Dual Boot Vista 64 and 32

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by David F, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. David F

    David F Guest

    I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's VPN.

    I've read:
    http://apcmag.com/5485/dualbooting_vista_and_xp

    Which discusses making a Vista 32 which is installed first dual boot with XP
    installed second. I assume a similar procedure would be followed for a dual
    boot Vista 32 and 64 install. Am I correct?

    Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32 and
    Vista 64?
    TIA
    David F, Dec 5, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Because they are the same version, both Vista 32 and 64 bit are
    interchangeable, it doesn't matter which one you install first, just make
    sure they are installed on separate drives or partitions. As for
    transferring applications between the two, its possiblem but not reliable
    especially since both are still architectually different. You will probably
    receive that registry setting errors or the application is not installed
    correctly.

    But if you do install say Microsoft Word on Vista x64, you could try running
    it from Vista x86 but browsing to the Program files (x86) /Microsoft Office
    folder on the Vista x64 partition and launch the winword executable. Again,
    not recommended.
    --
    Andre
    Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >VPN.
    >
    > I've read:
    > http://apcmag.com/5485/dualbooting_vista_and_xp
    >
    > Which discusses making a Vista 32 which is installed first dual boot with
    > XP installed second. I assume a similar procedure would be followed for a
    > dual boot Vista 32 and 64 install. Am I correct?
    >
    > Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    > and Vista 64?
    > TIA
    Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin], Dec 5, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Dual booting is certainly doable. It's not actually as hard as that link.
    Since they're both the same rev, you don't need to do anything special. Just
    be sure to install them on separate partitions. Also, let's be completely
    clear. You need TWO copies of Vista to do this. You can't use one copy for
    both under the licensing MS uses.

    On applications? No, they will each need to be separately installed for each
    version of Windows. And, depending on the licensing, you again may need two
    copies.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >VPN.
    >
    > I've read:
    > http://apcmag.com/5485/dualbooting_vista_and_xp
    >
    > Which discusses making a Vista 32 which is installed first dual boot with
    > XP installed second. I assume a similar procedure would be followed for a
    > dual boot Vista 32 and 64 install. Am I correct?
    >
    > Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    > and Vista 64?
    > TIA
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Dec 5, 2007
    #3
  4. David F

    philo Guest

    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    > backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's

    VPN.
    >
    > I've read:
    > http://apcmag.com/5485/dualbooting_vista_and_xp
    >
    > Which discusses making a Vista 32 which is installed first dual boot with

    XP
    > installed second. I assume a similar procedure would be followed for a

    dual
    > boot Vista 32 and 64 install. Am I correct?
    >
    > Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32

    and
    > Vista 64?
    > TIA
    >



    Instal each OS on a *seperate* partition.

    as far as your data goes...
    it does not matter which OS created it...a word document is a word document!
    philo, Dec 5, 2007
    #4
  5. David F

    David F Guest

    Thanks for the quick, detailed reply. I only want to be able to use
    application documents (e.g. Word 2007 *.doc) on both 32 and 64. I would
    install separate applications in both versions. That would work, correct?

    "Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Because they are the same version, both Vista 32 and 64 bit are
    > interchangeable, it doesn't matter which one you install first, just make
    > sure they are installed on separate drives or partitions. As for
    > transferring applications between the two, its possiblem but not reliable
    > especially since both are still architectually different. You will
    > probably receive that registry setting errors or the application is not
    > installed correctly.
    >
    > But if you do install say Microsoft Word on Vista x64, you could try
    > running it from Vista x86 but browsing to the Program files (x86)
    > /Microsoft Office folder on the Vista x64 partition and launch the winword
    > executable. Again, not recommended.
    > --
    > Andre
    > Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    > My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    > http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    > "David F" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >>backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >>VPN.
    >>
    >> I've read:
    >> http://apcmag.com/5485/dualbooting_vista_and_xp
    >>
    >> Which discusses making a Vista 32 which is installed first dual boot with
    >> XP installed second. I assume a similar procedure would be followed for
    >> a dual boot Vista 32 and 64 install. Am I correct?
    >>
    >> Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    >> and Vista 64?
    >> TIA

