Dual Boot XP Pro and Ubunto 9.04 Diary day one. [long post]

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Max Burke, May 31, 2009.

  1. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    I decided to have another look at Linux yesterday, to see if it had
    improved over my previous attempts at using it alongside Microsoft Windows.

    Is Ubunto seems to be the most popular versions at the moment, and
    apparently the easiest to use, I went looking on the web for it.
    After reading up about it and seeing how easy it was to download, create
    an ISO CD, and set it up to dual boot with XP Pro, I went looking for a
    copy to download.

    CityLink in Wellington was listed as a mirror site to download V9.04

    The Download didn't start well, and kept stalling, even in Orbit
    download accelerator, and it was going to take more than 30 minutes to
    download the 698 MB file!
    After about 5 minutes and seeing the download speed getting slower and
    slower, I canceled it, and looked for another mirror.

    Ihug was listed as well so I tried it from there. The Download started
    well, and just got better. The download was completed in under 10 minutes.

    Next step was to create/burn the ISO to a bootable CD. That went as
    expected using Nero.

    Then I tried it out, and booted Ubuntu from the CD. It took a while
    start, but thats to be expected running it from a CD.

    It seemed to be working OK and didn't have any issues with hardware.

    I then decided to try setting it up as a Dual boot with XP Pro; Most of
    the websites I had read showed it as a simple, straight forward process
    and that it shouldn't take more that 30-40 minutes.

    The set up, disk re-partitioning to make room for Ubuntu, install, and
    setup of the dual boot went as expected without any dramas and took
    approximately 35 minutes.

    Starting Ubuntu for the first time went fine and XP Pro ran as normal
    from the dual boot menu.

    First problem:
    I have num lock set ON in the bios, and XP doesn't change that.
    Ubunto however turns num lock off, overriding the bios, which is
    annoying when trying to enter your name/password with numbers in them
    and using that number keypad.

    Once Ubuntu was running, the first thing I noticed was that the screen
    was shifted to the right and it could only be corrected by using the On
    screen monitor controls.
    So I had a look at system, Display and Ubuntu hadn't identified my
    graphics card (NVidia GX5200) or the AOC monitor and was using the
    default graphics setup. It wouldn't allow me to change the display
    quality above basic either.
    Finally fixed by allowing Ubuntu to be updated once I had the Internet
    connection working, when it recognised my graphics card.

    Next step was to get connected to the Internet.
    I went to all the right places, followed the instructions, help screens,
    etc; Loaded my static IP address, subnet mask, gateway, etc in all the
    correct places, set my permissions to use the network, etc.
    Restarted Ubuntu/computer. A window pops up saying I'm off line.
    Checked the network icon in the bottom right corner of the screen, and
    right click, enable network solved that problem. Network icon info
    showed network was working.

    Started Firefox, and tried to go on the net.
    Cannot find website! I'm not connected to the Internet!

    Re-checked all my settings several times, static IP address, gateway
    address, etc. All correct.
    Still no Internet connection for Firefox.
    Started up the Network Tools, Ping, Trace, etc says no connection!
    The Network icon in the bottom right still says it network connections
    are working.

    Restarted Ubuntu/Computer, made no difference, still cant connect to the
    internet with Firefox or the network tools!

    Started again from scratch and re-entered everything, made no difference.
    Logged off Ubuntu, logged on to XP, logged on to the internet (so
    nothing wrong with the hardware) and tried Googling for a solution.
    Heaps of forums and lots of answers to others having problems getting
    connected to the Internet none making much sense to me.
    Found one website that had a reasonably easy guide to follow...

    Logged back on to Ubuntu, followed the guide and Ubuntu trouble shooting
    help screens, didn't help at all!
    Still cant connect.
    Tried removing and adding settings again the same as previously, several
    times.
    This time I got an Internet connection in Firefox and with network tools.
    So after 3 hours of trying it finally worked, but I still dont know why
    it didn't work at first, and what I did the final time that was
    different from all the previous attempts at getting it to work.

    So, I'm trying out Firefox and I go to Consumer.org.nz to try a few
    speed tests.
    Web site says I need to update the flash player.
    OK, go to Adobe.com, get the latest flash player for Ubuntu v8.0 or
    greater, and let Firefox try to install it.
    Install appears to be working until 75% complete when it pops up an
    error Dependency error libcurl3 - dependency not satisfiable
    Do a Google search on this error and find it's common in Ubuntu 9.04
    when trying to install a flash player in Firefox.

    Most of the 'solutions' were long and involved command line instructions
    that didn't seem to work for most who tried them.

    So I put that problem aside for the time being and decided see if
    Firefox needed updating.
    Up pops the 'package manager' and tells me there are updates available
    and proceeds to download *72 files totaling 44MB* to update Firefox AND
    apparently the flash player. So I let it do it's thing and at the end
    Firefox tells me that the Flash Player has been updated.
    I go to Consumer.org.nz again and I can now run speed test; I try You
    Tube and Flash player is working there as well...


    Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    like me?

