Dust!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jmc, Jul 22, 2007.

  1. jmc

    jmc Guest

    I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly
    visible through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned
    the mirror, but the dust is still there.

    How do I clean it off? I don't have any compressed air, and wasn't sure
    anyway whether that's safe to blow into my camera's innards anyway.

    Thanks for any help.

    jmc
     
    jmc, Jul 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. "jmc" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly visible
    >through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned the mirror,
    >but the dust is still there.


    The dust will be on the focussing screen (just above the mirror, facing
    downwards)

    Cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk
     
    Adrian Boliston, Jul 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. jmc

    jmc Guest

    Suddenly, without warning, Adrian Boliston exclaimed (7/22/2007 8:44 PM):
    > "jmc" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly visible
    >> through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned the mirror,
    >> but the dust is still there.

    >
    > The dust will be on the focussing screen (just above the mirror, facing
    > downwards)
    >
    > Cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk
    >
    >


    Thank you. I feel like a victim in a thriller: "look UP!" :)

    Is canned air the best way to clean the innards? It was really hard,
    even with my small hands, to clear the dust off of that screen.

    jmc
     
    jmc, Jul 22, 2007
    #3
  4. jmc

    Roy G Guest

    "jmc" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly visible
    >through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned the mirror,
    >but the dust is still there.
    >
    > How do I clean it off? I don't have any compressed air, and wasn't sure
    > anyway whether that's safe to blow into my camera's innards anyway.
    >
    > Thanks for any help.
    >
    > jmc


    Hi.

    As I said in a slightly earlier thread, Mirror cleaning is something which
    should only ever be done once or twice in a lifetime (yours not the
    camera's).

    These Mirrors are surface silvered, and the least thing can cause permanent
    scratches.

    If the dust is moderate, and does not obstruct your VF view of the Image,
    and does not appear on the Image itself, just ignore it.

    If great black lumps show in the VF, and a quick rub with a CLEAN lens brush
    or wipe on the underside of the Fresnel Screen, (above the mirror), does not
    get rid of them, then they are inside the VF optics and that will require a
    visit to the Service Centre.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Jul 22, 2007
    #4
  5. "jmc" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Is canned air the best way to clean the innards? It was really hard, even
    > with my small hands, to clear the dust off of that screen.


    I get the odd annoying bit of dust on the focussing screen, but have used a
    small microfibre lens cloth to shift it, but it does not seem to get rid of
    the very tiny specks, but they don't worry me too much. I usually carry a
    giotto rocket blower which shifts larger bits of dust before resorting to a
    cloth. With canned air I would worry about blowing propellant onto the
    screen, but some canned airs are better than others I understand.
     
    Adrian Boliston, Jul 22, 2007
    #5
  6. jmc

    Jim Townsend Guest

    jmc wrote:

    > Suddenly, without warning, Adrian Boliston exclaimed (7/22/2007 8:44 PM):
    >> The dust will be on the focussing screen (just above the mirror, facing
    >> downwards)



    > Thank you. I feel like a victim in a thriller: "look UP!" :)
    >
    > Is canned air the best way to clean the innards? It was really hard,
    > even with my small hands, to clear the dust off of that screen.


    You have to be careful with canned air. The propellent sometimes comes out
    as spatters of liquid. This liquid can leave residue marks on your mirror,
    sensor and focus screen.

    Best bet is to use one of those squeeze bulbs. The rocket blower is popular
    because of the pressure it generates.

    Note that you don't want to use too much pressure when blowing on the screen
    and in the mirror box because you can force the dust up on top of the focus
    screen. If that happens, you have to take the screen out of the camera to get
    the dust off.
     
    Jim Townsend, Jul 22, 2007
    #6
  7. jmc

    tomm42 Guest

    On Jul 22, 7:40 am, jmc <> wrote:
    > Suddenly, without warning, Adrian Boliston exclaimed (7/22/2007 8:44 PM):
    >
    > > "jmc" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...

    >
    > >> I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly visible
    > >> through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned the mirror,
    > >> but the dust is still there.

    >
    > > The dust will be on the focussing screen (just above the mirror, facing
    > > downwards)

    >
    > > Cheers adrianwww.boliston.co.uk

    >
    > Thank you. I feel like a victim in a thriller: "look UP!" :)
    >
    > Is canned air the best way to clean the innards? It was really hard,
    > even with my small hands, to clear the dust off of that screen.
    >
    > jmc



    Never use canned air, the propellant is nasty and difficult to remove,
    the mirror should not be touched with anything, very delicate. Use a
    Rocket Blower or an ear syringe from the drugstore, the disadvantage
    of the latter is the inhale the dust, and after a while you are
    blowing dust around. Dust in the viewfinder is more annoying than a
    true problem. But if you have dust there shoot a few pics of the sky
    at f16, see if you have dust on the AA filter that covers the sensor.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jul 23, 2007
    #7
  8. jmc

    tomm42 Guest

    On Jul 22, 7:40 am, jmc <> wrote:
    > Suddenly, without warning, Adrian Boliston exclaimed (7/22/2007 8:44 PM):
    >
    > > "jmc" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...

