Dual Booting x86 & x64 XP (long post alert!)

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Colin Nowell, Dec 4, 2005.

  1. Colin Nowell

    Colin Nowell Guest

    Hi all (been away a while...),

    I know it's been discussed to death in here already (the subject) but I
    thought I would just document how I "got there" in the possibility that it
    may simplify it and remove some of the frustrations that I went through
    before finally getting my machine to dual boot to either XP Pro x86 or XP
    Pro x64 the exact way that _I_ wanted it to. Don't be put off by the length
    of this post. It is not indicative of how complicated the whole matter is,
    rather it's just my long winded way of explaining! :)

    My intention, when I originally built this new PC (Gigabyte GA-K8NXP-9 based
    with an AMD x2 4400), was to go "totally" 64bit and stay there no matter
    what. I suppose that was a bit naive of me given the lack of 64bit drivers
    for some things but at least I tried for a while. Anyway, believe it or not,
    just for the lack of being able to run a webcam (another story), I
    capitulated and bought myself another (exact same) SATA HD along with a
    shiny new copy of WinXP Pro SP2 (OEM).

    Having read a lot in here about the agonies, frustrations and general
    "jumping through hoops" it took, to get dual booting going, I decided NOT to
    do the "reinstall everything" scenario using the newest OS (i.e. x64) last.
    Why? Simply because I already had a good rock solid installation of x64
    running in the machine already and didn't want to go through the pain of
    getting back to where I already was with it and frankly, I didn't see why I
    should have to!! Besides, I thought "what the hell, it's only a measily
    boot.ini file to edit isn't it?"

    So, I simply unplugged the x64 HD, plugged in the new HD onto the same port
    and away I went installing x86 XP Pro. However, there were some steps I took
    first with the x64 installation to try and pre-empt the business of drive
    letters getting screwed up by either the BIOS or the OS(s). I simply "moved"
    all the existing populated drives "down" a letter so that it would leave
    space (as a "d" drive) for the alter HD; ready for when I got to the point
    where I could install BOTH drives together. Once the x86 installation was
    established and I had it running the way I wanted it (with webcam working!),
    I did exactly the same to it (still only got the one drive in of course at
    this point). So, now each OS had a "hole" where the other's HD would
    eventually reside. This is a very important point since you always want the
    OS's home partition to become the "c:" drive. Any other way is a pain
    because it screws up EVERY other drive letter on the system...

    Next step was to connect back up the x64 HD but this time to the next socket
    in the SATA chain and switch on. Ok so far and all came up as expected with
    the x64 drive being "d:" in my x86 OS environment. I even set my Outlook
    2003 (in x86) to access the same folders on the x64 drive that its Outlook
    2003 was accessing, thereby maintaining mail sync at a stroke and it worked
    well.

    Ok, at this point (apart from aforesaid Outlook) there was absolutely no
    linkage in terms of dual boot between the two drives. If I simply swapped
    the connectors and rebooted, I could swap between OS's at will and each
    would take the "c:" drives position and all was fine and dandy (that was
    simply because each physical swap made each respective drive the "c:"
    again). That's when the "trawling through here" helped in terms of useful
    info, came in. Next I took the ntdetect.com & ntldr from the x64 install
    (the newest version) and copied and overwrote the two on the x86 install;
    making sure that the x86 copy would still boot ok after I did that (note: do
    NOT change the boot.ini file at this point). It did.

    Last step was that darned boot.ini file!! I trawled the internet reading
    here and there and there were many useful sites and explanations in relation
    to what "multi", "disk", "rdisk" & "partition" actually meant and stood for
    (some are obvious of course) but not once could I get a consistent
    explanation of exactly what "rdisk" meant and how it functioned let alone
    find ANYONE who could tell me just what the "r" stands for in "rdisk"!!

    Anyway, I knew that this was the key part I had to get right for me to be
    able to simply edit the boot.ini file, substitute on the 1st physical drive
    and for it all to work.