    Not by a long shot. ===> IMO <===



    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, May 31, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Max Burke

    Gib Bogle Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    > I decided to have another look at Linux yesterday, to see if it had
    > improved over my previous attempts at using it alongside Microsoft Windows.
    >
    > Is Ubunto seems to be the most popular versions at the moment, and
    > apparently the easiest to use, I went looking on the web for it.
    > After reading up about it and seeing how easy it was to download, create
    > an ISO CD, and set it up to dual boot with XP Pro, I went looking for a
    > copy to download.
    >
    > CityLink in Wellington was listed as a mirror site to download V9.04
    >
    > The Download didn't start well, and kept stalling, even in Orbit
    > download accelerator, and it was going to take more than 30 minutes to
    > download the 698 MB file!
    > After about 5 minutes and seeing the download speed getting slower and
    > slower, I canceled it, and looked for another mirror.
    >
    > Ihug was listed as well so I tried it from there. The Download started
    > well, and just got better. The download was completed in under 10 minutes.
    >
    > Next step was to create/burn the ISO to a bootable CD. That went as
    > expected using Nero.
    >
    > Then I tried it out, and booted Ubuntu from the CD. It took a while
    > start, but thats to be expected running it from a CD.
    >
    > It seemed to be working OK and didn't have any issues with hardware.
    >
    > I then decided to try setting it up as a Dual boot with XP Pro; Most of
    > the websites I had read showed it as a simple, straight forward process
    > and that it shouldn't take more that 30-40 minutes.
    >
    > The set up, disk re-partitioning to make room for Ubuntu, install, and
    > setup of the dual boot went as expected without any dramas and took
    > approximately 35 minutes.
    >
    > Starting Ubuntu for the first time went fine and XP Pro ran as normal
    > from the dual boot menu.
    >
    > First problem:
    > I have num lock set ON in the bios, and XP doesn't change that.
    > Ubunto however turns num lock off, overriding the bios, which is
    > annoying when trying to enter your name/password with numbers in them
    > and using that number keypad.
    >
    > Once Ubuntu was running, the first thing I noticed was that the screen
    > was shifted to the right and it could only be corrected by using the On
    > screen monitor controls.
    > So I had a look at system, Display and Ubuntu hadn't identified my
    > graphics card (NVidia GX5200) or the AOC monitor and was using the
    > default graphics setup. It wouldn't allow me to change the display
    > quality above basic either.
    > Finally fixed by allowing Ubuntu to be updated once I had the Internet
    > connection working, when it recognised my graphics card.
    >
    > Next step was to get connected to the Internet.
    > I went to all the right places, followed the instructions, help screens,
    > etc; Loaded my static IP address, subnet mask, gateway, etc in all the
    > correct places, set my permissions to use the network, etc.
    > Restarted Ubuntu/computer. A window pops up saying I'm off line.
    > Checked the network icon in the bottom right corner of the screen, and
    > right click, enable network solved that problem. Network icon info
    > showed network was working.
    >
    > Started Firefox, and tried to go on the net.
    > Cannot find website! I'm not connected to the Internet!
    >
    > Re-checked all my settings several times, static IP address, gateway
    > address, etc. All correct.
    > Still no Internet connection for Firefox.
    > Started up the Network Tools, Ping, Trace, etc says no connection!
    > The Network icon in the bottom right still says it network connections
    > are working.
    >
    > Restarted Ubuntu/Computer, made no difference, still cant connect to the
    > internet with Firefox or the network tools!
    >
    > Started again from scratch and re-entered everything, made no difference.
    > Logged off Ubuntu, logged on to XP, logged on to the internet (so
    > nothing wrong with the hardware) and tried Googling for a solution.
    > Heaps of forums and lots of answers to others having problems getting
    > connected to the Internet none making much sense to me.
    > Found one website that had a reasonably easy guide to follow...
    >
    > Logged back on to Ubuntu, followed the guide and Ubuntu trouble shooting
    > help screens, didn't help at all!
    > Still cant connect.
    > Tried removing and adding settings again the same as previously, several
    > times.
    > This time I got an Internet connection in Firefox and with network tools.
    > So after 3 hours of trying it finally worked, but I still dont know why
    > it didn't work at first, and what I did the final time that was
    > different from all the previous attempts at getting it to work.
    >
    > So, I'm trying out Firefox and I go to Consumer.org.nz to try a few
    > speed tests.
    > Web site says I need to update the flash player.
    > OK, go to Adobe.com, get the latest flash player for Ubuntu v8.0 or
    > greater, and let Firefox try to install it.
    > Install appears to be working until 75% complete when it pops up an
    > error Dependency error libcurl3 - dependency not satisfiable
    > Do a Google search on this error and find it's common in Ubuntu 9.04
    > when trying to install a flash player in Firefox.
    >
    > Most of the 'solutions' were long and involved command line instructions
    > that didn't seem to work for most who tried them.
    >
    > So I put that problem aside for the time being and decided see if
    > Firefox needed updating.
    > Up pops the 'package manager' and tells me there are updates available
    > and proceeds to download *72 files totaling 44MB* to update Firefox AND
    > apparently the flash player. So I let it do it's thing and at the end
    > Firefox tells me that the Flash Player has been updated.
    > I go to Consumer.org.nz again and I can now run speed test; I try You
    > Tube and Flash player is working there as well...
    >
    >
    > Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    > It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    > the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    > like me?
    >
    > Not by a long shot. ===> IMO <===
    >
    >
    >


