dvd data failure

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by hartlyuk@yahoo.com, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as a
    disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    others.
    They have scratches on them.
    The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the lost
    files.
    Is there anyway I can access these files again?.
    I cannot believe they have all physically vanished
    I am astounded that these dvd discs are so vunerable to failure due
    to a few scratches.
    Why are the Microsoft programs running on the computer so sensitive

    to a few scratches?.
    One would think they can display files with data 'holes' in them,but
    they just seem to ignore the whole disc if one tiny bit of one data
    track is scratched.
    Grateful for any help ,Hartly.
     
    , Aug 3, 2006
    #1
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  2. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    > They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as
    > a
    > disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    > others.
    > They have scratches on them.


    Why and how? Disks don't come with scratches, so how were they caused?
    The direction of the scratches is also important for your chances of
    recovery.

    Do you have multiple back-ups (I assume not)? You should not put all
    eggs in one basket, but use a certain redundancy in your back-up
    method.
    Best approach is to start at the beginning, and use a first class
    recorder and matching media. Companies like Plextor also provide media
    compatibility data, and their better recorders come with software that
    allows to detect degradation long before the stage of unreadable due
    to aging arrives. Mechanical deterioration effects can be overcome by
    using a non-archive copy as a working disk.

    > The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the
    > lost
    > files.


    Try <http://www.infinadyne.com/cddvd_diagnostic.html> as what may be a
    final resort. The demo will allow you to see what can be recovered,
    you'll then have to purchase it to actually do the recovery.

    > Is there anyway I can access these files again?.


    How much is data worth to you, literally in hard currency? There are
    specialized companies that can come a long way is restoring, although
    mechanical destruction is the hardest kind, and therefore is better
    prevented.

    --
    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Aug 3, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Thanks for quick reply Bart.
    They were scratched by the computer's disc drive,(in public
    library),as they have not been maltreated outside a computer.
    I will try the download you recommednd.
    Thanks.


    Bart van der Wolf wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    > > They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as
    > > a
    > > disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    > > others.
    > > They have scratches on them.

    >
    > Why and how? Disks don't come with scratches, so how were they caused?
    > The direction of the scratches is also important for your chances of
    > recovery.
    >
    > Do you have multiple back-ups (I assume not)? You should not put all
    > eggs in one basket, but use a certain redundancy in your back-up
    > method.
    > Best approach is to start at the beginning, and use a first class
    > recorder and matching media. Companies like Plextor also provide media
    > compatibility data, and their better recorders come with software that
    > allows to detect degradation long before the stage of unreadable due
    > to aging arrives. Mechanical deterioration effects can be overcome by
    > using a non-archive copy as a working disk.
    >
    > > The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the
    > > lost
    > > files.

    >
    > Try <http://www.infinadyne.com/cddvd_diagnostic.html> as what may be a
    > final resort. The demo will allow you to see what can be recovered,
    > you'll then have to purchase it to actually do the recovery.
    >
    > > Is there anyway I can access these files again?.

    >
    > How much is data worth to you, literally in hard currency? There are
    > specialized companies that can come a long way is restoring, although
    > mechanical destruction is the hardest kind, and therefore is better
    > prevented.
    >
    > --
    > Bart
     
    , Aug 3, 2006
    #3
  4. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for quick reply Bart.
    > They were scratched by the computer's disc drive,(in public
    > library),as they have not been maltreated outside a computer.


    Those are the worst type of scratch, while radial ones are of the more
    benign kind.

    --
    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Aug 3, 2006
    #4
  5. Marvin Guest

    wrote:
    > Thanks for quick reply Bart.
    > They were scratched by the computer's disc drive,(in public
    > library),as they have not been maltreated outside a computer.
    > I will try the download you recommednd.
    > Thanks.
    >

    You can also try a scratch remover device, which you can buy
    at computer stores and DVD rental stores. Scratch-resistant
    blank disks are now being sold.

    Have you told the library staff about it? The disc drives
    need cleaning.
     