    >
    > >> I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly visible
    > >> through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned the mirror,
    > >> but the dust is still there.

    >
    > > The dust will be on the focussing screen (just above the mirror, facing
    > > downwards)

    >
    > > Cheers adrianwww.boliston.co.uk

    >
    > Thank you. I feel like a victim in a thriller: "look UP!" :)
    >
    > Is canned air the best way to clean the innards? It was really hard,
    > even with my small hands, to clear the dust off of that screen.
    >
    > jmc



    Never use canned air, the propellant is nasty and difficult to remove,
    the mirror should not be touched with anything, very delicate. Use a
    Rocket Blower or an ear syringe from the drugstore, the disadvantage
    of the latter is the inhale the dust, and after a while you are
    blowing dust around. Dust in the viewfinder is more annoying than a
    true problem. But if you have dust there shoot a few pics of the sky
    at f16, see if you have dust on the AA filter that covers the sensor.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jul 23, 2007
    #8
  9. jmc

    Savageduck Guest

    jmc wrote:
    > I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly
    > visible through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned
    > the mirror, but the dust is still there.
    >
    > How do I clean it off? I don't have any compressed air, and wasn't sure
    > anyway whether that's safe to blow into my camera's innards anyway.
    >
    > Thanks for any help.
    >
    > jmc

    Do not concern yourself with dust that is visible through the
    viewfinder. Under NO circumstances use canned compressed air inside the
    mirror chamber. Only use a squeeze bulb type blower such as a Giotto
    Rocket or dedicated chamber brushes.

    Your major problem will be dust on the low pass filter protecting the
    sensor (the sensor itself is never directly exposed to dust.) This you
    will discover when you find dust spots in large fields of color such as
    sky. These spots can be fixed in post processing with PhotoShop, but can
    become a real pain and all you can do is clean the low pass filter. Here
    go to your camera manual and follow instructions to lock the mirror up
    and expose the sensor. usually a sensor brush will solve the problem.
    (never use the same brush you use for cleaning the chamber, and always
    blow the brush off with a blower or compressed air first. NEVER TOUCH
    the bristles with fingers to leave grease.) Take care not to move
    shutter grease onto the low pass filter.

    Sometimes dust on the low pass filter (the protective glass in front of
    the sensor) is fixed and cannot be moved with a brush. Here is when you
    will have to resort to a wet cleaning technique. Just use the right
    tools. Even so you might have to repeat several times to remove really
    persistent spots.
    You might need to check and clean your lenses and any filters you might
    be using for spots.

    Anyway here are a few URLs for cleaning tools and information.


    http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/
    http://www.photosol.com/
    http://www.kinetronics.com/
    http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/eclipse.html
    https://www.micro-tools.com/store/home.aspx
    http://www.visibledust.com/products.php

    Good luck,
    'Duck
     
    Savageduck, Jul 25, 2007
    #9
  10. jmc

    X-Man Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 19:54:47 -0700, Savageduck <> wrote:

    >jmc wrote:
    >> I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTi (EOS 400D). There's dust clearly
    >> visible through the viewfinder, even with the lens off. I've cleaned
    >> the mirror, but the dust is still there.
    >>
    >> How do I clean it off? I don't have any compressed air, and wasn't sure
    >> anyway whether that's safe to blow into my camera's innards anyway.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any help.
    >>
    >> jmc

    >Do not concern yourself with dust that is visible through the
    >viewfinder. Under NO circumstances use canned compressed air inside the
    >mirror chamber. Only use a squeeze bulb type blower such as a Giotto
    >Rocket or dedicated chamber brushes.
    >
    >Your major problem will be dust on the low pass filter protecting the
    >sensor (the sensor itself is never directly exposed to dust.) This you
    >will discover when you find dust spots in large fields of color such as
    >sky. These spots can be fixed in post processing with PhotoShop, but can
    >become a real pain and all you can do is clean the low pass filter. Here
    >go to your camera manual and follow instructions to lock the mirror up
    >and expose the sensor. usually a sensor brush will solve the problem.
    >(never use the same brush you use for cleaning the chamber, and always
    >blow the brush off with a blower or compressed air first. NEVER TOUCH
    >the bristles with fingers to leave grease.) Take care not to move
    >shutter grease onto the low pass filter.
    >
    >Sometimes dust on the low pass filter (the protective glass in front of
    >the sensor) is fixed and cannot be moved with a brush. Here is when you
    >will have to resort to a wet cleaning technique. Just use the right
    >tools. Even so you might have to repeat several times to remove really
    >persistent spots.
    >You might need to check and clean your lenses and any filters you might
    >be using for spots.
    >
    >Anyway here are a few URLs for cleaning tools and information.
    >
    >
    >http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/
    >http://www.photosol.com/
    >http://www.kinetronics.com/
    >http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/eclipse.html
    >https://www.micro-tools.com/store/home.aspx
    >http://www.visibledust.com/products.php
    >
    >Good luck,
    >'Duck