    But it's a great way to pass a rainy day, isn't it? ;-)
    Gib Bogle, May 31, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Max Burke

    AD. Guest

    On May 31, 6:39 pm, Max Burke <> wrote:
    > So, I'm trying out Firefox and I go to Consumer.org.nz to try a few
    > speed tests.
    > Web site says I need to update the flash player.
    > OK, go to Adobe.com, get the latest flash player for Ubuntu v8.0 or
    > greater, and let Firefox try to install it.
    > Install appears to be working until 75% complete when it pops up an
    > error Dependency error libcurl3 - dependency not satisfiable
    > Do a Google search on this error and find it's common in Ubuntu 9.04
    > when trying to install a flash player in Firefox.


    Funny that. 9.04 came with Flash player 10.0 built-in for me.

    > So I put that problem aside for the time being and decided see if
    > Firefox needed updating.
    > Up pops the 'package manager' and tells me there are updates available
    > and proceeds to download *72 files totaling 44MB* to update Firefox AND
    > apparently the flash player. So I let it do it's thing and at the end
    > Firefox tells me that the Flash Player has been updated.
    > I go to Consumer.org.nz again and I can now run speed test; I try You
    > Tube and Flash player is working there as well...


    You really need to use a different mindset - until you know what you
    are doing, just stick to getting stuff via the Ubuntu repositories. It
    will all be automatically be maintained for you, and will all get
    upgraded as part of your next OS upgrade.

    Free upgrades come every 6 months with newer versions of all the apps
    and drivers etc. The upgrade process is a one click task then a
    reboot.

    This is the kind of process an "ordinary user" would prefer. Ordinary
    users don't go lusting after the latest versions of everything, and a
    wait of a few months before upgrading everything in one hit isn't a
    big deal.

    This is the audience Ubuntu is aiming at - although I admit it isn't
    100% yet. Most problems are hardware related though. But when the
    hardware is properly support it all just works like it should.

    > Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    > It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    > the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    > like me?


    To be honest most power users like yourself think of themselves as
    ordinary users, but you're far from it. Ordinary users would have
    similar trouble with installing and maintaining Windows systems. It
    really takes a limited hardware platform like the Mac to make things
    really smooth for the ordinary user.

    If you put yourself in the shoes of someone coming to Windows for the
    very first time - would you really find it that intuitive to install
    and configure drivers and networks etc? Do you ever run into issues
    with buggy drivers?

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., May 31, 2009
    #3
  4. Max Burke

    Minty Guest

    On May 31, 8:59 am, "AD." <> wrote:
    > On May 31, 6:39 pm, Max Burke <> wrote:
    >
    > > So, I'm trying out Firefox and I go to Consumer.org.nz to try a few
    > > speed tests.
    > > Web site says I need to update the flash player.
    > > OK, go to Adobe.com, get the latest flash player for Ubuntu v8.0 or
    > > greater, and let Firefox try to install it.
    > > Install appears to be working until 75% complete when it pops up an
    > > error Dependency error libcurl3 - dependency not satisfiable
    > > Do a Google search on this error and find it's common in Ubuntu 9.04
    > > when trying to install a flash player in Firefox.

    >
    > Funny that. 9.04 came with Flash player 10.0 built-in for me.
    >
    > > So I put that problem aside for the time being and decided see if
    > > Firefox needed updating.
    > > Up pops the 'package manager' and tells me there are updates available
    > > and proceeds to download *72 files totaling 44MB* to update Firefox AND
    > > apparently the flash player. So I let it do it's thing and at the end
    > > Firefox tells me that the Flash Player has been updated.
    > > I go to Consumer.org.nz again and I can now run speed test; I try You
    > > Tube and Flash player is working there as well...

    >
    > You really need to use a different mindset - until you know what you
    > are doing, just stick to getting stuff via the Ubuntu repositories. It
    > will all be automatically be maintained for you, and will all get
    > upgraded as part of your next OS upgrade.
    >
    > Free upgrades come every 6 months with newer versions of all the apps
    > and drivers etc. The upgrade process is a one click task then a
    > reboot.
    >
    > This is the kind of process an "ordinary user" would prefer. Ordinary
    > users don't go lusting after the latest versions of everything, and a
    > wait of a few months before upgrading everything in one hit isn't a
    > big deal.
    >
    > This is the audience Ubuntu is aiming at - although I admit it isn't
    > 100% yet. Most problems are hardware related though. But when the
    > hardware is properly support it all just works like it should.
    >
    > > Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    > > It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    > > the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    > > like me?