    Marvin, Aug 3, 2006
    #5
  6. Bill Funk Guest

    On Thu, 03 Aug 2006 14:51:01 -0400, Marvin <>
    wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> Thanks for quick reply Bart.
    >> They were scratched by the computer's disc drive,(in public
    >> library),as they have not been maltreated outside a computer.
    >> I will try the download you recommednd.
    >> Thanks.
    >>

    >You can also try a scratch remover device, which you can buy
    >at computer stores and DVD rental stores. Scratch-resistant
    >blank disks are now being sold.
    >
    >Have you told the library staff about it? The disc drives
    >need cleaning.


    I would think that if the drives did indeed put on sctratches that
    renered the DVDs unreadable, they are junk, and need to be replaced.
    Dirt won't do that, but a head that's misalligned can.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Aug 3, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    Apart from the comments above, also try different dvd drives. I
    recently replaced my drive, and found it could read a couple of dvds I
    had previously given up on.
     
    , Aug 4, 2006
    #7
  8. SimonLW Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    > They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as a
    > disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    > others.
    > They have scratches on them.
    > The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the lost
    > files.
    > Is there anyway I can access these files again?.
    > I cannot believe they have all physically vanished
    > I am astounded that these dvd discs are so vunerable to failure due
    > to a few scratches.
    > Why are the Microsoft programs running on the computer so sensitive
    >
    > to a few scratches?.
    > One would think they can display files with data 'holes' in them,but
    > they just seem to ignore the whole disc if one tiny bit of one data
    > track is scratched.
    > Grateful for any help ,Hartly.
    >

    Buff radially with an automotive paste wax or Novus 2 plastic polish. It
    should remove all but the deeper scratches that will need more buffing. If
    data loss was caused by the scratches, this can restore the readability.
    -S
     
    SimonLW, Aug 4, 2006
    #8
  9. SimonLW Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    > They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as a
    > disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    > others.
    > They have scratches on them.
    > The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the lost
    > files.
    > Is there anyway I can access these files again?.
    > I cannot believe they have all physically vanished
    > I am astounded that these dvd discs are so vunerable to failure due
    > to a few scratches.
    > Why are the Microsoft programs running on the computer so sensitive
    >
    > to a few scratches?.
    > One would think they can display files with data 'holes' in them,but
    > they just seem to ignore the whole disc if one tiny bit of one data
    > track is scratched.
    > Grateful for any help ,Hartly.
    >

    Buff radially with an automotive paste wax or Novus 2 plastic polish. It
    should remove all but the deeper scratches that will need more buffing. If
    data loss was caused by the scratches, this can restore the readability.
    -S
     
    SimonLW, Aug 4, 2006
    #9
  10. Guest

    Thanks for the buffing tip,Simon,and all the other responders.
    Hartly.





    SimonLW wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    > > They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as a
    > > disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    > > others.
    > > They have scratches on them.
    > > The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the lost
    > > files.
    > > Is there anyway I can access these files again?.
    > > I cannot believe they have all physically vanished
    > > I am astounded that these dvd discs are so vunerable to failure due
    > > to a few scratches.
    > > Why are the Microsoft programs running on the computer so sensitive
    > >
    > > to a few scratches?.
    > > One would think they can display files with data 'holes' in them,but
    > > they just seem to ignore the whole disc if one tiny bit of one data
    > > track is scratched.
    > > Grateful for any help ,Hartly.
    > >

    > Buff radially with an automotive paste wax or Novus 2 plastic polish. It
    > should remove all but the deeper scratches that will need more buffing. If
    > data loss was caused by the scratches, this can restore the readability.
    > -S
     
    , Aug 4, 2006
    #10
  11. Xiaoding Guest

    The more data you can put on a disc, the more delicate it is.

    CD's have a protective layer, dvd's do not. I really doubt any
    polishing will help.
     
    Xiaoding, Aug 4, 2006
    #11
  12. Bill Funk Guest

    On 4 Aug 2006 07:04:29 -0700, "Xiaoding" <>
    wrote:

    >The more data you can put on a disc, the more delicate it is.
    >
    >CD's have a protective layer, dvd's do not. I really doubt any
    >polishing will help.


