DVD and CD ROT: Out of the closet, at last!

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by One-Shot Scot, May 11, 2004.

  1. One-Shot Scot

    Stan Brown Guest

    "LASERandDVDfan" <> wrote in alt.video.dvd:
    >Remember, though. Even the best CD-Rs are vulnerable to damage from excessive
    >heat and UV exposure. They're merely more able to take the punishment much
    >better than cheapies. But, as a precaution, still do your best to protect
    >CD-Rs from any such exposure. - Reinhart


    Well, I do. I can't imagine ever setting one down naked on a surface
    as several people have described. They always go right from the case
    to the player and then back again. I store the cases on edge, I
    handle the discs by the edge only, and so forth -- "like records",
    as someone else said.

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    DVD FAQ: http://dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
    other FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/genl/faqget.htm
     
    Stan Brown, May 15, 2004
    #41
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  2. >Well, I do. I can't imagine ever setting one down naked on a surface
    >as several people have described.


    Unfortunately, I've seen this done by other people way too common, particularly
    by youths. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, May 15, 2004
    #42
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  3. One-Shot Scot

    Me Again Guest

    On Tue, 11 May 2004 07:12:23 -0700, "One-Shot Scot" <>
    wrote:

    >Some in this newsgroup who have not experienced DVD rot continue to
    >ridicule and belittle those who have. My first rotted disk was
    >_Cabaret_, which failed to play only 4 months after I bought it in 1998.
    >Other rotted titles followed, and I reported all of them. Other people
    >reported that they too had experienced DVD Rot, but for the most part,
    >all of us were quickly dismissed as crackpots.


    The article says "DVD rot" occurs on DVDs that are poorly manufactured
    or (more commonly) not taken care of:
    -----
    The aluminum layer that reflects the light of the player's laser is
    separated from the CD label by a thin layer of lacquer. If the
    manufacturer applied the lacquer improperly, air can penetrate to
    oxidize the aluminum, eating it up much like iron rusts in air.

    But in Hartke's view, it's more common that discs are rendered
    unreadable by poor handling by the owner.

    "If people treat these discs rather harshly, or stack them, or allow
    them to rub against each other, this very fragile protective layer can
    be disturbed, allowing the atmosphere to interact with that aluminum,"
    he says.
    -----
     
    Me Again, May 16, 2004
    #43
  4. >The article says "DVD rot" occurs on DVDs that are poorly manufactured
    >or (more commonly) not taken care of:


    The part of the article that made sense was the part that had an expert's
    quote.
    The rest of the article, on the other hand, was sensationalized journalism that
    didn't point out facts, but merely spewed out improbable possibilities backed
    by evidence of questionable value. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, May 16, 2004
    #44
  5. One-Shot Scot

    Don Leighty Guest

    This pinhole thing was debunked way back in the 1980s. When I first
    heard about it, I started checking all new CDs I bought and - guess
    what? - they all had pinholes to one degree or another. I've examined
    my twenty-year-old discs at intervals and can see no change over time.

    The pinhole effect is said to be caused by the aluminum coating not
    completely covering the polycarbonate substrate when it is applied.
    There's a slight loss of data at the dropout point, but redundancy
    allows the player to completely reconstruct the original signal.

    Disc rot does exist, though. I've had to replace dozens of discs that
    either turned coppery-colored (CDs pressed in the UK By PDO), or whose
    labels turned sticky to the degree that they became little circular
    strips of flypaper before eventually peeling off (a Nimbus plant
    problem that I've seen virtually nothing about in print). I've also
    had discs develop a mildewy-like surface rot that made them look like
    a frost-covered window pane on a winter morning.

    Thankfully, the total of affected discs is still under 100.
    Nonetheless, the long-term health of my investment in a music library
    is a worry. The same people who were telling me that the discs would
    last forever also were telling me that CDs conveyed perfect sound
    quality. Obviously, their tune has changed, now that new products
    have arrived that really provide perfect sound.

    ---
    Best Wishes,
    Don Leighty

    "Turn me on, Redmond. Turn me on, Redmond."
     
    Don Leighty, May 19, 2004
    #45

  6. > I've also
    >had discs develop a mildewy-like surface rot that made them look like
    >a frost-covered window pane on a winter morning.


    I bought one disc that was like that brand new and did an exchange. It was the
    older issue "Total Recall" soundtrack from Varese Sarabande, replicated by JVC.

    >Nonetheless, the long-term health of my investment in a music library
    >is a worry.


    I don't think you may have much to worry about. If your discs are more than a
    few years old and are still perfect, they will likely stay that way for quite a
    few years unless they get damaged to the point where the disc is internally
    compromised.

    My bigger concern is whether or not functional players will still be around
    within the next couple of decades.

    >The same people who were telling me that the discs would
    >last forever also were telling me that CDs conveyed perfect sound
    >quality.


    Technically, CDs are capable of that within a human's typical range of hearing.


    On execution, you can have multiple variables that can affect the sound
    quality. Digital audio is typically unforgiving to any errors in the original
    recording. Also, many CD players can have decent D/A stages but horrible
    analogue stages, including some fairly high end equipment. This is where
    someone can really benefit from a premium CD player like a higher end Sony ES
    (not the lower scale ES components, which seem almost as bad as consumer Sony
    CD players in terms of sound quality from the likes of "Best Buy"), a Meridian,
    a McIntosh, a Theta Delta transport with a Krell outboard D/A or many other
    examples of audiophile grade CD players. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, May 19, 2004
    #46
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