    >
    > To be honest most power users like yourself think of themselves as
    > ordinary users, but you're far from it. Ordinary users would have
    > similar trouble with installing and maintaining Windows systems. It
    > really takes a limited hardware platform like the Mac to make things
    > really smooth for the ordinary user.
    >
    > If you put yourself in the shoes of someone coming to Windows for the
    > very first time - would you really find it that intuitive to install
    > and configure drivers and networks etc? Do you ever run into issues
    > with buggy drivers?
    >
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Anton


    Well, I've been using Ubuntu for about one year, had three versions,
    all bloody wonderful and I just can't understand how you are having
    difficulties.

    I'm writing this on an old Acer box that my 11-year-old grandson found
    on the side of the road on a heap of junk that was destined for the
    tip. It was minus the hard drive but had 256MB of RAM and a working
    DVD burner. I'm running live from a CD - no hard drive and no
    installed operating system. I'm running an Ubuntu 9.04 deritive called
    Linux Mint 7 “Gloria” live from off the CD.

    I've just been watching Susan Boyle on YouTube. It comes with all the
    stuff need for playing music, YouTube, and movies off my 500GB
    portable hard drive.

    I have it installed on another machine, dual booting with XP Pro.
    Installed well under half an hour and most stuff was installed by
    default. Could play DVD movies straight away – the stuff to do that
    was there. Try playing a movie staight off from a fresh install of
    Windows. Where to find the codecs?

    The default Mint repositories are well stocked with just about
    anything a slightly above average Joe would ever need – huge.

    Suggest you give Linux Mint 7 a whirl - www.linuxmint.com.

    Oh, and it can read and write to my NTFS Windows partitions and access
    stuff on my portable hard drive. That makes it an essential item to
    have in a Windows rescue toolkit. Stuffed Windows rig, not a problem,
    you can get in and read or resue your data through the live Mint CD.
    Piece off piss to do. Beauty.

    I am more than happy with Mint . . . . and it is all for FREE!

    And this old hunk of junk gets a new life.
    Minty, May 31, 2009
    #4
  5. Max Burke

    AD. Guest

    On Jun 1, 12:50 am, Minty <> wrote:
    > Well, I've been using Ubuntu for about one year, had three versions,
    > all bloody wonderful and I just can't understand how you are having
    > difficulties.


    As someone who has used most versions since it started (and has been
    using Debian for even longer) I like Ubuntu as well. But there can
    still be plenty of issues for new users (hell even for established
    ones).

    If your hardware is supported - great. Generally on a machine that
    isn't bleeding edge and doesn't have any dodgy junk in it or overly
    proprietary components it works great. Then again it isn't like there
    aren't any specific components and drivers that make life tough for
    Windows users either.

    I do think that Ubuntu could be a little more conservative in it
    choice of software though. Apart from some of the core apps they are
    basically tied to whatever is in Debian unstable when GNOME has a new
    release. For new users I would recommend not using a new Ubuntu
    version until a couple of months after release.

    Ubuntu 8.10 (as well as 8.04 and 7.10 to a certain extent) wasn't as
    solid as previous releases were. But after a few months 8.10
    stabilised quite well.

    Then again, Vista was similar (just like earlier Windows versions).
    Early adopters report lots of issues, but it eventually settles down
    and everyone gets on with using it.

    --
    Cheers
    Anton
    AD., May 31, 2009
    #5
  6. Max Burke

    Peter Guest

    Max Burke wrote:
    <snip>
    > Next step was to get connected to the Internet.
    > I went to all the right places, followed the instructions, help screens,
    > etc; Loaded my static IP address, subnet mask, gateway, etc in all the
    > correct places, set my permissions to use the network, etc.


    There is a bug with the NetworkManager in that it doesn't handle static IP
    addresses properly. This bug was there with 8.10 as well.
    It doesn't affect ordinary users, who wouldn't know what an IP address was,
    let along whether they want it dynamic or static. There is a fix for this
    (remove NetworkManager and manually set your IP address in /etc/interfaces
    and DNS in /etc/resolv.conf).
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=964192

    <snip>
    > Most of the 'solutions' were long and involved command line instructions
    > that didn't seem to work for most who tried them.


    I find that using the distro supplied packages works just fine. This means
    mostly using a GUI interface, and the distro keeps track of updates.
    To get a wider selection of codecs, I use the Medibuntu repository ...
    http://www.medibuntu.org/
    Also enable the partners repository in the sources section of the package
    manager.

    You need to be careful when installing stuff other than your distro supplied
    packages, this is certainly not something for ordinary users to play with.

    <snip>
    > Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    > It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    > the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    > like me?
    > Not by a long shot.


    But you're not an ordinary user, Max. You are a Windows power user, very
    knowledgeable in the tricks of using Windows and other Microsoft software to
    the limit. You are just the type of person who has the most difficulty
    moving to Linux, because it is difficult to unlearn what you have learnt for
    Windows. Linux is different, both in the specifics and in the culture /
    community. It is a tough learning curve if you want to understand Linux to
    the depth that you know Windows, but very rewarding (IMO). You might like
    to read this piece, a bit outdated now, but still relevant ...
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    In my experience, ordinary users starting from scratch, find Linux (or Mac)
    no harder to learn than Windows. They all work fine.