    >
    >
    David F, Dec 5, 2007
    #5
  6. David F

    philo Guest

    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the quick, detailed reply. I only want to be able to use
    > application documents (e.g. Word 2007 *.doc) on both 32 and 64. I would
    > install separate applications in both versions. That would work, correct?
    >



    That would work...but if you are just going to be using Microsoft Word...
    you hardly need a 64 bit OS to do that...
    I'd reserve Vista_64 for heavy apps that can take advantage of 64bit
    extensions
    philo, Dec 5, 2007
    #6
  7. That would be a sure way to do it, however, if you are going to install your
    existing copy of Microsoft Office 2007 on both installations, you will need
    to have a license for both operating systems.
    --
    Andre
    Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the quick, detailed reply. I only want to be able to use
    > application documents (e.g. Word 2007 *.doc) on both 32 and 64. I would
    > install separate applications in both versions. That would work, correct?
    >
    > "Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Because they are the same version, both Vista 32 and 64 bit are
    >> interchangeable, it doesn't matter which one you install first, just make
    >> sure they are installed on separate drives or partitions. As for
    >> transferring applications between the two, its possiblem but not reliable
    >> especially since both are still architectually different. You will
    >> probably receive that registry setting errors or the application is not
    >> installed correctly.
    >>
    >> But if you do install say Microsoft Word on Vista x64, you could try
    >> running it from Vista x86 but browsing to the Program files (x86)
    >> /Microsoft Office folder on the Vista x64 partition and launch the
    >> winword executable. Again, not recommended.
    >> --
    >> Andre
    >> Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    >> My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    >> http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    >> "David F" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >>>backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >>>VPN.
    >>>
    >>> I've read:
    >>> http://apcmag.com/5485/dualbooting_vista_and_xp
    >>>
    >>> Which discusses making a Vista 32 which is installed first dual boot
    >>> with XP installed second. I assume a similar procedure would be
    >>> followed for a dual boot Vista 32 and 64 install. Am I correct?
    >>>
    >>> Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    >>> and Vista 64?
    >>> TIA

    >>
    >>

    >
    Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin], Dec 5, 2007
    #7
  8. "David F" <> wrote...
    >I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >VPN.
    > Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    > and Vista 64?


    Hi David,

    Not sure about the dual-boot thing, but ... be aware that you wil need to
    purchase TWO Vista licences if you want to run both 32-bit and 64 bit Vista.

    If you buy Vista in the retail pack, both 32-bit and 64 bit are included.
    But to activate them both on the same machine, you will need two activation
    keys. Yep, even on the same hardware! If you activate your 32-bit Vista,
    then try to activate your 64-bit Vista with the same key (or vice versa),
    you will get an error that the activation key is already in use.

    Also, I would strongly recommend using a virtual machine tool, such as
    Virtual PC or VMWare, instead of dual booting. Virtual PC is a free download
    from Microsoft:

    Virtual PC 2007
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx

    I have run a VPN client from within a Virtual PC machine, it worked fine. By
    using a VM, you can have your 32-bit and 64-bit versions running
    side-by-side, alt-tabbing between them, sharing files etc in real-time;
    instead of needing to shut down and reboot, to switch between versions.
    Install 64-bit Vista on the physical hardware, then install Virtual PC, then
    create a new VM ("virtual machine") in VPC, then install 32-bit Vista into
    the VM.

    Other folks may be able to help you with the dual boot scenario, if you
    really want to go that way. Personally, I have long since given up on
    dual-booting, it is too much hassle and too error-prone. Whereas VMs "just
    work". Main proviso is you'll want 2GB of RAM, or more, to support a VM.

    Application data files (such as Word 2007 docs) work exactly the same on
    32-bit and 64-bit Windows. Even on 64-bit Vista, Word runs as a 32-bit
    application (there's no 64-bit version of Office).

    Hope it helps,
    --
    Andrew McLaren
    amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    Andrew McLaren, Dec 5, 2007
    #8
  9. David F

    David F Guest

    Hi Andrew,
    I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support all
    hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a possibility?
    I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to install some
    hardware for something....

