DVD Cabling Hookup Quest. ?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Robert11, May 27, 2004.

  1. Robert11

    Robert11 Guest

    Hello:

    Not too sharp with this stuff.

    Just got a new Panasonic DVD player (my very first) and hooked it up to my
    Panasonic
    TV. Works fine, no problems.

    But, I see there are actually two suggested methods for
    the hookup one can use. They aren't too clear about things in their manual.

    Funny, they spend a zillion bucks on their R&D, but can't hire someone who
    actually
    knows how to write a good, useful, easy to use manual.

    Anyway: the way I have it hooked up now is with two lines for the audio,
    and all the video signal
    on the one other line. This uses the cable they provided. Pretty good pix.

    The other way is apparently with 2 lines for the audio, as before, but 3
    separate lines for the video.
    This would require my going to R/S for another cable, I guess.

    Is this method "significantly" better than the first, in providing a
    superior
    picture quality ? Worth doing ? Caveats ?

    BTW: Can one take the output from a DVD and record it on a VCR ?
    Legal (in any cases ?) ?

    Thanks,
    Bob
    Robert11, May 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. Robert11 wrote:
    > Anyway: the way I have it hooked up now is with two lines for the audio,
    > and all the video signal
    > on the one other line. This uses the cable they provided. Pretty good pix.
    >


    This would be composite video, the second-worst picture you can get out
    of your DVD player. The absolute worst would be to run your composite
    signal through a demodulator for display on a tv that only has a
    screw-in coax input, but all modern tvs have at least a composite input.

    > The other way is apparently with 2 lines for the audio, as before, but 3
    > separate lines for the video.
    > This would require my going to R/S for another cable, I guess.
    >
    > Is this method "significantly" better than the first, in providing a
    > superior
    > picture quality ? Worth doing ? Caveats ?
    >


    You're talking about component video, and it is absolutely worth doing,
    DVD is the first consumer format to allow us to use component video and
    it's awesomely clear and detailed, you would have to get an HDTV to have
    a better picture. HOWEVER, you need a tv that has component inputs.
    Does your tv have red, green, and blue inputs on the back? (Are you in
    the US, Canada, or somewhere else?) You'll also need to buy new
    component cables (don't let the salespeople push the expensive Monster
    brand or any kind of gold-plated cables on you, YOU DO NOT NEED THESE),
    but cheap component cables from Wal-Mart. As long as they seem thick
    and sturdy, they should be fine, no matter the price. And you won't
    need new audio cables, you can still use the ones you're already using.

    A few notches in quality below component is S-Video, which uses a
    connector that looks like the one your mouse and keyboard on your
    computer use. My tv only has one component input, so I use that for my
    DVD player and my S-Video input for my game systems. I can definitely
    tell the difference between the two, others say there is only a little
    difference. In any case they are both head and shoulders above
    composite. If your tv does not have a component input then get an
    S-Video one. You can still use the two audio cables you were using
    before, just don't connect the yellow composite jacks. S-Video just
    carries the video signal, like component.

    Aaaaand, using the highest quality connection won't do you a heck of a
    lot of good if your tv isn't properly calibrated. Ya see, your tv comes
    out of the box with the contrast, brightness, color, etc. all way out of
    proportion. It not only gives you an inferior picture but it also
    decrease the lifespan of your tv. Buy a good calibration disc (not the
    THX Optimizer), like Digital Video Essentials (the latest in a series
    which goes back to A Video Standard, the first calibration LD in 1989),
    which I bought for 17 bucks at www.deepdiscountdvd.com, and I wouldn't
    be without it. It even comes with a three-colored gel insert for proper
    color calibration. The only downside is the menu interface leaves
    something to be desired if you're trying to access specific test
    patterns, but for the most part it talks you through everything,
    explaining what each setting is and how to correct it. Once you
    calibrate your tv properly it may seem a little dark to you at first (do
    all your tv viewing in the dimmest light possible, but not total
    darkness, as this is how your tv was meant to be viewed).

    You'll calibrate at least once a year, as these settings will slowly
    drift. One day when you upgrade to a big ol' HDTV, you should consider
    having a pro calibrate it, as they can access settings we consumers
    can't, with special codes.

    Even if your tv just has composite inputs, you should still get a
    calibration disc like DVE, it will still help you get the best possible
    picture.

    > BTW: Can one take the output from a DVD and record it on a VCR ?
    > Legal (in any cases ?) ?


    No, everybody who buys a DVD player attempting to record DVDs to VHS
    always winds up dissapointed. And it isn't legal, either.

    I know I said a lot here, and I hope you read it all and took it
    seriously. Audio and video are just much more complex then the old days
    when you connected an antenna and that was it. Aren't you glad I didn't
    mention upgrading to a 5.1 audio system? :-D

    --
    "Hey, I bet people will buy my ugly shirts if I put my name on them."
    --Tommy Hilfiger

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
    Grand Inquisitor, May 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. Robert11 wrote:

    > Is this method "significantly" better than the first, in providing a
    > superior
    > picture quality ? Worth doing ? Caveats ?


    Most likely component video, and yes if you tv has
    component ins the quality will blow away anything
    you're used to and even more so when you kick on
    progressive scan.


    drc :)
    Darrel Christenson, May 27, 2004
    #3
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