    LOL!!!!!!!!!!! Yeah, don't worry about all that nasty dust that's cluttering up
    your viewfinder's image and will eventually move around to new places and get
    all over your sensor again or behind the focusing screen or crammed into the
    heart of your camera. Anyone who buys and owns a DSLR has learned to live with
    all that dust in your viewfinder and on the sensor and ruining all your photos
    as PERFECTLY NORMAL! LOL!!!!!!!!!!! To them it's like a fine patina on an
    antique! That layer of grit and dust is something to cherish and admire! It
    gives all their photos character! They would NEVER let something like dust all
    over every part of their image and view dissuade them from buying yet another
    "DLSR Hoover" vacuum cleaner. Just empty out the bag of dust in your DSLR every
    week and don't worry about what you left behind! And be careful to not touch
    that remarkable layer of dust plastered all over the mirror or you'll
    permanently ruin the mirror!

    What a remarkable $3000 invention!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Wiping a tear of laughter from my eye..... You DSLR fans are a HOOT!!!

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    X-Man, Jul 25, 2007
    #10
  11. jmc

    Savageduck Guest

    X-Man wrote:

    >
    > Wiping a tear of laughter from my eye..... You DSLR fans are a HOOT!!!
    >
    > LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >

    … and you are a great problem solver.

    Some of us have chosen to have the flexibility and lens options the
    DSLR provides us. For the most part dust is not a problem (certainly if
    it is only visible in the view finder.)
    Taking care when changing lenses is the best prevenative.

    Once sensor dust is detected those of us who have the skills will clean
    that low pass filter ourselves or fix images with PS.

    For the most part P&S digitals do a good job within their limitations
    and your demands are probably adequately filled with your dust free P&S.
    I would say your noise problems with high ISO shots due to small sensor
    size, especially with a high MP P&S are a bigger problem than dust will
    ever be to a quality DSLR of any make.

    The OP had a problem and helpful posters tried to help, some did, you
    did not.
     
    Savageduck, Jul 26, 2007
    #11
  12. jmc

    jmc Guest

    Suddenly, without warning, Adrian Boliston exclaimed (7/22/2007 10:41 PM):
    > "jmc" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> Is canned air the best way to clean the innards? It was really hard, even
    >> with my small hands, to clear the dust off of that screen.

    >
    > I get the odd annoying bit of dust on the focussing screen, but have used a
    > small microfibre lens cloth to shift it, but it does not seem to get rid of
    > the very tiny specks, but they don't worry me too much. I usually carry a
    > giotto rocket blower which shifts larger bits of dust before resorting to a
    > cloth. With canned air I would worry about blowing propellant onto the
    > screen, but some canned airs are better than others I understand.
    >
    >


    Good point. I forgot about those little "manual" blowers. I'll drop by
    the photo shop tomorrow and see if they carry them.

    jmc
     
    jmc, Jul 27, 2007
    #12
  13. jmc

    jmc Guest

    Suddenly, without warning, Savageduck exclaimed (7/26/2007 10:16 AM):
    > X-Man wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Wiping a tear of laughter from my eye..... You DSLR fans are a HOOT!!!
    >>
    >> LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >>

    > … and you are a great problem solver.
    >
    > Some of us have chosen to have the flexibility and lens options the
    > DSLR provides us. For the most part dust is not a problem (certainly if
    > it is only visible in the view finder.)
    > Taking care when changing lenses is the best prevenative.
    >
    > Once sensor dust is detected those of us who have the skills will clean
    > that low pass filter ourselves or fix images with PS.
    >
    > For the most part P&S digitals do a good job within their limitations
    > and your demands are probably adequately filled with your dust free P&S.
    > I would say your noise problems with high ISO shots due to small sensor
    > size, especially with a high MP P&S are a bigger problem than dust will
    > ever be to a quality DSLR of any make.
    >
    > The OP had a problem and helpful posters tried to help, some did, you
    > did not.


    Oh, I've heard him diss us DSLR folks before. Haven't quite killfiled
    him yet because he amuses me. I'm only recently a convert to DSLR, had
    P&S cameras for 10 years. I'll never go back, and not being stupid,
    knew going in that dust would be one of those issues one has to deal
    with when you have the flexibility of swapping lenses. Especially here,
    in the desert.

    jmc
     
    jmc, Jul 27, 2007
    #13
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