    "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "David F" <> wrote...
    >>I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >>backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >>VPN.
    >> Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    >> and Vista 64?

    >
    > Hi David,
    >
    > Not sure about the dual-boot thing, but ... be aware that you wil need to
    > purchase TWO Vista licences if you want to run both 32-bit and 64 bit
    > Vista.
    >
    > If you buy Vista in the retail pack, both 32-bit and 64 bit are included.
    > But to activate them both on the same machine, you will need two
    > activation keys. Yep, even on the same hardware! If you activate your
    > 32-bit Vista, then try to activate your 64-bit Vista with the same key (or
    > vice versa), you will get an error that the activation key is already in
    > use.
    >
    > Also, I would strongly recommend using a virtual machine tool, such as
    > Virtual PC or VMWare, instead of dual booting. Virtual PC is a free
    > download from Microsoft:
    >
    > Virtual PC 2007
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx
    >
    > I have run a VPN client from within a Virtual PC machine, it worked fine.
    > By using a VM, you can have your 32-bit and 64-bit versions running
    > side-by-side, alt-tabbing between them, sharing files etc in real-time;
    > instead of needing to shut down and reboot, to switch between versions.
    > Install 64-bit Vista on the physical hardware, then install Virtual PC,
    > then create a new VM ("virtual machine") in VPC, then install 32-bit Vista
    > into the VM.
    >
    > Other folks may be able to help you with the dual boot scenario, if you
    > really want to go that way. Personally, I have long since given up on
    > dual-booting, it is too much hassle and too error-prone. Whereas VMs "just
    > work". Main proviso is you'll want 2GB of RAM, or more, to support a VM.
    >
    > Application data files (such as Word 2007 docs) work exactly the same on
    > 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. Even on 64-bit Vista, Word runs as a 32-bit
    > application (there's no 64-bit version of Office).
    >
    > Hope it helps,
    > --
    > Andrew McLaren
    > amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >
    David F, Dec 5, 2007
    #9
  10. If you want to run Vista x64 in a Virtual Machine, the best recommendation
    is VMWare Workstation which supports USB 2.0 devices.
    --
    Andre
    Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Andrew,
    > I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    > compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support
    > all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a
    > possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to
    > install some hardware for something....
    >
    > "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>>I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >>>backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >>>VPN.
    >>> Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista 32
    >>> and Vista 64?

    >>
    >> Hi David,
    >>
    >> Not sure about the dual-boot thing, but ... be aware that you wil need to
    >> purchase TWO Vista licences if you want to run both 32-bit and 64 bit
    >> Vista.
    >>
    >> If you buy Vista in the retail pack, both 32-bit and 64 bit are included.
    >> But to activate them both on the same machine, you will need two
    >> activation keys. Yep, even on the same hardware! If you activate your
    >> 32-bit Vista, then try to activate your 64-bit Vista with the same key
    >> (or vice versa), you will get an error that the activation key is already
    >> in use.
    >>
    >> Also, I would strongly recommend using a virtual machine tool, such as
    >> Virtual PC or VMWare, instead of dual booting. Virtual PC is a free
    >> download from Microsoft:
    >>
    >> Virtual PC 2007
    >>
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx
    >>
    >> I have run a VPN client from within a Virtual PC machine, it worked fine.
    >> By using a VM, you can have your 32-bit and 64-bit versions running
    >> side-by-side, alt-tabbing between them, sharing files etc in real-time;
    >> instead of needing to shut down and reboot, to switch between versions.
    >> Install 64-bit Vista on the physical hardware, then install Virtual PC,
    >> then create a new VM ("virtual machine") in VPC, then install 32-bit
    >> Vista into the VM.
    >>
    >> Other folks may be able to help you with the dual boot scenario, if you
    >> really want to go that way. Personally, I have long since given up on
    >> dual-booting, it is too much hassle and too error-prone. Whereas VMs
    >> "just work". Main proviso is you'll want 2GB of RAM, or more, to support
    >> a VM.
    >>
    >> Application data files (such as Word 2007 docs) work exactly the same on
    >> 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. Even on 64-bit Vista, Word runs as a 32-bit
    >> application (there's no 64-bit version of Office).
    >>
    >> Hope it helps,
    >> --
    >> Andrew McLaren
    >> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>

    >
    Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin], Dec 5, 2007
    #10
  11. "David F" <> wrote...
    > I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    > compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support
    > all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a
    > possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to
    > install some hardware for something....