    Here's how both boot.ini files looked on each drive...

    x86 on SATA II interface 0
    [boot loader]
    timeout=30
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
    Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=AlwaysOff /usepmtimer

    x64 on SATA II interface 1
    [boot loader]
    timeout=30
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional x64
    Edition" /fastdetect /NoExecute=optin /usepmtimer

    Now, the average person would think "ah, it must be the disk(0) statement I
    have to change to disk(1) in the x64 since it is a second (physical) HD in
    the system but they'd be wrong. At this point, an understanding of how the
    System BIOS handles SATA controllers would be helpful. Obviously this
    applies to my own motherboard but I'm sure others are similar (in my own
    case, I am using the NVidia controller that drives the SATA II sockets). The
    way the BIOS translates what is plugged in and what it tells Windows is
    plugged in, is not quite what you would expect. To cut a long story short,
    it calls the 1st drive in the SATA (II) chain the "Primary ATA controller,
    Disk 0" and the 2nd, "Secondary ATA controller, Disk 1" and this is what it
    "tells" Windows. In other words, it simulates what Windows would expect from
    standard IDE controllers. This is where "rdisk" comes in because that is
    specifically to do with IDE controllers and it's digit can range between 0 &
    3 because a standard twin IDE controller can drive 4 physical disk drives,
    master/slave on each channel. Eventually this is what "tripped me up"
    because I simply combined them like this...

    [boot loader]
    timeout=30
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS

    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
    Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=AlwaysOff /usepmtimer
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(2)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional x64
    Edition" /fastdetect /NoExecute=optin /usepmtimer

    ....and changed the rdisk value to "2" on the assumption that since my second
    drive (with x64 on it) was also master on the second port in the chain, it
    would be 0 & 2 and not 0 & 1 since 0/1 would be pri:master/slave and 2/3
    would be sec:master/slave. Wrong!! (the sockets on my m/b are labelled 0,1,2
    & 3 and I should have realised this) The way the BIOS tells it, if there are
    only two physical drives plugged in on seperate ports, is that they will be
    disk 0 (1st) primary, and disk 1 (2nd) secondary instead of both being
    "primary" (which if you think about it, would confuse windows) so, I changed
    rdisk to "1", and wrote the combined boot.ini file that now looked like
    this...

    [boot loader]
    timeout=30
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS

    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
    Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=AlwaysOff /usepmtimer
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional x64
    Edition" /fastdetect /NoExecute=optin /usepmtimer

    ....to the physical drive that is always disk 0 (which in my case has x86 XP
    on it - but you could do it the other way around...) and voila!, it all
    worked as expected and no re-installing of x64 was involved at all. All that
    happens is that the drive letters swap around depending on which OS is going
    to boot but note that disk 0 is always the source boot drive for both. It's
    just that when booting into x64 on my system, it's disk 0's letter actually
    becomes "d:" (with an inactive x86 XP on it).

    So, at last I am happy, in the end it wasn't painful and hopefully, this
    will help someone facing the same dilemma. It would make me even MORE happy
    if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    for??! ;-)

    Colin
     
    Colin Nowell, Dec 4, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Colin Nowell

    John Barnes Guest

    The reason I always suggest that you use recovery console to rebuild the
    boot.ini especially when there are a number of systems involved.


