Dual Boot XP Pro and Ubunto 9.04 Diary day two.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Max Burke, Jun 1, 2009.

  1. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    Fixed minor annoyances with install:

    Annoyance: Numlock switched off when Ubunto starts (over riding bios
    setting it on)
    Fixed with numlockx install.

    Installed Firestarter Firewall, new problem, it doesn't appear to be
    turned on automatically when Ubuntu starts, has to be started by user
    after Ubuntu has started and user has logged on.

    I'm on an 'always on' Internet connection with Telstra Clear and I would
    prefer to have the firewall on all the time as well.
    (or is it something I'm missing again)


    Looked for anti-virus to install, consensus seems to be not needed, so
    didn't bother. (ignoring the 'advocacy reasons' and reading up on the
    technical reasons why Linux doesn't need anti virus protection decided
    it for me)

    Learning the ins and outs of installing new apps, etc, using synaptic.

    Learning the ins and outs of the file system (hands on rather than just
    reading/knowing in theory about how it works)

    I currently have a 20GB NTFS partition not being used on an external
    USB2 hard drive that I am thinking of using exclusively for Ubuntu.
    If I delete the NTFS partition do I need to do anything with the free
    space/prepare it to make it available only to Ubuntu?

    When ran the Ubuntu install I didn't bother with creating a swap space
    partition (I just created an 11GB partiton for Ubuntu) and from what
    I've been reading it doesn't matter if there isn't a swap space
    partition if there is enough physical memory (1.3GB on this computer) as
    the swap space partition wouldn't be used much, and I can always set up
    a swap file instead if it's needed.
    Should I set up a swap file?
    At the moment Ubuntu uses about 200 - 300MB leaving 900MB - 1 GB memory
    free according to the system monitor.

    Learning how to set up desktops, screen saver, etc

    Minor problem, F-Spot stalls/crashes when I try to import images from my
    USB external drive used to store photo's. No error messages, it just
    stops working and I have force it to stop.
    Files are standard jpg files, averageing 500KB - 1.5MB in size, but
    there are a lot of them, Over 15,000 in numerous NTFS sub directories.

    F-Spot can open individual files in these directories without any
    problems at all.

    Anyone have any idea why it wont/cant import them?

    I want to use some of my photo's in the F-Stop screen saver using F-Stop
    images but I cant until F-Stop has imported them.

    Another question: Are there/can anyone recommend a desktop background
    image changing programme? (like a windows wallpaper changer)

    Thanks for all the help...

    PS: Why do so many *nix forums use secure connections when you go to them?

    :)

    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
     
    Max Burke, Jun 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. Max Burke

    Enkidu Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    >
    > Installed Firestarter Firewall, new problem, it doesn't appear to be
    > turned on automatically when Ubuntu starts, has to be started by
    > user after Ubuntu has started and user has logged on.
    >
    > I'm on an 'always on' Internet connection with Telstra Clear and I
    > would prefer to have the firewall on all the time as well. (or is it
    > something I'm missing again)
    >

    ----Quote------

    Q: Do I have to start Firestarter after I have rebooted?

    Usually, no. When Firestarter is installed from a package, the firewall
    is running as a service. You can query the status of the service by
    executing /etc/init.d/firestarter status. The excemption to this is
    Gentoo users, dial-up users in some cases and persons who have installed
    from source and not registered the Firestarter sytem service.

    For an in-depth answer, see the section on persistence of the firewall.
    >
    > Learning the ins and outs of the file system (hands on rather than
    > just reading/knowing in theory about how it works)
    >

    I'm not sure what you feel you need to know here.
    >
    > I currently have a 20GB NTFS partition not being used on an external
    > USB2 hard drive that I am thinking of using exclusively for Ubuntu.
    > If I delete the NTFS partition do I need to do anything with the
    > free space/prepare it to make it available only to Ubuntu?
    >

    Hmm, theoretically, use fdisk from the command line to delete the
    partition, recreate it as a linux partition, then format it using
    mkfs.ext3. Look at parted for a GUI solution (you may have to install it
    but it appears in the System->Administration menu).

