DVD protect

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Fernando, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. Fernando

    Fernando Guest

    I would like to protect a DVD produced by me for not allowing copies no
    authorized. How to do that?
    Tks
    Fernando
    Fernando, Apr 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. Fernando

    Tony soprano Guest

    "Fernando" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I would like to protect a DVD produced by me for not allowing copies no
    > authorized. How to do that?
    > Tks
    > Fernando
    >
    >

    Can't be done.

    Sure you could use Pro Coder or another piece of software that adds
    macrovision but any ripper would remove it easily.

    Commercial DVD makers can't even stop unauthorized copies.

    T.
    --
    "Logout, that cookie shit makes me nervous!" - Tony Soprano
    Tony soprano, Apr 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. Fernando

    Rob Guest

    "Fernando" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I would like to protect a DVD produced by me for not allowing copies no
    > authorized. How to do that?
    > Tks
    > Fernando
    >
    >

    Lock it away in a well hidden safe and tell no one about it.
    Rob, Apr 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Tue, 5 Apr 2005 10:12:47 -0300, "Fernando" <>
    wrote:

    >I would like to protect a DVD produced by me for not allowing copies no
    >authorized. How to do that?
    >Tks
    >Fernando
    >

    ___________________________________________________________

    LOL!

    Hollywood movie studios with their unlimited bank accounts can't do it,
    but this gentleman would like to find a little program he could download
    from the internet. Made my day.

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Fernando

    RichA Guest

    On Tue, 5 Apr 2005 10:12:47 -0300, "Fernando" <>
    wrote:

    >I would like to protect a DVD produced by me for not allowing copies no
    >authorized. How to do that?
    >Tks
    >Fernando
    >


    Make it only playable on computers and write into the software
    the need for a hard key (dongle). It still won't help.
    -Rich
    RichA, Apr 6, 2005
    #5
  6. Fernando

    Mark Spatny Guest

    Fernando, says...
    > I would like to protect a DVD produced by me for not allowing copies no
    > authorized. How to do that?
    > Tks
    > Fernando


    Instead of burning a regular video DVD, you could burn a data DVD with
    Windows Media files, and work with a company to set up a digital rights
    management system. If a person wants to watch the video, they will need
    to view it on a computer, log in to the internet, and supply password
    information. You can control how many times they can view the DVD, and
    when, before the file is no longer valid.

    Similar systems are available for quicktime movies, too.

    Unfortunately for you, regular video DVDs do not have a good way to
    protect against copying.
    Mark Spatny, Apr 6, 2005
    #6
  7. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 00:40:48 -0400, RichA <> wrote:

    >Make it only playable on computers and write into the software
    >the need for a hard key (dongle). It still won't help.
    >-Rich

    ___________________________________________________________

    Rich is correct. Think about it - anything that can be played can be
    cracked. Your set-top DVD player is 'cracking' the DVD as it plays,
    isn't it?

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 6, 2005
    #7
  8. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 06:12:10 GMT, Mark Spatny
    <> wrote:

    >Instead of burning a regular video DVD, you could burn a data DVD with
    >Windows Media files, and work with a company to set up a digital rights
    >management system. If a person wants to watch the video, they will need
    >to view it on a computer, log in to the internet, and supply password
    >information. You can control how many times they can view the DVD, and
    >when, before the file is no longer valid.

    ___________________________________________________________

    The WMA and WMV system can be 'cracked' by simply recording the output
    as the file plays. True, so far no one has cracked the original files,
    but recording the output does the job. I *might* have done it myself a
    time or two. :)

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 6, 2005
    #8
  9. Fernando

    Mark Spatny Guest

    Bill Turner, says...
    > On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 06:12:10 GMT, Mark Spatny
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Instead of burning a regular video DVD, you could burn a data DVD with
    > >Windows Media files, and work with a company to set up a digital rights
    > >management system. If a person wants to watch the video, they will need
    > >to view it on a computer, log in to the internet, and supply password
    > >information. You can control how many times they can view the DVD, and
    > >when, before the file is no longer valid.

    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > The WMA and WMV system can be 'cracked' by simply recording the output
    > as the file plays.


    That's not a crack, it's a lossy analog copy. Not the same thing at all.
    The point is, a physical copy of the DVD itself is useless, which is the
    best copy protection available right now.
    Mark Spatny, Apr 7, 2005
    #9
  10. Fernando

    Jeff Rife Guest

    Mark Spatny () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    > > The WMA and WMV system can be 'cracked' by simply recording the output
    > > as the file plays.