    If you need USB ports in the VM, then as Andre correctly notes, you would
    need to use VMWare.

    Virtual PC and VMWare can both run as 32-bit or 64-bit hosts (applications);
    ie, you can run 64-bit VMWare, or 64-bit Virtual PC, on 64-bit Windows.
    VMWare allows you to have 64-bit guests, but only if you have a 64-bit CPU
    in the host machine - you can't run a 64-bit guest on a 32-bit host. Virtual
    PC only allows 32-bit guests. In my experience, whether you use VMWare or
    Virtual PC, you'd want to have a 32-bit guest running on top of a 64-bit
    host, that gives best performance all round.

    I use both Virtual PC and VMware Workstation, they are both good products.
    VMWare has some useful extra features, but then you need to pay for it.

    If the hardware device is a USB Smartcard Reader, you can work around
    Virtual PC's lack of USB support by attaching your smartcard to the host
    machine, then opening a Remote Desktop session to the guest. In the Remote
    Desktop client (mstsc.exe), select the option to share the smartcard in the
    Remote Desktop session. Your smartcard is then available inside the guest
    when you RDP into it, even though you don't have a USB port (clear as mud?
    :)

    --
    Andrew McLaren
    amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    Andrew McLaren, Dec 5, 2007
    #11
  12. David F

    David F Guest

    Actually, I can set it up so that I'm running 32 bit Vista as a virtual
    machine, my question is just that will there be some sort of hardware
    support problem if there is not a driver I need for Vista 64, the host and I
    need to run it in Vista 32 guest which may not have hardware support because
    it is a virtual machine?

    Also, isn't there a significant performance hit for running a virtual
    machine even with 4 GB RAM in a 64 bit host?


    "Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > If you want to run Vista x64 in a Virtual Machine, the best recommendation
    > is VMWare Workstation which supports USB 2.0 devices.
    > --
    > Andre
    > Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    > My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    > http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    > "David F" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi Andrew,
    >> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support
    >> all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a
    >> possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to
    >> install some hardware for something....
    >>
    >> "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>>>I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >>>>backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >>>>VPN.
    >>>> Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista
    >>>> 32 and Vista 64?
    >>>
    >>> Hi David,
    >>>
    >>> Not sure about the dual-boot thing, but ... be aware that you wil need
    >>> to purchase TWO Vista licences if you want to run both 32-bit and 64 bit
    >>> Vista.
    >>>
    >>> If you buy Vista in the retail pack, both 32-bit and 64 bit are
    >>> included. But to activate them both on the same machine, you will need
    >>> two activation keys. Yep, even on the same hardware! If you activate
    >>> your 32-bit Vista, then try to activate your 64-bit Vista with the same
    >>> key (or vice versa), you will get an error that the activation key is
    >>> already in use.
    >>>
    >>> Also, I would strongly recommend using a virtual machine tool, such as
    >>> Virtual PC or VMWare, instead of dual booting. Virtual PC is a free
    >>> download from Microsoft:
    >>>
    >>> Virtual PC 2007
    >>>
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx
    >>>
    >>> I have run a VPN client from within a Virtual PC machine, it worked
    >>> fine. By using a VM, you can have your 32-bit and 64-bit versions
    >>> running side-by-side, alt-tabbing between them, sharing files etc in
    >>> real-time; instead of needing to shut down and reboot, to switch between
    >>> versions. Install 64-bit Vista on the physical hardware, then install
    >>> Virtual PC, then create a new VM ("virtual machine") in VPC, then
    >>> install 32-bit Vista into the VM.
    >>>
    >>> Other folks may be able to help you with the dual boot scenario, if you
    >>> really want to go that way. Personally, I have long since given up on
    >>> dual-booting, it is too much hassle and too error-prone. Whereas VMs
    >>> "just work". Main proviso is you'll want 2GB of RAM, or more, to support
    >>> a VM.
    >>>
    >>> Application data files (such as Word 2007 docs) work exactly the same on
    >>> 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. Even on 64-bit Vista, Word runs as a 32-bit
    >>> application (there's no 64-bit version of Office).
    >>>
    >>> Hope it helps,
    >>> --
    >>> Andrew McLaren
    >>> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >
    David F, Dec 6, 2007
    #12
  13. If you are running Vista x86 or x64 in a Virtual Machine, its not really for
    performance purposes but more for convenience sake. Whether its to use a
    particular application or device thats not compatible yet. As for device
    driver issues, you just have to do the research first to find out if your
    devices and applications are supported.