    But I've not used the GUI. As in all procedures relating to file
    systems, Windows or Linux, be careful and anything you do is your own
    responsibility and you do have a verified backup of the bits you want to
    keep, don't you?
    >
    > When ran the Ubuntu install I didn't bother with creating a swap
    > space partition (I just created an 11GB partiton for Ubuntu) and from
    > what I've been reading it doesn't matter if there isn't a swap space
    > partition if there is enough physical memory (1.3GB on this
    > computer) as the swap space partition wouldn't be used much, and I
    > can always set up a swap file instead if it's needed. Should I set up
    > a swap file? At the moment Ubuntu uses about 200 - 300MB leaving
    > 900MB - 1 GB memory free according to the system monitor.
    >

    Some software insists on swapping (same in Windows) but it is getting
    rarer. 1.3GB is on the small side but you'll probably be OK.
    >
    > Learning how to set up desktops, screen saver, etc
    >
    > Minor problem, F-Spot stalls/crashes when I try to import images from
    > my USB external drive used to store photo's. No error messages, it
    > just stops working and I have force it to stop. Files are standard
    > jpg files, averageing 500KB - 1.5MB in size, but there are a lot of
    > them, Over 15,000 in numerous NTFS sub directories.
    >

    You *may* be running into memory problems. If F-Spot keeps that lot or
    just the directory and metadata in memory, you may be running out. I'd
    add a reasonable swap file and try again.
    >
    > F-Spot can open individual files in these directories without any
    > problems at all.
    >
    > Anyone have any idea why it wont/cant import them?
    >
    > I want to use some of my photo's in the F-Stop screen saver using
    > F-Stop images but I cant until F-Stop has imported them.
    >
    > Another question: Are there/can anyone recommend a desktop background
    > image changing programme? (like a windows wallpaper changer)
    >
    > Thanks for all the help...
    >
    > PS: Why do so many *nix forums use secure connections when you go to
    > them?
    >

    It doesn't cost much and Unix users are generally more aware of security.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Jun 1, 2009
    #2
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  3. Max Burke

    Jack Spratt Guest

    "Enkidu" <> wrote in message
    news:4a23abf9$...
    > Max Burke wrote:


    >> PS: Why do so many *nix forums use secure connections when you go to
    >> them?
    >>

    > It doesn't cost much and Unix users are generally more aware of security.


    In case someone tries to packet sniff their geek speak?



    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff
    >
    > --
    >
    > The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    > the same old personalities show through.
     
    Jack Spratt, Jun 1, 2009
    #3
  4. Max Burke

    AD. Guest

    On Jun 1, 9:40 pm, Max Burke <> wrote:

    I don't really have any experience with firewall GUIs, so I skipped
    that stuff ;)

    > Looked for anti-virus to install, consensus seems to be not needed, so
    > didn't bother. (ignoring the 'advocacy reasons' and reading up on the
    > technical reasons why Linux doesn't need anti virus protection decided
    > it for me)


    You can get AV scanners for Linux, but they are for mail/file servers
    and the virus defs are the same as the Windows scanners.

    While Linux can still get worms, trojans, root kits etc via exploits -
    viruses as a class of problem don't exist apart from a couple of proof
    of concept ones.

    One hurdle for downloadable malware is that any executable file you
    save to your disk doesn't get execute permissions by default. It just
    picks up the default file permissions (eg 644), and you need to
    explicitly make it executable - not very user friendly ;)

    > I currently have a 20GB NTFS partition not being used on an external
    > USB2 hard drive that I am thinking of using exclusively for Ubuntu.
    > If I delete the NTFS partition do I need to do anything with the free
    > space/prepare it to make it available only to Ubuntu?


    Not really. Be aware though that unixy systems make a more obvious
    distinction between a partition and a filesystem that Windows tends
    to. Unless Ubuntus GUI tools handles both at once (I haven't used the
    GUI one), you may need to create the partition (eg fdisk on DOS) and
    then create the filesystem (eg format on DOS)

    >
    > When ran the Ubuntu install I didn't bother with creating a swap space
    > partition (I just created an 11GB partiton for Ubuntu) and from what
    > I've been reading it doesn't matter if there isn't a swap space
    > partition if there is enough physical memory (1.3GB on this computer) as
    > the swap space partition wouldn't be used much, and I can always set up
    > a swap file instead if it's needed.
    > Should I set up a swap file?


    Swap files are supposed to be slower than swap partitions, but you
    might not need either. But if it is hardly ever used, the speed
    difference probably won't matter.

    I think you will need swap space if you ever want to hibernate (I
    don't personally do that though).

    But yeah Linux doesn't tend to use swap until RAM has run out. I have
    to admit frustration (I only have experience with XP and earlier here)
    with the way Windows will page things in and out of memory as they get
    used/unused - even if there is spare RAM.

    > Minor problem, F-Spot stalls/crashes when I try to import images from my
    > USB external drive used to store photo's. No error messages, it just
    > stops working and I have force it to stop.
    > Files are standard jpg files, averageing 500KB - 1.5MB in size, but
    > there are a lot of them, Over 15,000 in numerous NTFS sub directories.