    >
    > That's not a crack, it's a lossy analog copy.


    There are programs that record the digital data of WMV (or WMA) after the
    source is decrypted. They act like a digital VCR, in a sense.

    --
    Jeff Rife | /"\ ASCII Ribbon Campaign
    | \ / against HTML e-mail
    | X and USENET posts
    | / \
    Jeff Rife, Apr 7, 2005
    #10
  11. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 07:35:03 GMT, Mark Spatny
    <> wrote:

    >That's not a crack, it's a lossy analog copy. Not the same thing at all.
    >The point is, a physical copy of the DVD itself is useless, which is the
    >best copy protection available right now.

    ___________________________________________________________

    You are correct of course, which is why I put 'cracked' in quotation
    marks.

    And just out of curiosity, why is it a DVD or CD can not be copied, bit
    for bit? I'm thinking of the way Norton Ghost (and other programs) can
    create a perfect clone of a hard drive. Why can't a DVD or CD be cloned
    the same way?

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 9, 2005
    #11
  12. Fernando

    Jeff Rife Guest

    Bill Turner () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    > And just out of curiosity, why is it a DVD or CD can not be copied, bit
    > for bit? I'm thinking of the way Norton Ghost (and other programs) can
    > create a perfect clone of a hard drive. Why can't a DVD or CD be cloned
    > the same way?


    It can be. I do it all the time.

    For CDs, you need some tools that take care of various copy-protection
    methods (bad sectors, weak sectors, sectors of non-standard size, etc.),
    and almost every CD can then be copied bit-for-bit. There are a few
    exceptions, though, as copy programs catch up with new protection systems.

    For DVD movies, they mostly just rely on the fact that the drives use
    hardware CSS decryption that must be triggered by a key from software.
    Without that, there are sectors on the drive that generate errors if you
    try to copy them. But, with a utility like AnyDVD, you can then copy
    files from the drive, or create a bit-image, since AnyDVD sends the drive
    the CSS keys that it needs. I use UltraISO to create my images, but
    Nero, etc., will do it just as well.

    I can then mount the image using Daemon Tools, and it appears to all
    software to be the original physical DVD disk in a drive, but with no CSS.
    So, it's not truly a bit-for-bit copy (since it is no longer encrypted),
    but it works just like one.

    --
    Jeff Rife |
    | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/Dilbert/TechBigot.gif
    Jeff Rife, Apr 9, 2005
    #12
  13. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Fri, 8 Apr 2005 23:55:03 -0400, Jeff Rife <> wrote>For
    CDs, you need some tools that take care of various copy-protection
    >methods (bad sectors, weak sectors, sectors of non-standard size, etc.),
    >and almost every CD can then be copied bit-for-bit. There are a few
    >exceptions, though, as copy programs catch up with new protection systems.
    >
    >For DVD movies, they mostly just rely on the fact that the drives use
    >hardware CSS decryption that must be triggered by a key from software.
    >Without that, there are sectors on the drive that generate errors if you
    >try to copy them. But, with a utility like AnyDVD, you can then copy
    >files from the drive, or create a bit-image, since AnyDVD sends the drive
    >the CSS keys that it needs. I use UltraISO to create my images, but
    >Nero, etc., will do it just as well.
    >
    >I can then mount the image using Daemon Tools, and it appears to all
    >software to be the original physical DVD disk in a drive, but with no CSS.
    >So, it's not truly a bit-for-bit copy (since it is no longer encrypted),
    >but it works just like one.

    ___________________________________________________________

    Yes, I know how to do that, but that isn't the answer to my original
    question. I'm wondering why one can not clone a CD or DVD using exact
    bit-for-bit copying, retaining all the CSS, non-standard sectors and
    everything, ending up with an exact copy? I've never seen this discussed
    on any of the groups or forums and I'm just curious why it isn't done.

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 9, 2005
    #13
  14. Fernando

    Jeff Rife Guest

    Bill Turner () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    > Yes, I know how to do that, but that isn't the answer to my original
    > question. I'm wondering why one can not clone a CD or DVD using exact
    > bit-for-bit copying, retaining all the CSS, non-standard sectors and
    > everything, ending up with an exact copy?


    For 99% of CDs, this is possible, since the bad sectors can't contain
    data that is needed for any reason, the cloning programs just create their
    own version of a "bad" sector. The only problematic disks are the ones
    that use "weak" sectors (which *are* readable but require some retries) and
    ones that physically alter the structure of the CD to increase the physical
    distance between certain sector boundaries, and then time the reads. Both
    of these techniques can cause failures for reads of even the original disk,
    though, so it's understandable that it's hard to reproduce them.

