still trying to light up their home TV screens with a
    > >> VCR, the movie industry is fast unspooling the final scene: the big
    > >> kiss-off.
    > >>
    > >> More than 95 percent of American households with television sets own a
    > >> VCR. That's nearly twice as many as own a DVD player. But finding a
    > >> movie for a VCR is becoming a mystery for the millions of consumers who
    > >> haven't made the switch.

    >
    > >Think that's hard?--Try finding a VCR:
    > >The one I'd had for seven years quit on me last month, so had to go to
    > >Best Buy (because a Tivo won't play old tapes)...

    >
    > >Simply put, there ARE no VCR's on the shelf--Unless you count six or
    > >seven different brands of cheesy entry-level VCR/DVD combos.
    > >Out of four dedicated VCR's, picked up a Sony for $89....Try doing
    > >*that* in 1992. 0_0

    >
    > Maybe you should shop elsewhere.


    I think you missed the point...it really doesn't matter where he shops. The
    VCR is taking its last gasp.

    Mike
     
    Mike Kohary, Apr 28, 2004
    #6
  7. Mike Davis

    TCS Guest

    On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 09:59:38 -0700, Mike Kohary <> wrote:
    >"TCS" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 12:32:34 -0700, Derek Janssen <> wrote:
    >> >DigitalDeude wrote:

    >>
    >> >> http://newsobserver.com/business/story/3549975p-3152506c.html
    >> >>
    >> >> Closing credits roll for VHS
    >> >>
    >> >> By MARK MINTON, Staff Writer
    >> >>
    >> >> For movie buffs still trying to light up their home TV screens with a
    >> >> VCR, the movie industry is fast unspooling the final scene: the big
    >> >> kiss-off.
    >> >>
    >> >> More than 95 percent of American households with television sets own a
    >> >> VCR. That's nearly twice as many as own a DVD player. But finding a
    >> >> movie for a VCR is becoming a mystery for the millions of consumers who
    >> >> haven't made the switch.

    >>
    >> >Think that's hard?--Try finding a VCR:
    >> >The one I'd had for seven years quit on me last month, so had to go to
    >> >Best Buy (because a Tivo won't play old tapes)...

    >>
    >> >Simply put, there ARE no VCR's on the shelf--Unless you count six or
    >> >seven different brands of cheesy entry-level VCR/DVD combos.
    >> >Out of four dedicated VCR's, picked up a Sony for $89....Try doing
    >> >*that* in 1992. 0_0

    >>
    >> Maybe you should shop elsewhere.


    >I think you missed the point...it really doesn't matter where he shops. The
    >VCR is taking its last gasp.


    No argument there. DVD:VHS==CDR:cassette

    My current VCR is going to be my last VCR. I no longer use it to record
    shows as that task has been taken over by a PC running digital recorder
    software.
     
    TCS, Apr 28, 2004
    #7
  8. DigitalDeude wrote:
    > Consumers who favor the quality and durability of DVDs have made them
    > the fastest consumer-technology conversion in history, according to the
    > Consumer Electronics Association. Movie studios are giving people
    > another reason to switch by adding extras to DVD tapes, such as deleted
    > scenes and interviews with cast members.
    >


    DVD "tapes"? Yikes, who wrote this article, my dad? I remember once
    hearing somebody refer to "Nintendo tapes," meaning the cartridges.

    > "It's better quality, and it gives you more for the price -- it's got,
    > like, behind-the-scenes stuff," said Matthew Wallace, 26, of Creedmoor
    > as he perused the disks at Wal-Mart.
    >


    Journalism tip #1: Don't just grab the nearest idiot for an opinion.