    Peter
    Peter, May 31, 2009
    #6
  7. Max Burke

    Lodi Guest

    Lodi, Jun 1, 2009
    #7
  8. Max Burke

    Max Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > Max Burke wrote:
    > <snip>
    >> Next step was to get connected to the Internet.
    >> I went to all the right places, followed the instructions, help screens,
    >> etc; Loaded my static IP address, subnet mask, gateway, etc in all the
    >> correct places, set my permissions to use the network, etc.

    >
    > There is a bug with the NetworkManager in that it doesn't handle static IP
    > addresses properly. This bug was there with 8.10 as well.
    > It doesn't affect ordinary users, who wouldn't know what an IP address was,
    > let along whether they want it dynamic or static. There is a fix for this
    > (remove NetworkManager and manually set your IP address in /etc/interfaces
    > and DNS in /etc/resolv.conf).
    > http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=964192


    > <snip>


    >> Most of the 'solutions' were long and involved command line instructions
    >> that didn't seem to work for most who tried them.


    Got it working eventually, but dont have any idea how.

    > I find that using the distro supplied packages works just fine. This means
    > mostly using a GUI interface, and the distro keeps track of updates.
    > To get a wider selection of codecs, I use the Medibuntu repository ...
    > http://www.medibuntu.org/
    > Also enable the partners repository in the sources section of the package
    > manager.
    > You need to be careful when installing stuff other than your distro supplied
    > packages, this is certainly not something for ordinary users to play with.


    > <snip>
    >> Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    >> It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    >> the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    >> like me?
    >> Not by a long shot.


    > But you're not an ordinary user, Max. You are a Windows power user, very
    > knowledgeable in the tricks of using Windows and other Microsoft software to
    > the limit. You are just the type of person who has the most difficulty
    > moving to Linux, because it is difficult to unlearn what you have learnt for
    > Windows. Linux is different, both in the specifics and in the culture /
    > community. It is a tough learning curve if you want to understand Linux to
    > the depth that you know Windows, but very rewarding (IMO). You might like
    > to read this piece, a bit outdated now, but still relevant ...
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html


    Next step in the learning process:
    Getting my brain around the file system; Biggest problem so far? I have
    to keep telling myself it's NOT NTFS or FAT...

    ;-)






    > In my experience, ordinary users starting from scratch, find Linux (or Mac)
    > no harder to learn than Windows. They all work fine.


    > Peter
    >
    >
    Max, Jun 1, 2009
    #8
  9. Max Burke

    victor Guest

    Max wrote:

    >
    > Next step in the learning process:
    > Getting my brain around the file system; Biggest problem so far? I have
    > to keep telling myself it's NOT NTFS or FAT...
    >
    > ;-)
    >

    Your biggest problem might be getting over a Linux VS Windows mindset.
    victor, Jun 1, 2009
    #9
  10. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    > victor wrote:
    > Max wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Next step in the learning process:
    >> Getting my brain around the file system; Biggest problem so far? I
    >> have to keep telling myself it's NOT NTFS or FAT...
    >>
    >> ;-)
    >>

    > Your biggest problem might be getting over a Linux VS Windows mindset.


    Not my mindset.

    Others might assume I'm jumping ship, switching, dumping Microsoft...
    They'd be wrong.

    It's a learning exercise, and practice for later in the year when I get
    a new computer to run Windows 7.

    I'm planning to have a dual boot XP/Windows 7 setup on the new computer,
    and maybe even Ubuntu...

    I'm planning to turn this current computer into a file server for XP,
    Windows 7, and maybe Ubuntu (Linux) and get rid of some of the 5
    external hard drives connected to this computer


    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Jun 1, 2009
    #10
  11. Max Burke