    "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    news:%23STYieP%...
    > Hi all (been away a while...),
    >
    > I know it's been discussed to death in here already (the subject) but I
    > thought I would just document how I "got there" in the possibility that it
    > may simplify it and remove some of the frustrations that I went through
    > before finally getting my machine to dual boot to either XP Pro x86 or XP
    > Pro x64 the exact way that _I_ wanted it to. Don't be put off by the
    > length of this post. It is not indicative of how complicated the whole
    > matter is, rather it's just my long winded way of explaining! :)
    >
    > My intention, when I originally built this new PC (Gigabyte GA-K8NXP-9
    > based with an AMD x2 4400), was to go "totally" 64bit and stay there no
    > matter what. I suppose that was a bit naive of me given the lack of 64bit
    > drivers for some things but at least I tried for a while. Anyway, believe
    > it or not, just for the lack of being able to run a webcam (another
    > story), I capitulated and bought myself another (exact same) SATA HD along
    > with a shiny new copy of WinXP Pro SP2 (OEM).
    >
    > Having read a lot in here about the agonies, frustrations and general
    > "jumping through hoops" it took, to get dual booting going, I decided NOT
    > to do the "reinstall everything" scenario using the newest OS (i.e. x64)
    > last. Why? Simply because I already had a good rock solid installation of
    > x64 running in the machine already and didn't want to go through the pain
    > of getting back to where I already was with it and frankly, I didn't see
    > why I should have to!! Besides, I thought "what the hell, it's only a
    > measily boot.ini file to edit isn't it?"
    >
    > So, I simply unplugged the x64 HD, plugged in the new HD onto the same
    > port and away I went installing x86 XP Pro. However, there were some steps
    > I took first with the x64 installation to try and pre-empt the business of
    > drive letters getting screwed up by either the BIOS or the OS(s). I simply
    > "moved" all the existing populated drives "down" a letter so that it would
    > leave space (as a "d" drive) for the alter HD; ready for when I got to the
    > point where I could install BOTH drives together. Once the x86
    > installation was established and I had it running the way I wanted it
    > (with webcam working!), I did exactly the same to it (still only got the
    > one drive in of course at this point). So, now each OS had a "hole" where
    > the other's HD would eventually reside. This is a very important point
    > since you always want the OS's home partition to become the "c:" drive.
    > Any other way is a pain because it screws up EVERY other drive letter on
    > the system...
    >
    > Next step was to connect back up the x64 HD but this time to the next
    > socket in the SATA chain and switch on. Ok so far and all came up as
    > expected with the x64 drive being "d:" in my x86 OS environment. I even
    > set my Outlook 2003 (in x86) to access the same folders on the x64 drive
    > that its Outlook 2003 was accessing, thereby maintaining mail sync at a
    > stroke and it worked well.
    >
    > Ok, at this point (apart from aforesaid Outlook) there was absolutely no
    > linkage in terms of dual boot between the two drives. If I simply swapped
    > the connectors and rebooted, I could swap between OS's at will and each
    > would take the "c:" drives position and all was fine and dandy (that was
    > simply because each physical swap made each respective drive the "c:"
    > again). That's when the "trawling through here" helped in terms of useful
    > info, came in. Next I took the ntdetect.com & ntldr from the x64 install
    > (the newest version) and copied and overwrote the two on the x86 install;
    > making sure that the x86 copy would still boot ok after I did that (note:
    > do NOT change the boot.ini file at this point). It did.
    >
    > Last step was that darned boot.ini file!! I trawled the internet reading
    > here and there and there were many useful sites and explanations in
    > relation to what "multi", "disk", "rdisk" & "partition" actually meant and
    > stood for (some are obvious of course) but not once could I get a
    > consistent explanation of exactly what "rdisk" meant and how it functioned
    > let alone find ANYONE who could tell me just what the "r" stands for in
    > "rdisk"!!
    >
    > Anyway, I knew that this was the key part I had to get right for me to be
    > able to simply edit the boot.ini file, substitute on the 1st physical
    > drive and for it all to work.
    >
    > Here's how both boot.ini files looked on each drive...
    >
    > x86 on SATA II interface 0
    > [boot loader]
    > timeout=30
    > default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    > [operating systems]
    > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
    > Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=AlwaysOff /usepmtimer
    >
    > x64 on SATA II interface 1
    > [boot loader]
    > timeout=30
    > default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    > [operating systems]
    > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional x64
    > Edition" /fastdetect /NoExecute=optin /usepmtimer
    >
    > Now, the average person would think "ah, it must be the disk(0) statement
    > I have to change to disk(1) in the x64 since it is a second (physical) HD
    > in the system but they'd be wrong. At this point, an understanding of how
    > the System BIOS handles SATA controllers would be helpful. Obviously this
    > applies to my own motherboard but I'm sure others are similar (in my own
    > case, I am using the NVidia controller that drives the SATA II sockets).
    > The way the BIOS translates what is plugged in and what it tells Windows
    > is plugged in, is not quite what you would expect. To cut a long story
    > short, it calls the 1st drive in the SATA (II) chain the "Primary ATA
    > controller, Disk 0" and the 2nd, "Secondary ATA controller, Disk 1" and
    > this is what it "tells" Windows. In other words, it simulates what Windows
    > would expect from standard IDE controllers. This is where "rdisk" comes in
    > because that is specifically to do with IDE controllers and it's digit can
    > range between 0 & 3 because a standard twin IDE controller can drive 4
    > physical disk drives, master/slave on each channel. Eventually this is
    > what "tripped me up" because I simply combined them like this...
    >
    > [boot loader]
    > timeout=30
    > default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    >
    > [operating systems]
    > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
    > Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=AlwaysOff /usepmtimer
    > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(2)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional x64
    > Edition" /fastdetect /NoExecute=optin /usepmtimer
    >
    > ...and changed the rdisk value to "2" on the assumption that since my
    > second drive (with x64 on it) was also master on the second port in the
    > chain, it would be 0 & 2 and not 0 & 1 since 0/1 would be pri:master/slave
    > and 2/3 would be sec:master/slave. Wrong!! (the sockets on my m/b are
    > labelled 0,1,2 & 3 and I should have realised this) The way the BIOS tells
    > it, if there are only two physical drives plugged in on seperate ports, is
    > that they will be disk 0 (1st) primary, and disk 1 (2nd) secondary instead
    > of both being "primary" (which if you think about it, would confuse
    > windows) so, I changed rdisk to "1", and wrote the combined boot.ini file
    > that now looked like this...
    >
    > [boot loader]
    > timeout=30
    > default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    >
    > [operating systems]
    > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
    > Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=AlwaysOff /usepmtimer
    > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional x64
    > Edition" /fastdetect /NoExecute=optin /usepmtimer
    >
    > ...to the physical drive that is always disk 0 (which in my case has x86
    > XP on it - but you could do it the other way around...) and voila!, it all
    > worked as expected and no re-installing of x64 was involved at all. All
    > that happens is that the drive letters swap around depending on which OS
    > is going to boot but note that disk 0 is always the source boot drive for
    > both. It's just that when booting into x64 on my system, it's disk 0's
    > letter actually becomes "d:" (with an inactive x86 XP on it).
    >
    > So, at last I am happy, in the end it wasn't painful and hopefully, this
    > will help someone facing the same dilemma. It would make me even MORE
    > happy if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY
    > stands for??! ;-)
    >
    > Colin
    >
     