    I have never assigned a Virtual Machine with 4 GBs of RAM simply because I
    don't have that much in my systems and I don't usually assign no more than 1
    GB to 1.5 GB. I am still confused about what you really want to do. Is there
    a specific purpose you need to have access to both platforms?
    --
    Andre
    Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Actually, I can set it up so that I'm running 32 bit Vista as a virtual
    > machine, my question is just that will there be some sort of hardware
    > support problem if there is not a driver I need for Vista 64, the host and
    > I need to run it in Vista 32 guest which may not have hardware support
    > because it is a virtual machine?
    >
    > Also, isn't there a significant performance hit for running a virtual
    > machine even with 4 GB RAM in a 64 bit host?
    >
    >
    > "Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> If you want to run Vista x64 in a Virtual Machine, the best
    >> recommendation is VMWare Workstation which supports USB 2.0 devices.
    >> --
    >> Andre
    >> Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    >> My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    >> http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    >> "David F" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi Andrew,
    >>> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >>> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support
    >>> all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a
    >>> possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to
    >>> install some hardware for something....
    >>>
    >>> "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>>>>I would like to dual boot Vista 64 with Vista 32 which I will use as a
    >>>>>backup for compatibility problems with Vista 64 such as running Cisco's
    >>>>>VPN.
    >>>>> Also, are the files (such as MS Word 2007) transferable between Vista
    >>>>> 32 and Vista 64?
    >>>>
    >>>> Hi David,
    >>>>
    >>>> Not sure about the dual-boot thing, but ... be aware that you wil need
    >>>> to purchase TWO Vista licences if you want to run both 32-bit and 64
    >>>> bit Vista.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you buy Vista in the retail pack, both 32-bit and 64 bit are
    >>>> included. But to activate them both on the same machine, you will need
    >>>> two activation keys. Yep, even on the same hardware! If you activate
    >>>> your 32-bit Vista, then try to activate your 64-bit Vista with the same
    >>>> key (or vice versa), you will get an error that the activation key is
    >>>> already in use.
    >>>>
    >>>> Also, I would strongly recommend using a virtual machine tool, such as
    >>>> Virtual PC or VMWare, instead of dual booting. Virtual PC is a free
    >>>> download from Microsoft:
    >>>>
    >>>> Virtual PC 2007
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/virtualpc/default.mspx
    >>>>
    >>>> I have run a VPN client from within a Virtual PC machine, it worked
    >>>> fine. By using a VM, you can have your 32-bit and 64-bit versions
    >>>> running side-by-side, alt-tabbing between them, sharing files etc in
    >>>> real-time; instead of needing to shut down and reboot, to switch
    >>>> between versions. Install 64-bit Vista on the physical hardware, then
    >>>> install Virtual PC, then create a new VM ("virtual machine") in VPC,
    >>>> then install 32-bit Vista into the VM.
    >>>>
    >>>> Other folks may be able to help you with the dual boot scenario, if you
    >>>> really want to go that way. Personally, I have long since given up on
    >>>> dual-booting, it is too much hassle and too error-prone. Whereas VMs
    >>>> "just work". Main proviso is you'll want 2GB of RAM, or more, to
    >>>> support a VM.
    >>>>
    >>>> Application data files (such as Word 2007 docs) work exactly the same
    >>>> on 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. Even on 64-bit Vista, Word runs as a
    >>>> 32-bit application (there's no 64-bit version of Office).
    >>>>
    >>>> Hope it helps,
    >>>> --
    >>>> Andrew McLaren
    >>>> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin], Dec 6, 2007
    #13
  14. David F

    David F Guest

    Thanks for the great suggestions...is there a FAQ somewhere that addresses
    these questions? I once saw a VPC FAQ, but it didn't seem to address my
    questions...