    No, that's backwards.
    In fact, DVDs have an extra layer of polymer that CDs don't have.
    http://www.videointerchange.com/dvd.htm#DVD Construction
    Ijn CDs, that polymer coating is missing; there's just a lacquer
    coating, which is just a place to put a label and offers little
    protection.
    http://www.mfdigital.com/2004/06/cd-construction.html
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Aug 4, 2006
    #12
  13. Guest

    Bill Funk wrote:
    > On 4 Aug 2006 07:04:29 -0700, "Xiaoding" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >The more data you can put on a disc, the more delicate it is.
    > >
    > >CD's have a protective layer, dvd's do not. I really doubt any
    > >polishing will help.

    >
    > No, that's backwards.


    Yes, Bill is correct, DVD's are technically better, but it really
    depends on the scratch resistance of that layer, which is where the
    cheap disks tend to fall down.

    But just for the record I think the worst disks I ever used were some
    cheap 'Princo' CD's - not one of them is readable after 1.5 years. Not
    because of scratches - the data layer has gone a weird yellow colour
    and they are completely unreadable.

    And the polishing bit is backwards too. I have successfully used
    automotive polishes to recover unreadable disks, both cd and dvd, on at
    least 4 occasions in the past. It is most definitely worth a try if
    the scratches are light. Don't use 'heavy cut'!
     
    , Aug 5, 2006
    #13
  14. Xiaoding Guest

    > No, that's backwards.
    > In fact, DVDs have an extra layer of polymer that CDs don't have.
    > http://www.videointerchange.com/dvd.htm#DVD Construction
    > Ijn CDs, that polymer coating is missing; there's just a lacquer
    > coating, which is just a place to put a label and offers little
    > protection.
    > http://www.mfdigital.com/2004/06/cd-construction.html
    > --
    > Bill Funk
    > replace "g" with "a"


    While true, it's still more delicate than a CD. Why are TDK and
    Memorex spending millions to develop better coating technology?
    Because DVD's are prone to failure from scratching. They would'nt be
    spending big bucks if the problem was not there. You can get CD's with
    polymer coating, but CD's are good as is anyways. DVD's are not.
     
    Xiaoding, Aug 7, 2006
    #14
  15. Guest

    Hello again Bart and other responders,

    I downloaded the free infinadyne progr. and it only recovered 7 out
    of c.570 files,BUT when I then clicked on the standard/integral disc
    reading progr. on the computer it was able to read ALL of the 570
    files, and I recovered them all to CDs ,I don't trust DVDs anymore.

    I have since tried to read the DVD again, and the computer cannot
    find any files on it .
    So I was very lucky.
    Very illogical/temperamental these computer systems I think.

    Hartly

    Bart van der Wolf wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I have stored computer data on four dvd+r discs.
    > > They all seem to have failed,that is one is not even recognized as
    > > a
    > > disc by the computer, and half the files have gone missing from the
    > > others.
    > > They have scratches on them.

    >
    > Why and how? Disks don't come with scratches, so how were they caused?
    > The direction of the scratches is also important for your chances of
    > recovery.
    >
    > Do you have multiple back-ups (I assume not)? You should not put all
    > eggs in one basket, but use a certain redundancy in your back-up
    > method.
    > Best approach is to start at the beginning, and use a first class
    > recorder and matching media. Companies like Plextor also provide media
    > compatibility data, and their better recorders come with software that
    > allows to detect degradation long before the stage of unreadable due
    > to aging arrives. Mechanical deterioration effects can be overcome by
    > using a non-archive copy as a working disk.
    >
    > > The free versions of cdroller and isobuster will not recover the
    > > lost
    > > files.

    >
    > Try <http://www.infinadyne.com/cddvd_diagnostic.html> as what may be a
    > final resort. The demo will allow you to see what can be recovered,
    > you'll then have to purchase it to actually do the recovery.
    >
    > > Is there anyway I can access these files again?.

