Dutch Films?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by DVDfanatico, Jul 22, 2004.

  1. DVDfanatico

    DVDfanatico Guest

    Are there Dutch films in the Dutch language (any region) people would
    recommend? Any opinions on the Paul Verhoeven Collection by Anchor Bay?

    Thanks
    -DVDfanatico
     
    DVDfanatico, Jul 22, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. DVDfanatico

    Menno Guest

    DVDfanatico wrote:
    > Are there Dutch films in the Dutch language (any region) people would
    > recommend? Any opinions on the Paul Verhoeven Collection by Anchor
    > Bay?
    >
    > Thanks
    > -DVDfanatico


    That Paul Verhoeven Collection contains 4 movies that are certainly worth
    watching. I recently got Business is Business (= "Wat zien ik" van Appie Mol
    voor de Nederlanders onder ons) from a videostore in Ottawa (Canada). It was
    fun to see that one again. It's the oldest of the four. I've seen the other
    ones in the movie theaters when they were playing in the Netherlands. I hope
    Anchor Bay didn't censor them as there's a bit of nudity in it. Not unusual
    in Dutch movies but North-Americans (US & Canada) seem to be scared by
    nudity despite all their stripclubs :)

    Other Dutch movies that I enjoyed are:
    - "Flodder", "Flodder in America" is the same theme done again and thereby
    less interesting.
    - "Schatjes" (sweeties/honeys/), again the 2nd episode "Mama is boos" is
    less interesting.
    - "Amsterdamned",
    - "Grijpstra en de Gier"
    - "Naakt over de schutting" (Naked over the fence),
    - "De inbreker" (the burgler),
    These are mostly entertaining films, just fun

    The following ones are a bit more artsy (sp?),
    - "Abel" (= name, therefore no translation)
    - "De jurk" (the dress),
    - "De onfatsoenlijke vrouw" (the indecent woman),
    - "Antonia's line"
    - "De aanslag" (the assault), haven't seen this one myself but it got good
    reviews at the time.
    - "The discovery of heaven" is a Dutch production although recorded in
    English.
    - "Karakter" (character)

    Check out: http://www.nederlandsespeelfilm.nl for more titles and
    http://dvd.pagina.nl/ for mail order shops. It's in Dutch but since you're
    asking for films in the Dutch language, you seem to be able to understand
    that.

    Menno
     
    Menno, Jul 22, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. DVDfanatico

    G. M. Watson Guest

    ----------
    In article <>,
    (DVDfanatico) wrote:


    > Are there Dutch films in the Dutch language (any region) people would
    > recommend? Any opinions on the Paul Verhoeven Collection by Anchor Bay?
    >
    > Thanks
    > -DVDfanatico


    A Dutch director worth knowing about is Alex van Warmerdam, who's made about
    half a dozen films since the mid-80s. I've only seen two of his films--
    "Little Tony" (aka "Kleine Teun"), from 1998, set in an isolated Dutch
    farmhouse; and "Grimm", released in 2003 and set and shot mostly in Spain.
    Van Warmerdam has one of the most competely nutty senses of humor I've ever
    encountered in a director. It's a very black, Dutch sort of humor, though.
    "Little Tony" concerns a rather grotesque middle-aged Dutch farming couple
    who manage to become parents.The illiterate "father" (played by van
    Warmerdam) is pushed by his wife to learn to read and write and to this end
    they retain the services of a tutor, played by the delectable Ariane
    Schluter (co-star of the phone-sex drama "1-900", also one of the best Dutch
    films of recent years). She moves in, sexual (and other) tensions arise,
    wackiness and violence ensue. This film has a sort of controlled, hilarious
    madness that makes it an altogether bizarre-- yet rewarding-- experience to
    watch.