    DVD-ROM disks are no different from CDs (which includes all CDs...audio,
    CD-ROM, etc.), because they don't use CSS encryption.

    For DVD-Video, it's *possible* to accept the raw CSS-encrypted data as
    "good" and store it on disk for later writing, but this generates two
    issues that must be overcome:

    - The reads are "bad" according to everything you can check, because the
    CSS ends up giving you bad checksums (CRC, actually). But, there is no
    software available to decrypt the the CSS encryption to manually check
    if the data really is good. The drives do the decryption, and the DeCSS
    work-alikes do nothing but guess keys and pass them to the drive.

    - Writing out such bad sectors is also problematic, as it requires very raw
    writes and still offers no way to validate that what you have written is
    accurate.

    Since cloning a DVD-Video by decrypting and writing it out exactly but
    without the CSS encryption gives you *exactly* the same disc as far as
    all software is concerned, it's where the programming efforts have gone.

    --
    Jeff Rife |
    | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/OverTheHedge/HighTech.gif
    Jeff Rife, Apr 9, 2005
    #14
  15. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 14:10:30 -0400, Jeff Rife <> wrote:
    <snip>

    >Since cloning a DVD-Video by decrypting and writing it out exactly but
    >without the CSS encryption gives you *exactly* the same disc as far as
    >all software is concerned, it's where the programming efforts have gone.
    >
    >--
    >Jeff Rife |

    ___________________________________________________________

    Very interesting. Thank you, Jeff. Just what I wanted to know.

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 10, 2005
    #15
  16. Fernando

    Mark Spatny Guest

    Jeff Rife, says...
    > There are programs that record the digital data of WMV (or WMA) after the
    > source is decrypted. They act like a digital VCR, in a sense.


    Really? Such as? Can you name one, or point me to articles on the
    subject? I haven't seen those programs before, and I'd like to learn
    more.
    Mark Spatny, Apr 10, 2005
    #16
  17. Fernando

    Bill Turner Guest

    On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 07:05:29 GMT, Mark Spatny
    <> wrote:

    >Really? Such as? Can you name one, or point me to articles on the
    >subject? I haven't seen those programs before, and I'd like to learn
    >more.

    ___________________________________________________________

    CDMaster 32 will do it:
    http://www.zittware.com/Products/CDMaster32/cdmaster32.html

    There are probably others.

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 10, 2005
    #17
  18. Fernando

    Jeff Rife Guest

    Mark Spatny () wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    > Jeff Rife, says...
    > > There are programs that record the digital data of WMV (or WMA) after the
    > > source is decrypted. They act like a digital VCR, in a sense.

    >
    > Really? Such as? Can you name one, or point me to articles on the
    > subject? I haven't seen those programs before, and I'd like to learn
    > more.


    VirtualDub with the right filters/codecs is supposed to be able to do it,
    and I know there are programs aimed specifically at this (as opposed to
    general-purpose video software). Start at http://www.dvdrhelp.com/ and
    look at some of the listed software.

    --
    Jeff Rife | "I'm reading a great John Grisham novel...it's
    | about a young Southern lawyer who fights an
    | evil corporate giant."
    | -- Dick Solomon, "3rd Rock from the Sun"
    Jeff Rife, Apr 10, 2005
    #18
  19. Fernando

    Billy Joe Guest

    In ref:

    Bill Turner <> wrote:

    > On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 07:05:29 GMT, Mark Spatny
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Really? Such as? Can you name one, or point me to articles
    >> on the subject? I haven't seen those programs before, and
    >> I'd like to learn more.

    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > CDMaster 32 will do it:
    > http://www.zittware.com/Products/CDMaster32/cdmaster32.html
    >
    > There are probably others.


    Having only read the instructions at the site shown, it appears
    the method is to use WMP to burn an audio disc from a WMA-DRM
    licensed set of files. Then use CDMaster32 to convert the audio
    disk to MP3 or other format.

    If this is the case, then who needs CDM32?? As long as WMP is
    willing to burn audio discs from WMA-DRM files (and I accept the
    site's word for this, never having had such a file here) then
    any old ripper should work, no?

    The question raised, to my mind, would be: what quality is the
    WMP audio burn? Is it a digital copy or is it a sound card
    copy?

    BJ
    Billy Joe, Apr 10, 2005
    #19
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