    >
    > How much is data worth to you, literally in hard currency? There are
    > specialized companies that can come a long way is restoring, although
    > mechanical destruction is the hardest kind, and therefore is better
    > prevented.
    >
    > --
    > Bart
     
    , Aug 7, 2006
    #15
  16. Bill Funk Guest

    On 7 Aug 2006 07:00:08 -0700, "Xiaoding" <>
    wrote:

    >> No, that's backwards.
    >> In fact, DVDs have an extra layer of polymer that CDs don't have.
    >> http://www.videointerchange.com/dvd.htm#DVD Construction
    >> Ijn CDs, that polymer coating is missing; there's just a lacquer
    >> coating, which is just a place to put a label and offers little
    >> protection.
    >> http://www.mfdigital.com/2004/06/cd-construction.html
    >> --
    >> Bill Funk
    >> replace "g" with "a"

    >
    >While true, it's still more delicate than a CD. Why are TDK and
    >Memorex spending millions to develop better coating technology?
    >Because DVD's are prone to failure from scratching. They would'nt be
    >spending big bucks if the problem was not there. You can get CD's with
    >polymer coating, but CD's are good as is anyways. DVD's are not.


    No, a DVD isn't more delicate than a CD. On the burning side, it has
    the same protective layer that a CD has, with the added protection of
    another layer on the label side.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Aug 7, 2006
    #16
  17. "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    SNIP
    > No, a DVD isn't more delicate than a CD. On the burning side,
    > it has the same protective layer that a CD has, with the added
    > protection of another layer on the label side.


    However, due to the higher data density, wouldn't it be logical that a
    DVD is more susceptible to optically induced failure caused by
    scratches?

    --
    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Aug 7, 2006
    #17
  18. ASAAR Guest

    On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 07:48:22 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:

    >> While true, it's still more delicate than a CD. Why are TDK and
    >> Memorex spending millions to develop better coating technology?
    >> Because DVD's are prone to failure from scratching. They would'nt be
    >> spending big bucks if the problem was not there. You can get CD's with
    >> polymer coating, but CD's are good as is anyways. DVD's are not.

    >
    > No, a DVD isn't more delicate than a CD. On the burning side, it has
    > the same protective layer that a CD has, with the added protection of
    > another layer on the label side.


    I think that what's meant is that DVDs are more delicate because
    some scratches on them that cause data loss might be tolerated on
    CDs. Data loss on CDs might require deeper or greater numbers of
    scratches.
     
    ASAAR, Aug 7, 2006
    #18
  19. Bill Funk Guest

    On Mon, 7 Aug 2006 19:39:08 +0200, "Bart van der Wolf"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >SNIP
    >> No, a DVD isn't more delicate than a CD. On the burning side,
    >> it has the same protective layer that a CD has, with the added
    >> protection of another layer on the label side.

    >
    >However, due to the higher data density, wouldn't it be logical that a
    >DVD is more susceptible to optically induced failure caused by
    >scratches?


    Possibly, but I've seen no studies that have shown that.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Aug 7, 2006
    #19
  20. Bill Funk Guest

    On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 13:44:24 -0400, ASAAR <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 07:48:22 -0700, Bill Funk wrote:
    >
    >>> While true, it's still more delicate than a CD. Why are TDK and
    >>> Memorex spending millions to develop better coating technology?
    >>> Because DVD's are prone to failure from scratching. They would'nt be
    >>> spending big bucks if the problem was not there. You can get CD's with
    >>> polymer coating, but CD's are good as is anyways. DVD's are not.

    >>
    >> No, a DVD isn't more delicate than a CD. On the burning side, it has
    >> the same protective layer that a CD has, with the added protection of
    >> another layer on the label side.

    >
    > I think that what's meant is that DVDs are more delicate because
    >some scratches on them that cause data loss might be tolerated on
    >CDs. Data loss on CDs might require deeper or greater numbers of
    >scratches.


    Possibly, but, personally, there are too many "mights" there to base
    anything on.
    :)
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Aug 7, 2006
    #20
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