    Palooka Guest

    Oly wrote:
    > On Sun, 31 May 2009 18:39:46 +1200, Max Burke
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> I decided to have another look at Linux yesterday, to see if it had
    >> improved over my previous attempts at using it alongside Microsoft Windows.
    >>
    >> Is Ubunto seems to be the most popular versions at the moment, and
    >> apparently the easiest to use, I went looking on the web for it.
    >> After reading up about it and seeing how easy it was to download, create
    >> an ISO CD, and set it up to dual boot with XP Pro, I went looking for a
    >> copy to download.
    >>
    >> CityLink in Wellington was listed as a mirror site to download V9.04
    >>
    >> The Download didn't start well, and kept stalling, even in Orbit
    >> download accelerator, and it was going to take more than 30 minutes to
    >> download the 698 MB file!
    >> After about 5 minutes and seeing the download speed getting slower and
    >> slower, I canceled it, and looked for another mirror.
    >>
    >> Ihug was listed as well so I tried it from there. The Download started
    >> well, and just got better. The download was completed in under 10 minutes.
    >>
    >> Next step was to create/burn the ISO to a bootable CD. That went as
    >> expected using Nero.
    >>
    >> Then I tried it out, and booted Ubuntu from the CD. It took a while
    >> start, but thats to be expected running it from a CD.
    >>
    >> It seemed to be working OK and didn't have any issues with hardware.
    >>
    >> I then decided to try setting it up as a Dual boot with XP Pro; Most of
    >> the websites I had read showed it as a simple, straight forward process
    >> and that it shouldn't take more that 30-40 minutes.
    >>
    >> The set up, disk re-partitioning to make room for Ubuntu, install, and
    >> setup of the dual boot went as expected without any dramas and took
    >> approximately 35 minutes.
    >>
    >> Starting Ubuntu for the first time went fine and XP Pro ran as normal
    >>from the dual boot menu.
    >> First problem:
    >> I have num lock set ON in the bios, and XP doesn't change that.
    >> Ubunto however turns num lock off, overriding the bios, which is
    >> annoying when trying to enter your name/password with numbers in them
    >> and using that number keypad.
    >>
    >> Once Ubuntu was running, the first thing I noticed was that the screen
    >> was shifted to the right and it could only be corrected by using the On
    >> screen monitor controls.
    >> So I had a look at system, Display and Ubuntu hadn't identified my
    >> graphics card (NVidia GX5200) or the AOC monitor and was using the
    >> default graphics setup. It wouldn't allow me to change the display
    >> quality above basic either.
    >> Finally fixed by allowing Ubuntu to be updated once I had the Internet
    >> connection working, when it recognised my graphics card.
    >>
    >> Next step was to get connected to the Internet.
    >> I went to all the right places, followed the instructions, help screens,
    >> etc; Loaded my static IP address, subnet mask, gateway, etc in all the
    >> correct places, set my permissions to use the network, etc.
    >> Restarted Ubuntu/computer. A window pops up saying I'm off line.
    >> Checked the network icon in the bottom right corner of the screen, and
    >> right click, enable network solved that problem. Network icon info
    >> showed network was working.
    >>
    >> Started Firefox, and tried to go on the net.
    >> Cannot find website! I'm not connected to the Internet!
    >>
    >> Re-checked all my settings several times, static IP address, gateway
    >> address, etc. All correct.
    >> Still no Internet connection for Firefox.
    >> Started up the Network Tools, Ping, Trace, etc says no connection!
    >> The Network icon in the bottom right still says it network connections
    >> are working.
    >>
    >> Restarted Ubuntu/Computer, made no difference, still cant connect to the
    >> internet with Firefox or the network tools!
    >>
    >> Started again from scratch and re-entered everything, made no difference.
    >> Logged off Ubuntu, logged on to XP, logged on to the internet (so
    >> nothing wrong with the hardware) and tried Googling for a solution.
    >> Heaps of forums and lots of answers to others having problems getting
    >> connected to the Internet none making much sense to me.
    >> Found one website that had a reasonably easy guide to follow...
    >>
    >> Logged back on to Ubuntu, followed the guide and Ubuntu trouble shooting
    >> help screens, didn't help at all!
    >> Still cant connect.
    >> Tried removing and adding settings again the same as previously, several
    >> times.
    >> This time I got an Internet connection in Firefox and with network tools.
    >> So after 3 hours of trying it finally worked, but I still dont know why
    >> it didn't work at first, and what I did the final time that was
    >> different from all the previous attempts at getting it to work.
    >>
    >> So, I'm trying out Firefox and I go to Consumer.org.nz to try a few
    >> speed tests.
    >> Web site says I need to update the flash player.
    >> OK, go to Adobe.com, get the latest flash player for Ubuntu v8.0 or
    >> greater, and let Firefox try to install it.
    >> Install appears to be working until 75% complete when it pops up an
    >> error Dependency error libcurl3 - dependency not satisfiable
    >> Do a Google search on this error and find it's common in Ubuntu 9.04
    >> when trying to install a flash player in Firefox.
    >>
    >> Most of the 'solutions' were long and involved command line instructions
    >> that didn't seem to work for most who tried them.
    >>
    >> So I put that problem aside for the time being and decided see if
    >> Firefox needed updating.
    >> Up pops the 'package manager' and tells me there are updates available
    >> and proceeds to download *72 files totaling 44MB* to update Firefox AND
    >> apparently the flash player. So I let it do it's thing and at the end
    >> Firefox tells me that the Flash Player has been updated.
    >> I go to Consumer.org.nz again and I can now run speed test; I try You
    >> Tube and Flash player is working there as well...
    >>
    >>
    >> Conclusions after the first day of using Ubuntu:
    >> It's going to be interesting learning how to use it, but is it ready for
    >> the ordinary user, or as a replacement for Windows for the ordinary user
    >> like me?
    >>
    >> Not by a long shot. ===> IMO <===

    >
    > I reckon you'd get a bigger audience and intelligent response if you
    > posted your problems to a dedicated Ubuntu group such as
    > alt.os.linux.ubuntu They're a pretty keen lot in there.
    >

    They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.