    "Grimm" I found disappointing, although it's still well worth seeing. The
    title hints at the content; the film starts out as pretty much of a modern
    Grimm's fairy tale. A brother and sister in their early 20s are taken into
    the deep dark forest by their wacked-out father (another van Warmerdam crazy
    farmer) and abandoned there, as the parents can't afford to feed them. A
    series of bizarre adventures ensues, which eventually sees the hapless pair
    fetch up in Spain, where a wealthy Spaniard falls for the sister and moves
    her (and, reluctantly, her brother) in at his estate in the country. After
    that, things just keep on being... strange, in a Spanish/Dutch gothic sort
    of way. I found the Netherlands-set portion of the film to be extrmely funny
    in van Warmerdam's loony style, but once his characters arrive in Spain,
    both he and they seem a bit like fish out of water, and the
    spaghetti-western sort-of-hommage which dominates the latter part of the
    film doesn't work very well, I think. Van Warmerdam's films seem to need
    those austere Dutch settings in order to be at their best. But like I say,
    "Grimm" is still well worth seeing, even so.

    I have no idea if either of these films is available on DVD (they probably
    are in Europe-- they were both distributed theatrically by the
    Netherlands-based Fortissimo Film Sales, for what that's worth-- I caught
    them at film festivals), but now you can have the fun of looking. Good luck.
    GMW
     
    G. M. Watson, Jul 22, 2004
    #3
  4. DVDfanatico

    Haans Guest

    "G. M. Watson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > ----------
    > In article <>,
    > (DVDfanatico) wrote:
    >
    >
    > > Are there Dutch films in the Dutch language (any region) people would
    > > recommend? Any opinions on the Paul Verhoeven Collection by Anchor Bay?
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > > -DVDfanatico

    >
    > A Dutch director worth knowing about is Alex van Warmerdam, who's made

    about
    > half a dozen films since the mid-80s. I've only seen two of his films--
    > "Little Tony" (aka "Kleine Teun"), from 1998, set in an isolated Dutch
    > farmhouse; and "Grimm", released in 2003 and set and shot mostly in Spain.
    > Van Warmerdam has one of the most competely nutty senses of humor I've

    ever
    > encountered in a director. It's a very black, Dutch sort of humor, though.
    > "Little Tony" concerns a rather grotesque middle-aged Dutch farming couple
    > who manage to become parents.The illiterate "father" (played by van
    > Warmerdam) is pushed by his wife to learn to read and write and to this

    end
    > they retain the services of a tutor, played by the delectable Ariane
    > Schluter (co-star of the phone-sex drama "1-900", also one of the best

    Dutch
    > films of recent years). She moves in, sexual (and other) tensions arise,
    > wackiness and violence ensue. This film has a sort of controlled,

    hilarious
    > madness that makes it an altogether bizarre-- yet rewarding-- experience

    to
    > watch.
    >
    > "Grimm" I found disappointing, although it's still well worth seeing. The
    > title hints at the content; the film starts out as pretty much of a modern
    > Grimm's fairy tale. A brother and sister in their early 20s are taken into
    > the deep dark forest by their wacked-out father (another van Warmerdam

    crazy
    > farmer) and abandoned there, as the parents can't afford to feed them. A
    > series of bizarre adventures ensues, which eventually sees the hapless

    pair
    > fetch up in Spain, where a wealthy Spaniard falls for the sister and moves
    > her (and, reluctantly, her brother) in at his estate in the country. After
    > that, things just keep on being... strange, in a Spanish/Dutch gothic sort
    > of way. I found the Netherlands-set portion of the film to be extrmely

    funny
    > in van Warmerdam's loony style, but once his characters arrive in Spain,
    > both he and they seem a bit like fish out of water, and the
    > spaghetti-western sort-of-hommage which dominates the latter part of the
    > film doesn't work very well, I think. Van Warmerdam's films seem to need
    > those austere Dutch settings in order to be at their best. But like I say,
    > "Grimm" is still well worth seeing, even so.
    >
    > I have no idea if either of these films is available on DVD (they probably
    > are in Europe-- they were both distributed theatrically by the
    > Netherlands-based Fortissimo Film Sales, for what that's worth-- I caught
    > them at film festivals), but now you can have the fun of looking. Good

    luck.
    > GMW


    As a Warmerdam fan, I've tried to track down his films on DVD to no avail.
    My main wants are "The Northerners" (De Noorderlingen) and "The Dress" (De
    Jurk) and both are unavailable (as most of his films). They are both great,
    the former being absolutely fabulous! If you can get these on rental-video,
    they're well worth a watch!
     