    > Rene Main of Willow Springs remains a VHS devotee. She recently found a
    > VHS version of the recent Steve Martin comedy "Cheaper By the Dozen,"
    > but said it's getting harder all the time to find titles on VHS.
    >


    I could understand sticking with VHS if one were unable or unwilling to
    spend the cash (around $100) for a decent player from a name brand. But
    if you have the cash to continue buying movies, why not just make the
    switch? And don't tell me they're buying VHS tapes for their kids. Go
    look at the price of typical Disney VHS tape. Then look at the same
    movie on DVD. You tend to pay *more* for VHS, because they are
    inherently more expensive to make, for one thing.

    > But mainstream movie fans can take heart: A basic DVD player can now be
    > purchased for as little as $39. Some retailers even give them away with
    > another electronics purchase.
    >


    Yeah, a piece of garbage that you'll replace in less than a year.

    --
    "Don't ask me, I'm just a girl!"
    --Hilary Clinton

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Apr 28, 2004
    #8
  9. Grand Inquisitor () writes:
    > DigitalDeude wrote:
    >> Consumers who favor the quality and durability of DVDs have made them
    >> the fastest consumer-technology conversion in history, according to the
    >> Consumer Electronics Association. Movie studios are giving people
    >> another reason to switch by adding extras to DVD tapes, such as deleted
    >> scenes and interviews with cast members.
    >>

    >
    > DVD "tapes"? Yikes, who wrote this article, my dad? I remember once
    > hearing somebody refer to "Nintendo tapes," meaning the cartridges.
    >
    >> "It's better quality, and it gives you more for the price -- it's got,
    >> like, behind-the-scenes stuff," said Matthew Wallace, 26, of Creedmoor
    >> as he perused the disks at Wal-Mart.
    >>

    >
    > Journalism tip #1: Don't just grab the nearest idiot for an opinion.
    >
    >> Rene Main of Willow Springs remains a VHS devotee. She recently found a
    >> VHS version of the recent Steve Martin comedy "Cheaper By the Dozen,"
    >> but said it's getting harder all the time to find titles on VHS.
    >>

    >
    > I could understand sticking with VHS if one were unable or unwilling to
    > spend the cash (around $100) for a decent player from a name brand. But
    > if you have the cash to continue buying movies, why not just make the
    > switch? And don't tell me they're buying VHS tapes for their kids. Go
    > look at the price of typical Disney VHS tape. Then look at the same
    > movie on DVD. You tend to pay *more* for VHS, because they are
    > inherently more expensive to make, for one thing.
    >

    I'm not sure about that.

    I've never had a VCR, and just got a DVD player last fall. In getting
    into the stores to look at the DVDs, I keep seeing video cassettes
    that I've never given thought to. Some of them are outright steals
    compared to the same movie on DVD. My take is that the price is low
    because the stores want to get rid of them.

    It tempts me to buy a VCR right now, so I can buy things like "Almost
    Famous" for five dolalrs.

    It's basically the same situation as we saw ten years or so ago,
    when I kept finding, and buying, really good music cassettes because
    they were being sold off at low prices. This wasn't the "it's horrible
    junk and nobody will buy it" type of music that you wouldn't seek out
    in the first place, but well known artists that were selling on CD.

    Michael
     
    Michael Black, Apr 28, 2004
    #9
  10. Mike Davis

    Marci Guest

    I have no intention of getting rid of my VCR. Yes, I only buy movies on
    DVD to view, but I have a couple of shows that I record daily to watch
    when I have the time. I watch 'em, rewind 'em, and record over them the
    next day. Sure the quality sucks, but I'm only watching it once. When
    the tape dies, I put in another and I'm good to go for another whirl.

    I'd never give up my DVDs though! Almost all the movies I had on tape
    have been replaced with DVD. I'd never buy a VHS tape again. There are
    a few, however, that aren't available on DVD so I have to have a VCR to
    watch them.
     