    Palooka
    Palooka, Jun 2, 2009
    #11
  12. Max Burke

    Lodi Guest

    > Palooka wrote:

    >> Oly wrote:


    >> I reckon you'd get a bigger audience and intelligent response if you
    >> posted your problems to a dedicated Ubuntu group such as
    >> alt.os.linux.ubuntu They're a pretty keen lot in there.
    >>

    > They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.
    >
    > Palooka


    Can I throw in the obligatory ubuntuforums link...

    http://ubuntuforums.org/forumdisplay.php?f=326

    The definitive site for ubuntu help

    Regards
    Lodi
    Lodi, Jun 2, 2009
    #12
  13. Max Burke

    Moog Guest

    Palooka illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:

    <snip>
    > They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.


    Not only that, but step by step "noob" experiences with an alien
    operating system are ten a penny.

    Without trying to sound blunt, we've read all this kind of shat
    before. And those that haven't can find hundreds, nay thousands of
    reports by eager bloggers. Most of them extremely well written (sorry
    OP, yours wasn't).

    Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    is not for that.

    Help with a probem. Yes. That's exactly what this group does. Let us
    know what the problem is and we'll assist to the best of our
    abilities.

    HTH.

    --
    So Batman came up to me & he hit me over the head with a vase & he went
    T'PAU! I said "Don't you mean KAPOW?? He said "No, I've got china in my
    hand.
    Moog, Jun 2, 2009
    #13
  14. "Moog" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Palooka illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >
    > <snip>
    >> They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.

    >
    > Not only that, but step by step "noob" experiences with an alien
    > operating system are ten a penny.
    >
    > Without trying to sound blunt, we've read all this kind of shat
    > before. And those that haven't can find hundreds, nay thousands of
    > reports by eager bloggers. Most of them extremely well written (sorry
    > OP, yours wasn't).
    >
    > Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    > is not for that.
    >
    > Help with a probem. Yes. That's exactly what this group does. Let us
    > know what the problem is and we'll assist to the best of our
    > abilities.
    >

    That's a lie. The only thing you fools do is bitch and complain because
    Linsux f*cked up your computer
    ScoobyDoobyDo, Jun 2, 2009
    #14
  15. Max Burke

    Moog Guest

    ScoobyDoobyDo illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >
    >
    > "Moog" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Palooka illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>> They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.

    >>
    >> Not only that, but step by step "noob" experiences with an alien
    >> operating system are ten a penny.
    >>
    >> Without trying to sound blunt, we've read all this kind of shat
    >> before. And those that haven't can find hundreds, nay thousands of
    >> reports by eager bloggers. Most of them extremely well written (sorry
    >> OP, yours wasn't).
    >>
    >> Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    >> is not for that.
    >>
    >> Help with a probem. Yes. That's exactly what this group does. Let us
    >> know what the problem is and we'll assist to the best of our
    >> abilities.
    >>

    > That's a lie. The only thing you fools do is bitch and complain because
    > Linsux f*cked up your computer


    No. That's what you nameshifting trolls do. This is because you are
    too dim to install an OS by yourself and rely on it being
    "pre-installed". You are such a computing heavyweight, eh?

    Anyway. Your latest ludicrous incarnation has now been despatched into
    my cess pit of trolling Windows apologists.

    Enjoy it there.

    --
    So Batman came up to me & he hit me over the head with a vase & he went
    T'PAU! I said "Don't you mean KAPOW?? He said "No, I've got china in my
    hand.
    Moog, Jun 2, 2009
    #15
  16. Max Burke

    victor Guest

    Moog wrote:
    > Palooka illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >
    > <snip>
    >> They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.

    >
    > Not only that, but step by step "noob" experiences with an alien
    > operating system are ten a penny.
    >
    > Without trying to sound blunt, we've read all this kind of shat
    > before. And those that haven't can find hundreds, nay thousands of
    > reports by eager bloggers. Most of them extremely well written (sorry
    > OP, yours wasn't).
    >
    > Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    > is not for that.
    >
    > Help with a probem. Yes. That's exactly what this group does. Let us
    > know what the problem is and we'll assist to the best of our
    > abilities.
    >
    > HTH.
    >


    Clever trolling Max
    victor, Jun 2, 2009
    #16
  17. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    victor wrote:
    > Moog wrote:
    >> Palooka illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>> They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.

    >>
    >> Not only that, but step by step "noob" experiences with an alien
    >> operating system are ten a penny.
    >>
    >> Without trying to sound blunt, we've read all this kind of shat
    >> before. And those that haven't can find hundreds, nay thousands of
    >> reports by eager bloggers. Most of them extremely well written (sorry
    >> OP, yours wasn't).
    >>
    >> Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    >> is not for that.
    >>
    >> Help with a probem. Yes. That's exactly what this group does. Let us
    >> know what the problem is and we'll assist to the best of our
    >> abilities.
    >>
    >> HTH.
    >>

    >
    > Clever trolling Max


    Not me.

    Check the message headers.

    I'm on a fixed IP if you're wondering...