    One thing I'm thinking about is that I have a PCMCIA EVDO Rev A. AC 595
    Verizon Broadband Aircard. I can run this in the 64 bit host environment,
    but I would also need it when running the Cicso VPN client which runs only
    in 32 bit mode in what would be the guest. Would the PCMCIA Aircard work
    with the 32 bit guest or is there a way to make a pass through to the host
    as in the USB method you suggested? TIA


    "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "David F" <> wrote...
    >> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support
    >> all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a
    >> possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to
    >> install some hardware for something....

    >
    > If you need USB ports in the VM, then as Andre correctly notes, you would
    > need to use VMWare.
    >
    > Virtual PC and VMWare can both run as 32-bit or 64-bit hosts
    > (applications); ie, you can run 64-bit VMWare, or 64-bit Virtual PC, on
    > 64-bit Windows. VMWare allows you to have 64-bit guests, but only if you
    > have a 64-bit CPU in the host machine - you can't run a 64-bit guest on a
    > 32-bit host. Virtual PC only allows 32-bit guests. In my experience,
    > whether you use VMWare or Virtual PC, you'd want to have a 32-bit guest
    > running on top of a 64-bit host, that gives best performance all round.
    >
    > I use both Virtual PC and VMware Workstation, they are both good products.
    > VMWare has some useful extra features, but then you need to pay for it.
    >
    > If the hardware device is a USB Smartcard Reader, you can work around
    > Virtual PC's lack of USB support by attaching your smartcard to the host
    > machine, then opening a Remote Desktop session to the guest. In the Remote
    > Desktop client (mstsc.exe), select the option to share the smartcard in
    > the Remote Desktop session. Your smartcard is then available inside the
    > guest when you RDP into it, even though you don't have a USB port (clear
    > as mud? :)
    >
    > --
    > Andrew McLaren
    > amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >
    David F, Dec 6, 2007
    #14
  15. David F

    David F Guest

    I had forgotten that there are USB Verizon Broadband modems so I could use
    that. Still will my PCMCIA solution work?

    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the great suggestions...is there a FAQ somewhere that addresses
    > these questions? I once saw a VPC FAQ, but it didn't seem to address my
    > questions...
    >
    > One thing I'm thinking about is that I have a PCMCIA EVDO Rev A. AC 595
    > Verizon Broadband Aircard. I can run this in the 64 bit host environment,
    > but I would also need it when running the Cicso VPN client which runs only
    > in 32 bit mode in what would be the guest. Would the PCMCIA Aircard work
    > with the 32 bit guest or is there a way to make a pass through to the host
    > as in the USB method you suggested? TIA
    >
    >
    > "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >>> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not support
    >>> all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is this a
    >>> possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I want to
    >>> install some hardware for something....

    >>
    >> If you need USB ports in the VM, then as Andre correctly notes, you would
    >> need to use VMWare.
    >>
    >> Virtual PC and VMWare can both run as 32-bit or 64-bit hosts
    >> (applications); ie, you can run 64-bit VMWare, or 64-bit Virtual PC, on
    >> 64-bit Windows. VMWare allows you to have 64-bit guests, but only if you
    >> have a 64-bit CPU in the host machine - you can't run a 64-bit guest on a
    >> 32-bit host. Virtual PC only allows 32-bit guests. In my experience,
    >> whether you use VMWare or Virtual PC, you'd want to have a 32-bit guest
    >> running on top of a 64-bit host, that gives best performance all round.
    >>
    >> I use both Virtual PC and VMware Workstation, they are both good
    >> products. VMWare has some useful extra features, but then you need to pay
    >> for it.
    >>
    >> If the hardware device is a USB Smartcard Reader, you can work around
    >> Virtual PC's lack of USB support by attaching your smartcard to the host
    >> machine, then opening a Remote Desktop session to the guest. In the
    >> Remote Desktop client (mstsc.exe), select the option to share the
    >> smartcard in the Remote Desktop session. Your smartcard is then available
    >> inside the guest when you RDP into it, even though you don't have a USB
    >> port (clear as mud? :)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Andrew McLaren
    >> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>