    Marci, Apr 28, 2004
    #10
  11. DigitalDeude wrote:

    > http://newsobserver.com/business/story/3549975p-3152506c.html
    >
    > Closing credits roll for VHS
    >
    > By MARK MINTON, Staff Writer
    >
    > For movie buffs still trying to light up their home TV screens with a
    > VCR, the movie industry is fast unspooling the final scene: the big
    > kiss-off.
    >
    > More than 95 percent of American households with television sets own a
    > VCR. That's nearly twice as many as own a DVD player. But finding a
    > movie for a VCR is becoming a mystery for the millions of consumers who
    > haven't made the switch.


    Think that's hard?--Try finding a VCR:
    The one I'd had for seven years quit on me last month, so had to go to
    Best Buy (because a Tivo won't play old tapes)...

    Simply put, there ARE no VCR's on the shelf--Unless you count six or
    seven different brands of cheesy entry-level VCR/DVD combos.
    Out of four dedicated VCR's, picked up a Sony for $89....Try doing
    *that* in 1992. 0_0

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Apr 28, 2004
    #11
  12. That's it DigitalDeude I'm sick and tired of this crap!
    Now someone hit my music....
    > Best Buy quit ordering VHS movies in the fall and now has none left on
    > its shelves.


    Circuit City did that several years ago, in fact they were the
    first major retailer to quit carrying VHS.

    --
    Demolition Man
     
    Brian The Demolition Man Little, Apr 28, 2004
    #12
  13. Mike Davis

    Justin Guest

    Brian The Demolition Man Little wrote on [Wed, 28 Apr 2004 15:00:27 -0500]:
    > That's it DigitalDeude I'm sick and tired of this crap!
    > Now someone hit my music....
    >> Best Buy quit ordering VHS movies in the fall and now has none left on
    >> its shelves.

    >
    > Circuit City did that several years ago, in fact they were the
    > first major retailer to quit carrying VHS.


    I thought that was Borders
     
    Justin, Apr 28, 2004
    #13
  14. That's it Justin I'm sick and tired of this crap!
    Now someone hit my music....
    > Brian The Demolition Man Little wrote on [Wed, 28 Apr 2004 15:00:27
    > -0500]:
    >> That's it DigitalDeude I'm sick and tired of this crap!
    >> Now someone hit my music....
    >>> Best Buy quit ordering VHS movies in the fall and now has none left
    >>> on its shelves.

    >>
    >> Circuit City did that several years ago, in fact they were the
    >> first major retailer to quit carrying VHS.

    >
    > I thought that was Borders


    I swear CC was the first but you could be right.

    --
    Demolition Man
     
    Brian The Demolition Man Little, Apr 28, 2004
    #14
  15. Michael Black wrote:

    > I've never had a VCR, and just got a DVD player last fall. In getting
    > into the stores to look at the DVDs, I keep seeing video cassettes
    > that I've never given thought to. Some of them are outright steals
    > compared to the same movie on DVD. My take is that the price is low
    > because the stores want to get rid of them.
    >
    > It tempts me to buy a VCR right now, so I can buy things like "Almost
    > Famous" for five dolalrs.


    If, for whatever reason, you've never owned a VCR, you will NEVER
    understand the appeal of DVD:

    "I mean, when I finish the tape...I can *rewind* it all the way back to
    the beginning!--How cool is that? And no matter how many times I see
    the movie, the same five minutes of previews will always be on at the
    beginning--It's kind of fun to look back!"

    Derek Janssen ("I like that big, fat box, right on my movie shelf!")
     
    Derek Janssen, Apr 28, 2004
    #15
  16. Mike Davis

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "Marci" <> wrote in message
    news:XaTjc.38857$cF6.1698919@attbi_s04...
    > I have no intention of getting rid of my VCR. Yes, I only buy movies

    on
    > DVD to view, but I have a couple of shows that I record daily to watch
    > when I have the time. I watch 'em, rewind 'em, and record over them

    the
    > next day. Sure the quality sucks, but I'm only watching it once.

    When
    > the tape dies, I put in another and I'm good to go for another whirl.


    You need a TiVo.
     