    This could (I'm just guessing) be an issue with the NTFS handling
    code. It is reverse engineered, and won't be as robust as say ext3 on
    Linux or NTFS on Windows would be.

    I can't really suggest anything apart from maybe trying it in smaller
    batches.

    > PS: Why do so many *nix forums use secure connections when you go to them?


    I dunno, but the browser hoop jumping annoys me when they use self
    signed certs.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Jun 1, 2009
    #4
  5. Max Burke

    victor Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    > Fixed minor annoyances with install:
    >
    > Annoyance: Numlock switched off when Ubunto starts (over riding bios
    > setting it on)
    > Fixed with numlockx install.
    >
    > Installed Firestarter Firewall, new problem, it doesn't appear to be
    > turned on automatically when Ubuntu starts, has to be started by user
    > after Ubuntu has started and user has logged on.
    >
    > I'm on an 'always on' Internet connection with Telstra Clear and I would
    > prefer to have the firewall on all the time as well.
    > (or is it something I'm missing again)


    Its firewalled by default anyway, firestarter is really just a
    configurator for iptables in the kernel
    >
    >
    > Looked for anti-virus to install, consensus seems to be not needed, so
    > didn't bother. (ignoring the 'advocacy reasons' and reading up on the
    > technical reasons why Linux doesn't need anti virus protection decided
    > it for me)
    >
    > Learning the ins and outs of installing new apps, etc, using synaptic.
    >
    > Learning the ins and outs of the file system (hands on rather than just
    > reading/knowing in theory about how it works)
    >
    > I currently have a 20GB NTFS partition not being used on an external
    > USB2 hard drive that I am thinking of using exclusively for Ubuntu.
    > If I delete the NTFS partition do I need to do anything with the free
    > space/prepare it to make it available only to Ubuntu?


    You can use the partition manager in your admin tab to unmount and
    delete it, create the partition type of your choice and format it in the
    filesystem of your choice, suggest FAT32, but try it out with NTFS
    before you trash it.
     
    victor, Jun 1, 2009
    #5
  6. Max Burke

    Enkidu Guest

    Jack Spratt wrote:
    > "Enkidu" <> wrote in message
    > news:4a23abf9$...
    >> Max Burke wrote:

    >
    >>> PS: Why do so many *nix forums use secure connections when you go
    >>> to them?
    >>>

    >> It doesn't cost much and Unix users are generally more aware of
    >> security.

    >
    > In case someone tries to packet sniff their geek speak?
    >

    If you wish.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Jun 2, 2009
    #6
  7. Max Burke

    Lodi Guest

    > Max Burke wrote:

    > Fixed minor annoyances with install:
    >
    > Annoyance: Numlock switched off when Ubunto starts (over riding bios
    > setting it on)
    > Fixed with numlockx install.
    >


    Some of this post is a bit redundant but some of it might help you out.

    Typing gconf-editor at the terminal starts the gnome configuration editor.
    (I'm assuming you're using Gnome and not KDE)

    Browsing to desktop/gnome/peripherals/keyboard will give you the "remember
    number lock" option.....or just install numlockx as you did.

    > Installed Firestarter Firewall, new problem, it doesn't appear to be
    > turned on automatically when Ubuntu starts, has to be started by user
    > after Ubuntu has started and user has logged on.
    >
    > I'm on an 'always on' Internet connection with Telstra Clear and I would
    > prefer to have the firewall on all the time as well.
    > (or is it something I'm missing again)
    >

    As far as I'm aware, most firewall front-ends/gui's only need to be running
    when you want to modify iptables, the kernels "built-in firewall".

    If you want to test your firewall, start Firestarter, block http, restart
    your computer and *without starting FireStarter* see if you can get on the
    web. In theory you should get a 404

    >
    > Looked for anti-virus to install, consensus seems to be not needed, so
    > didn't bother. (ignoring the 'advocacy reasons' and reading up on the
    > technical reasons why Linux doesn't need anti virus protection decided
    > it for me)


    Not sure of the difference between an "advocacy" reason and a "technical"
    reason. They are different sides of the same coin. The fact is that because
    of its default security model Linux doesn't have viruses/malware/etc and
    doesn't need anti-virus software.

    The only use for anti-virus software on Linux that I can see is if you're
    running an email server which connects to/from Windows machines.