    Some (presumably) *nix idiot of an advocate cross posted my posts into
    alt.os.linux.ubuntu as well and the claimed I had been whining in that
    news group. I haven't I haven't even visited it, read, let alone posted
    anything in it.

    Post's like this from so called *nix supporters are the main reason why
    I dont use *nix... It's just not worth the trouble when so many *nix
    users treat requests for help using *nix like they do.

    Why are so many *nix users *rse***les?

    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Jun 2, 2009
    #17
  18. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    > Moog wrote:
    > Palooka illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:


    > <snip>
    >> They are indeed, but they are getting a bit fed up with OP's Wining.


    > Not only that, but step by step "noob" experiences with an alien
    > operating system are ten a penny.


    > Without trying to sound blunt, we've read all this kind of shat
    > before. And those that haven't can find hundreds, nay thousands of
    > reports by eager bloggers. Most of them extremely well written (sorry
    > OP, yours wasn't).


    > Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    > is not for that.


    What nz.comp isn't for those sorts of posts?
    Why not?

    And when were you appointed moderator of nz.comp?

    > Help with a probem. Yes. That's exactly what this group does. Let us
    > know what the problem is and we'll assist to the best of our
    > abilities.


    > HTH.



    It doesn't.
    It would seem that new *nix users can only post what you approve of and
    only ask questions about using *nix that you think should be asked.

    Thankfully there are some in nz.comp that have been willing to help, and
    have provided me with answers to the minor problems I have had with
    installing and using Ubuntu...

    Then there are the *nix idiots like you and Palooka who make so many
    potential *nix users give up any idea of using *nix because of your
    arsehole attitudes...


    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Jun 2, 2009
    #18
  19. Max Burke

    Lodi Guest

    > Max Burke wrote:

    >> Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    >> is not for that.

    >
    > What nz.comp isn't for those sorts of posts?
    > Why not?
    >
    >
    > It doesn't.
    > It would seem that new *nix users can only post what you approve of and
    > only ask questions about using *nix that you think should be asked.
    >


    Hello Max...Not a very friendly post is what I thought too. I'd steer clear
    of usenet when looking for Ubuntu help. Stick to UbuntuForums.

    > Thankfully there are some in nz.comp that have been willing to help, and
    > have provided me with answers to the minor problems I have had with
    > installing and using Ubuntu...
    >


    Really curious about that sentence. Are you saying that in getting an
    unfamiliar operating system up and running from scratch you only
    encountered *minor* problems. Sounds like an extremely user-friendly
    operating system more than ready for the general public :) Or you're a
    computer wizard.

    I was a bit of a Windows power user when I first started Ubuntu but it took
    me ages to get my head around the "permissions" thing, the "root v user"
    thing, the "everything is a file" thing, the "kernel" thing, the "no
    extensions needed" thing, the "command line" thing etc.....

    Regards
    Lodi
    Lodi, Jun 3, 2009
    #19
  20. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    > Lodi wrote:
    >> Max Burke wrote:


    >>> Comment on someone experiencing an install of Ubuntu? No. This group
    >>> is not for that.

    >> What nz.comp isn't for those sorts of posts?
    >> Why not?


    >> It doesn't.
    >> It would seem that new *nix users can only post what you approve of and
    >> only ask questions about using *nix that you think should be asked.


    > Hello Max...Not a very friendly post is what I thought too. I'd steer clear
    > of usenet when looking for Ubuntu help. Stick to UbuntuForums.


    I have been. I rarely look for advice in usenet with the exception of
    nz.comp and the GRC forums.

    >> Thankfully there are some in nz.comp that have been willing to help, and
    >> have provided me with answers to the minor problems I have had with
    >> installing and using Ubuntu...


    > Really curious about that sentence. Are you saying that in getting an
    > unfamiliar operating system up and running from scratch you only
    > encountered *minor* problems. Sounds like an extremely user-friendly
    > operating system more than ready for the general public :) Or you're a
    > computer wizard.


    It is user friendly, and most of the minor problems I have been having
    is due to my inexperience (not knowing how to do what I want to do)
    rather than something wrong with Ubuntu, and mostly trying to get out of
    my windows user mindset.

    > I was a bit of a Windows power user when I first started Ubuntu but it took
    > me ages to get my head around the "permissions" thing, the "root v user"
    > thing, the "everything is a file" thing, the "kernel" thing, the "no
    > extensions needed" thing, the "command line" thing etc.....


    Exactly....

    --

    Replace the obvious with paradise.net to email me
    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Jun 3, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Max Burke
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    381
  2. Max Burke
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    583
    Pseudo
    Jun 16, 2009
  3. Max

    Ubuntu Diary day ??

    Max, Jun 28, 2009, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    380
  4. Hugh Sutherland

    dual boot or not to dual boot

    Hugh Sutherland, Jan 20, 2010, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    467
    Mike Easter
    Jan 20, 2010
  5. Hugh Sutherland

    to dual boot or not to dual boot

    Hugh Sutherland, Jan 20, 2010, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    416
    thanatoid
    Jan 21, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page