    Joshua Zyber, Apr 29, 2004
    #16
  17. Mike Davis

    TCS Guest

    On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 23:03:37 GMT, Joshua Zyber <> wrote:
    >"Marci" <> wrote in message
    >news:XaTjc.38857$cF6.1698919@attbi_s04...
    >> I have no intention of getting rid of my VCR. Yes, I only buy movies

    >on
    >> DVD to view, but I have a couple of shows that I record daily to watch
    >> when I have the time. I watch 'em, rewind 'em, and record over them

    >the
    >> next day. Sure the quality sucks, but I'm only watching it once.

    >When
    >> the tape dies, I put in another and I'm good to go for another whirl.


    >You need a TiVo.



    or for cabletv: MythTV(linux) or showshifter(windows).
     
    TCS, Apr 29, 2004
    #17
  18. Mike Davis

    luminos Guest

    "Joshua Zyber" <> wrote in message
    news:dLWjc.13979$...
    > "Marci" <> wrote in message
    > news:XaTjc.38857$cF6.1698919@attbi_s04...
    > > I have no intention of getting rid of my VCR. Yes, I only buy movies

    > on
    > > DVD to view, but I have a couple of shows that I record daily to watch
    > > when I have the time. I watch 'em, rewind 'em, and record over them

    > the
    > > next day. Sure the quality sucks, but I'm only watching it once.

    > When
    > > the tape dies, I put in another and I'm good to go for another whirl.

    >
    > You need a TiVo.
    >
    >

    Or a nice HD based stand-alone DVD recorder that acts like a Tivo...
     
    luminos, Apr 29, 2004
    #18
  19. Mike Davis

    Robin Guest

    "Joshua Zyber" <>
    wrote in message
    news:dLWjc.13979$...
    > "Marci" <> wrote in message
    > news:XaTjc.38857$cF6.1698919@attbi_s04...
    > > I have no intention of getting rid of my VCR. Yes, I

    only buy movies
    > on
    > > DVD to view, but I have a couple of shows that I record

    daily to watch
    > > when I have the time. I watch 'em, rewind 'em, and

    record over them
    > the
    > > next day. Sure the quality sucks, but I'm only watching

    it once.
    > When
    > > the tape dies, I put in another and I'm good to go for

    another whirl.
    >
    > You need a TiVo.
    >
    >


    Better still, a Media Center PC!
     
    Robin, Apr 29, 2004
    #19
  20. Mike Davis

    Black Locust Guest

    In article <KIMjc.128224$>,
    DigitalDeude <> wrote:

    > They are not always easy to find because, for some retailers, the shift
    > to DVD has hit critical mass -- and they have dropped VHS.


    Are there any major retailers still stocking VHS? I can't think of any
    besides Walmart. It's a wonder the studios are even still producing VHS
    versions of their movies. Now if the rental stores would just catch up,
    pre-recorded VHS would finally just go away once and for all.

    > "It's better quality, and it gives you more for the price -- it's got,
    > like, behind-the-scenes stuff," said Matthew Wallace, 26, of Creedmoor
    > as he perused the disks at Wal-Mart.


    Hahaha.

    > Rene Main of Willow Springs remains a VHS devotee. She recently found a
    > VHS version of the recent Steve Martin comedy "Cheaper By the Dozen,"
    > but said it's getting harder all the time to find titles on VHS.


    What a fucking loser. She probably blew about 20 bucks on that POS VHS.
    For the money she has spent on roughly 3 VHS tapes, she could have
    bought herself a decent entry level DVD player. Take into account that
    she's likely wasting gas driving all around town trying to find a store
    that actually still sells VHS and she's just throwing her money in the
    trash because of her unwillingless to accept change. But I'm sure she
    has a huge collection of CD's. Where's the devotion to cassette tapes ya
    dumb bitch?
    --
    BL
     
    Black Locust, Apr 29, 2004
    #20
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