    >
    David F, Dec 6, 2007
    #15
  16. Check with the manufacturer about compatibility with either Vista x86 or
    x64.
    --
    Andre
    Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
    My Vista Quickstart Guide:
    http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!E8E5CC039D51E3DB!9709.entry
    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I had forgotten that there are USB Verizon Broadband modems so I could use
    >that. Still will my PCMCIA solution work?
    >
    > "David F" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thanks for the great suggestions...is there a FAQ somewhere that
    >> addresses these questions? I once saw a VPC FAQ, but it didn't seem to
    >> address my questions...
    >>
    >> One thing I'm thinking about is that I have a PCMCIA EVDO Rev A. AC 595
    >> Verizon Broadband Aircard. I can run this in the 64 bit host
    >> environment, but I would also need it when running the Cicso VPN client
    >> which runs only in 32 bit mode in what would be the guest. Would the
    >> PCMCIA Aircard work with the 32 bit guest or is there a way to make a
    >> pass through to the host as in the USB method you suggested? TIA
    >>
    >>
    >> "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>>> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >>>> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not
    >>>> support all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is
    >>>> this a possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I
    >>>> want to install some hardware for something....
    >>>
    >>> If you need USB ports in the VM, then as Andre correctly notes, you
    >>> would need to use VMWare.
    >>>
    >>> Virtual PC and VMWare can both run as 32-bit or 64-bit hosts
    >>> (applications); ie, you can run 64-bit VMWare, or 64-bit Virtual PC, on
    >>> 64-bit Windows. VMWare allows you to have 64-bit guests, but only if you
    >>> have a 64-bit CPU in the host machine - you can't run a 64-bit guest on
    >>> a 32-bit host. Virtual PC only allows 32-bit guests. In my experience,
    >>> whether you use VMWare or Virtual PC, you'd want to have a 32-bit guest
    >>> running on top of a 64-bit host, that gives best performance all round.
    >>>
    >>> I use both Virtual PC and VMware Workstation, they are both good
    >>> products. VMWare has some useful extra features, but then you need to
    >>> pay for it.
    >>>
    >>> If the hardware device is a USB Smartcard Reader, you can work around
    >>> Virtual PC's lack of USB support by attaching your smartcard to the host
    >>> machine, then opening a Remote Desktop session to the guest. In the
    >>> Remote Desktop client (mstsc.exe), select the option to share the
    >>> smartcard in the Remote Desktop session. Your smartcard is then
    >>> available inside the guest when you RDP into it, even though you don't
    >>> have a USB port (clear as mud? :)
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Andrew McLaren
    >>> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>>

    >>

    >
    Andre Da Costa [ActiveWin], Dec 6, 2007
    #16
  17. David F

    John Barnes Guest

    There seems to be very little driver support for 64-bit USB devices, so
    check it out carefully. In addition to what Charlie said, you can share
    files between separately installed copies of those programs that need to be
    installed on both system (most, but not all)