    Haans, Jul 23, 2004
    #4
  5. About Dutch films

    Dutch films as mentioned in the other posts sound to me as an excellent
    choice. The industry was more or less non-existent until the late seventies
    beginning of the 80's, if you're considering storytelling films. Maybe with
    the exception of the directorsduo Wim Verstappen (who died today, 24/7/04,
    or 7/24/04) & Pim de la Parra. In the '60's & early 70's they made
    low/no-budget films that, you could say, marked the transition of our
    comparatively traditionalist society to the liberal society some us claim we
    are. Their best known film is Blue Movie, a very rightly chosen title, about
    'daily life' in a then modern part of Amsterdam in that period. Films of the
    period featured lots of very pink bodies doing things that made you think
    different about the beauty of sex in general and the need for it in movies
    in particular.

    Their films are ten years or less apart from those of the one director I
    would care to mention: Bert Haanstra, who made (mostly b&w) documentary
    style films about Dutch society. I think they are beautifully photographed
    and tell with a little irony about a society almost no modern Dutchman can
    relate to, even when they lived in it. Nice contrast to something like Blue
    Movie... De Stem van Water (the sound/voice/.. of water), Spiegel van
    Holland (Holland in a mirror, awardwinning movie of Dutch cities seen
    in/from the water), Zoo (candidcamera observations in a zoo), Alleman
    (Everyman, the general way of life of the ordinary dutch) were some of them.

    I've seen a lot of these titles on VHS on sale (though in PAL) but I can
    imagine them being put on DVD. Maybe it's an idea to look around or ask at
    the filmmuseum in Amsterdam (www.filmmuseum.nl), where they are generally
    speaking quick to response. If that doesn't help then I would be willing to
    go to a art-house theatre here, where as far a I know they should know if
    they are on sale or going to be on sale. If you're interested, send me an
    email but be sure to include in the Subject something that doesn't make me
    throw it away as just one of the umpty spam-mails I receive.

    Good luck,

    Paul Malherbe

    "DVDfanatico" <> schreef in bericht
    news:...
    > Are there Dutch films in the Dutch language (any region) people would
    > recommend? Any opinions on the Paul Verhoeven Collection by Anchor Bay?
    >
    > Thanks
    > -DVDfanatico
     
    Paul Malherbe, Jul 24, 2004
    #5
  6. DVDfanatico

    DVDfanatico Guest

    I'm sorry to hear that director Wim Verstappen died.

    Thank you for the information and to the other posters for their
    recommendations and links.

    -DVDfanatico

    >"Paul Malherbe"
    >Date: 7/24/2004 12:12 PM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <4102b4dc$0$1729$>


    >About Dutch films
    >
    >Dutch films as mentioned in the other posts sound to me as an excellent
    >choice. The industry was more or less non-existent until the late seventies
    >beginning of the 80's, if you're considering storytelling films. Maybe with
    >the exception of the directorsduo Wim Verstappen (who died today, 24/7/04,
    >or 7/24/04) & Pim de la Parra. In the '60's & early 70's they made
    >low/no-budget films that, you could say, marked the transition of our
    >comparatively traditionalist society to the liberal society some us claim we
    >are. Their best known film is Blue Movie, a very rightly chosen title, about
    >'daily life' in a then modern part of Amsterdam in that period. Films of the
    >period featured lots of very pink bodies doing things that made you think
    >different about the beauty of sex in general and the need for it in movies
    >in particular.
    >
    >Their films are ten years or less apart from those of the one director I
    >would care to mention: Bert Haanstra, who made (mostly b&w) documentary
    >style films about Dutch society. I think they are beautifully photographed
    >and tell with a little irony about a society almost no modern Dutchman can
    >relate to, even when they lived in it. Nice contrast to something like Blue
    >Movie... De Stem van Water (the sound/voice/.. of water), Spiegel van
    >Holland (Holland in a mirror, awardwinning movie of Dutch cities seen
    >in/from the water), Zoo (candidcamera observations in a zoo), Alleman
    >(Everyman, the general way of life of the ordinary dutch) were some of them.
    >
    >I've seen a lot of these titles on VHS on sale (though in PAL) but I can
    >imagine them being put on DVD. Maybe it's an idea to look around or ask at
    >the filmmuseum in Amsterdam (www.filmmuseum.nl), where they are generally
    >speaking quick to response. If that doesn't help then I would be willing to
    >go to a art-house theatre here, where as far a I know they should know if
    >they are on sale or going to be on sale. If you're interested, send me an
    >email but be sure to include in the Subject something that doesn't make me
    >throw it away as just one of the umpty spam-mails I receive.
    >
    >Good luck,
    >
    >Paul Malherbe
    >
    >"DVDfanatico" <> schreef in bericht
    >news:...
    >> Are there Dutch films in the Dutch language (any region) people would
    >> recommend? Any opinions on the Paul Verhoeven Collection by Anchor Bay?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> -DVDfanatico
     