    John Barnes, Dec 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. Michael Jennings, Dec 4, 2005
    #3
  4. Colin Nowell

    Rob Wilkens Guest

    As I remember from taking an MCSE class quite some time ago (yes, i'm MCSE
    certified):

    You use rdisk() to indicate the disk number when you use multi(), but if you
    don't use multi() and instead use scsi() you use disk() instead of rdisk().
    I believe you use multi() whenever you either have a non-scsi disk OR you
    have a scsi disk that has bios support.

    The line will either read
    scsi(#)disk(#)rdisk(0)partition(#)
    or
    multi(#)disk(0)rdisk(#)partition(#)

    Does that help at all?

    -Rob

    "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    news:esjRviQ%...
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102873#XSLTH3262121121120121120120
    > provides a clue - rdisk numbers 0 through 2 on the IDEs.
    > If my post is all you get on your question, let us know what you discover.
    >
    > "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23STYieP%...
    >> if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    >> for??! ;-)
    >>
    >> Colin
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Rob Wilkens, Dec 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Colin Nowell

    Rob Wilkens Guest

    oh, and multi(#) # represents controller #, so multi(0) would be controller
    0, multi(1) would be controller 1..

    -Rob
    "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    news:esjRviQ%...
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102873#XSLTH3262121121120121120120
    > provides a clue - rdisk numbers 0 through 2 on the IDEs.
    > If my post is all you get on your question, let us know what you discover.
    >
    > "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23STYieP%...
    >> if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    >> for??! ;-)
    >>
    >> Colin
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Rob Wilkens, Dec 5, 2005
    #5
  6. Colin Nowell

    Colin Nowell Guest

    I don't think that's correct Michael... Even on that page you referred me
    to, it says...

    x86-Based Computers
    The following are generic examples of two possible BOOT.INI ARC paths:

    multi(X)disk(Y)rdisk(Z)partition(W)\<winnt_dir>

    where X, Y, Z, and W are numbers that identify the item to their left.

    Then lower down in the case of the use of "multi" (which is our IDE case)

    Z is the ordinal for the disk on the adapter and is usually a number between
    0 and 3.

    (not 0 and 2)

    Anyway, my question was about the "r" itself? What does it stand for in
    itself?

    Colin


    "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    news:esjRviQ%...
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102873#XSLTH3262121121120121120120
    > provides a clue - rdisk numbers 0 through 2 on the IDEs.
    > If my post is all you get on your question, let us know what you discover.
    >
    > "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    > news:%23STYieP%...
    >> if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    >> for??! ;-)
    >>
    >> Colin
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Colin Nowell, Dec 5, 2005
    #6
  7. Colin Nowell

    Colin Nowell Guest

    Not really, I now fully understand the functionality of the boot.ini file
    and how it does what it does but I'm just curious about the use of the
    letter "r"? Why not "p" or "q" (which would be equally as meaningless...)

    "Rob Wilkens" <> wrote in message
    news:uHVAEKT%...
    > As I remember from taking an MCSE class quite some time ago (yes, i'm MCSE
    > certified):
    >
    > You use rdisk() to indicate the disk number when you use multi(), but if
    > you don't use multi() and instead use scsi() you use disk() instead of
    > rdisk(). I believe you use multi() whenever you either have a non-scsi
    > disk OR you have a scsi disk that has bios support.
    >
    > The line will either read
    > scsi(#)disk(#)rdisk(0)partition(#)
    > or
    > multi(#)disk(0)rdisk(#)partition(#)
    >
    > Does that help at all?
    >
    > -Rob
    >
    > "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    > news:esjRviQ%...
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102873#XSLTH3262121121120121120120
    >> provides a clue - rdisk numbers 0 through 2 on the IDEs.
    >> If my post is all you get on your question, let us know what you
    >> discover.
    >>
    >> "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%23STYieP%...
    >>> if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    >>> for??! ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Colin
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Colin Nowell, Dec 5, 2005
    #7
  8. Colin Nowell

    Rob Wilkens Guest

    I believe 'r' was real where the other was logical...