    >
    > Learning the ins and outs of installing new apps, etc, using synaptic.
    >


    Eventually you're going to need "How to install ANYTHING in Ubuntu"

    http://amitech.50webs.com/installing/index.php.html

    > Learning the ins and outs of the file system (hands on rather than just
    > reading/knowing in theory about how it works)


    Apart from knowledge for the sake of knowledge (which is a fairly good
    reason) there's no obvious benefit in knowing how a filesystems work. Just
    use ext3 with Ubuntu. It's a case of trusting that the devs know what's
    best for us.

    And don't forget that cos ext3 is a journaled file system you can't safely
    delete anything without deleting the journal entry as well. Use ext2 if you
    need to fully wipe individual files from your hard drive.....

    sudo apt-get install wipe && man wipe

    .... will give a short but interesting read on ext2/3 and will also install a
    handy wiping utility (139kb)

    >
    > Another question: Are there/can anyone recommend a desktop background
    > image changing programme? (like a windows wallpaper changer)


    Wallpaper Tray has a good reputation. Haven't used it as it's Gnome.

    sudo apt-get install wallpaper-tray

    After install, right click on the GNOME Panel and select "Add to Panel"
    Find and select "Wallpaper Tray" and press "Add."
    >
    > Thanks for all the help...
    >
    > PS: Why do so many *nix forums use secure connections when you go to them?
    >


    Ubuntu Forums is the best place to post for Ubuntu help. 24 hours a day
    there are twenty or thirty mods plus hundreds of lurkers waiting to help

    http://ubuntuforums.org/forumdisplay.php?f=326

    Regards
    Lodi
    > :)
    >
     
    Lodi, Jun 2, 2009
    #7
  8. Max Burke

    Guest

    On Jun 1, 9:40 pm, Max Burke <> wrote:
    > Fixed minor annoyances with install:
    >
    > Annoyance: Numlock switched off when Ubunto starts (over riding bios
    > setting it on)
    > Fixed with numlockx install.
    >
    > Installed Firestarter Firewall, new problem, it doesn't appear to be
    > turned on automatically when Ubuntu starts, has to be started by user
    > after Ubuntu has started and user has logged on.
    >
    > I'm on an 'always on' Internet connection with Telstra Clear and I would
    > prefer to have the firewall on all the time as well.
    > (or is it something I'm missing again)


    Strange....the start / stop script will be or should be in /etc/init.d

    Different distros do things in different way ie they have their own
    methods to start, restart or stop daemons

    Here is a generic method,

    To get it to start on boot depends on what run level you are at...

    so type who -r

    Its going to say 2, 3 or 5....5 is gui (usually)...

    So to make a service run on boot you sym link it...

    ln -s /etc/init.d/firestarter /etc/rc5.d/S10firestarter

    (assuming run level 5)

    repeat for 2 and 3

    ln -s /etc/init.d/firestarter /etc/rc2.d/S10firestarter
    ln -s /etc/init.d/firestarter /etc/rc3.d/S10firestarter

    > Looked for anti-virus to install, consensus seems to be not needed, so
    > didn't bother. (ignoring the 'advocacy reasons' and reading up on the
    > technical reasons why Linux doesn't need anti virus protection decided
    > it for me)


    There has never been a virus for linux, probably never
    will...."probably"....

    > Learning the ins and outs of installing new apps, etc, using synaptic.
    >
    > Learning the ins and outs of the file system (hands on rather than just
    > reading/knowing in theory about how it works)
    >
    > I currently have a 20GB NTFS partition not being used on an external
    > USB2 hard drive that I am thinking of using exclusively for Ubuntu.
    > If I delete the NTFS partition do I need to do anything with the free
    > space/prepare it to make it available only to Ubuntu?


    Yes format it....

    Do a fdisk -l

    That should show the usb device as /dev/sda1

    If its there then you are good to go, otherwise you need to load a
    module...

    so,

    fdisk /dev/sda

    Once in type p to screen print the partition(s)....

    Then typpe t to change the type to linux (type 83)

    wq to write and exit....now make the file system

    mkfs -t ext3 /dev/sda1

    It can now be mounted...and used......booting off it is a bit
    harder....

    > When ran the Ubuntu install I didn't bother with creating a swap space
    > partition (I just created an 11GB partiton for Ubuntu) and from what
    > I've been reading it doesn't matter if there isn't a swap space
    > partition if there is enough physical memory (1.3GB on this computer) as
    > the swap space partition wouldn't be used much, and I can always set up
    > a swap file instead if it's needed.
    > Should I set up a swap file?


    Not really...depends on how hard the box is punished, as a rule 512meg
    is enough....2gb at max unless the application cals for more (oracle).

    8><---------

    regards

    Thing
     
    , Jun 2, 2009
    #8
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