    DVDfanatico, Jul 25, 2004
    #6
  7. You can't go wrong with Verhoeven. SOLDIER OF ORANGE, TURKISH DELIGHT, and
    SPETTERS are all fantastic.

    SPOORLOOS, aka THE VANISHING, is another classic.

    Jan Kounen is a very good Dutch director, although I don't think any of his
    films are in R1 yet (and BLUEBERRY is out in theatres still).
     
    Vlvetmorning98, Jul 26, 2004
    #7
  8. "Vlvetmorning98" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You can't go wrong with Verhoeven. SOLDIER OF ORANGE, TURKISH

    DELIGHT, and
    > SPETTERS are all fantastic.
    >
    > SPOORLOOS, aka THE VANISHING, is another classic.
    >
    > Jan Kounen is a very good Dutch director, although I don't think any

    of his
    > films are in R1 yet (and BLUEBERRY is out in theatres still).



    "Soldier of Orange" is availlable from Amazon.com in both DVD and book
    form, just checked.
    Hubert.
     
    Hubert Borrmann, Jul 26, 2004
    #8
  9. DVDfanatico

    Zimn Guest

    "Paul Malherbe" <> wrote in message news:<4102b4dc$0$1729$>...
    > About Dutch films
    >
    > Dutch films as mentioned in the other posts sound to me as an excellent
    > choice. The industry was more or less non-existent until the late seventies
    > beginning of the 80's, if you're considering storytelling films. Maybe with
    > the exception of the directorsduo Wim Verstappen (who died today, 24/7/04,
    > or 7/24/04) & Pim de la Parra. In the '60's & early 70's they made
    > low/no-budget films that, you could say, marked the transition of our
    > comparatively traditionalist society to the liberal society some us claim we
    > are. Their best known film is Blue Movie, a very rightly chosen title, about
    > 'daily life' in a then modern part of Amsterdam in that period. Films of the
    > period featured lots of very pink bodies doing things that made you think
    > different about the beauty of sex in general and the need for it in movies
    > in particular.



    this is true. for many years, documentaries were practically the only
    films being made in the Netherlands. The Dutch New Wave that began in
    the late 60's and went on for about a decade produced many notable
    films.

    Nouchka van Brakel is a very well-known female director from the
    Netherlands, and made "The Debut" in 1977.

    Adriaan Ditvoorst's "The Blind Photographer"

    Pim and Wim's "Dakota" and "Alicia"

    short animated films: "The Killing of an Egg", "Butterfly R.I.P.",
    "Brainwash", "The Flowers"
     
    Zimn, Aug 1, 2004
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Walkie

    Blaster Worm And Dutch WindowsXP users

    Walkie, Aug 13, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    451
    Boomer
    Aug 13, 2003
  2. dvanleeuwarden

    Is this all Double Dutch for You?

    dvanleeuwarden, Jun 5, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    416
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=
    Jun 5, 2004
  3. Randy Meisters

    uitlegin nederlands (dutch)

    Randy Meisters, Jan 7, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    477
    SgtMinor
    Jan 7, 2005
  4. Randy Meisters

    instructions from newsgroep in dutch

    Randy Meisters, Jan 7, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,503
    Aunt Agatha
    Jan 7, 2005
  5. Dutch or Belgian films

    , Sep 9, 2005, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    416
    kaboom
    Sep 9, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page