    -Rob

    "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Not really, I now fully understand the functionality of the boot.ini file
    > and how it does what it does but I'm just curious about the use of the
    > letter "r"? Why not "p" or "q" (which would be equally as meaningless...)
    >
    > "Rob Wilkens" <> wrote in message
    > news:uHVAEKT%...
    >> As I remember from taking an MCSE class quite some time ago (yes, i'm
    >> MCSE certified):
    >>
    >> You use rdisk() to indicate the disk number when you use multi(), but if
    >> you don't use multi() and instead use scsi() you use disk() instead of
    >> rdisk(). I believe you use multi() whenever you either have a non-scsi
    >> disk OR you have a scsi disk that has bios support.
    >>
    >> The line will either read
    >> scsi(#)disk(#)rdisk(0)partition(#)
    >> or
    >> multi(#)disk(0)rdisk(#)partition(#)
    >>
    >> Does that help at all?
    >>
    >> -Rob
    >>
    >> "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    >> news:esjRviQ%...
    >>> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102873#XSLTH3262121121120121120120
    >>> provides a clue - rdisk numbers 0 through 2 on the IDEs.
    >>> If my post is all you get on your question, let us know what you
    >>> discover.
    >>>
    >>> "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:%23STYieP%...
    >>>> if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    >>>> for??! ;-)
    >>>>
    >>>> Colin
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Rob Wilkens, Dec 5, 2005
    #8
  9. Why can't I AfD this? Rob Wilkens proposed "real" - sounds good.
    A lot better than "repair" - sort of the function of NT's rdisk.exe.
    AfD is the Wikipedia "Articles for Deletion" purification ritual.

    In the #XSLTH3262121121120121120120 section of the page I
    linked to, there was an IDE three disk setup rdisked 0 through 2,
    plus a 4 partition scsi. The (possible) rdisk 3 wasn't in that boot.ini.

    "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message news:...
    >I don't think that's correct Michael... Even on that page you referred me
    > to, it says...
    >
    > x86-Based Computers
    > The following are generic examples of two possible BOOT.INI ARC paths:
    >
    > multi(X)disk(Y)rdisk(Z)partition(W)\<winnt_dir>
    >
    > where X, Y, Z, and W are numbers that identify the item to their left.
    >
    > Then lower down in the case of the use of "multi" (which is our IDE case)
    >
    > Z is the ordinal for the disk on the adapter and is usually a number between
    > 0 and 3.
    >
    > (not 0 and 2)
    >
    > Anyway, my question was about the "r" itself? What does it stand for in
    > itself?
    >
    > Colin
    >
    >
    > "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    > news:esjRviQ%...
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;102873#XSLTH3262121121120121120120
    >> provides a clue - rdisk numbers 0 through 2 on the IDEs.
    >> If my post is all you get on your question, let us know what you discover.
    >>
    >> "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%23STYieP%...
    >>> if someone could tell me what that darned "r" in rdisk ACTUALLY stands
    >>> for??! ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Colin
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Michael Jennings, Dec 5, 2005
    #9
  10. Colin Nowell

    Colin Nowell Guest

    Of course! Why on earth didn't I think of that?! Makes perfect sense
    actually.

    Colin

    "Rob Wilkens" <> wrote in message
    news:%23vqXSmT%...
    >I believe 'r' was real where the other was logical...
    >
    > -Rob
    >
    > "Colin Nowell" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Not really, I now fully understand the functionality of the boot.ini file
    >> and how it does what it does but I'm just curious about the use of the
    >> letter "r"? Why not "p" or "q" (which would be equally as meaningless...)
     
    Colin Nowell, Dec 5, 2005
    #10
  11. Colin Nowell

    Colin Nowell Guest

    I think "r" for real fits perfectly since it actually DOES reflect the
    "real" hardware interface on the SATA output that the x64 OS (in my own
    case) is plugged in to.

    "Michael Jennings" <> wrote in message
    news:e9pgz$W%...
    > Why can't I AfD this? Rob Wilkens proposed "real" - sounds good.
    > A lot better than "repair" - sort of the function of NT's rdisk.exe.
    > AfD is the Wikipedia "Articles for Deletion" purification ritual.
     
    Colin Nowell, Dec 5, 2005
    #11
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