    "David F" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I had forgotten that there are USB Verizon Broadband modems so I could use
    >that. Still will my PCMCIA solution work?
    >
    > "David F" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thanks for the great suggestions...is there a FAQ somewhere that
    >> addresses these questions? I once saw a VPC FAQ, but it didn't seem to
    >> address my questions...
    >>
    >> One thing I'm thinking about is that I have a PCMCIA EVDO Rev A. AC 595
    >> Verizon Broadband Aircard. I can run this in the 64 bit host
    >> environment, but I would also need it when running the Cicso VPN client
    >> which runs only in 32 bit mode in what would be the guest. Would the
    >> PCMCIA Aircard work with the 32 bit guest or is there a way to make a
    >> pass through to the host as in the USB method you suggested? TIA
    >>
    >>
    >> "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>>> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >>>> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not
    >>>> support all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is
    >>>> this a possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I
    >>>> want to install some hardware for something....
    >>>
    >>> If you need USB ports in the VM, then as Andre correctly notes, you
    >>> would need to use VMWare.
    >>>
    >>> Virtual PC and VMWare can both run as 32-bit or 64-bit hosts
    >>> (applications); ie, you can run 64-bit VMWare, or 64-bit Virtual PC, on
    >>> 64-bit Windows. VMWare allows you to have 64-bit guests, but only if you
    >>> have a 64-bit CPU in the host machine - you can't run a 64-bit guest on
    >>> a 32-bit host. Virtual PC only allows 32-bit guests. In my experience,
    >>> whether you use VMWare or Virtual PC, you'd want to have a 32-bit guest
    >>> running on top of a 64-bit host, that gives best performance all round.
    >>>
    >>> I use both Virtual PC and VMware Workstation, they are both good
    >>> products. VMWare has some useful extra features, but then you need to
    >>> pay for it.
    >>>
    >>> If the hardware device is a USB Smartcard Reader, you can work around
    >>> Virtual PC's lack of USB support by attaching your smartcard to the host
    >>> machine, then opening a Remote Desktop session to the guest. In the
    >>> Remote Desktop client (mstsc.exe), select the option to share the
    >>> smartcard in the Remote Desktop session. Your smartcard is then
    >>> available inside the guest when you RDP into it, even though you don't
    >>> have a USB port (clear as mud? :)
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Andrew McLaren
    >>> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>>

    >>

    >
    John Barnes, Dec 6, 2007
    #17
  18. David F

    David F Guest

    Both the Verizon PCMCIA Broadband card which I own and the various USB
    solutions are supported in both the 32 and 64 bit Vista. The question I
    have is can I run the PCMCIA from a 32 bit guest while using the Cisco VPN
    which will only run on Vista 32 and not Vista 64? TIA Is there some sort
    of FAQ that covers these issues?

    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:uq$...
    > There seems to be very little driver support for 64-bit USB devices, so
    > check it out carefully. In addition to what Charlie said, you can share
    > files between separately installed copies of those programs that need to
    > be installed on both system (most, but not all)
    >
    > "David F" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I had forgotten that there are USB Verizon Broadband modems so I could use
    >>that. Still will my PCMCIA solution work?
    >>
    >> "David F" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Thanks for the great suggestions...is there a FAQ somewhere that
    >>> addresses these questions? I once saw a VPC FAQ, but it didn't seem to
    >>> address my questions...
    >>>
    >>> One thing I'm thinking about is that I have a PCMCIA EVDO Rev A. AC 595
    >>> Verizon Broadband Aircard. I can run this in the 64 bit host
    >>> environment, but I would also need it when running the Cicso VPN client
    >>> which runs only in 32 bit mode in what would be the guest. Would the
    >>> PCMCIA Aircard work with the 32 bit guest or is there a way to make a
    >>> pass through to the host as in the USB method you suggested? TIA
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Andrew McLaren" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> "David F" <> wrote...
    >>>>> I'd like to go the VPC route but I'm a bit worried about hardware not
    >>>>> compatible with 64 bit mode and thanks to the VPC which does not
    >>>>> support all hardware (e.g. USB) unable to access it with 32 bit. Is
    >>>>> this a possibility? I travel a lot and might have a situation where I
    >>>>> want to install some hardware for something....
    >>>>
    >>>> If you need USB ports in the VM, then as Andre correctly notes, you
    >>>> would need to use VMWare.
    >>>>
    >>>> Virtual PC and VMWare can both run as 32-bit or 64-bit hosts
    >>>> (applications); ie, you can run 64-bit VMWare, or 64-bit Virtual PC, on
    >>>> 64-bit Windows. VMWare allows you to have 64-bit guests, but only if
    >>>> you have a 64-bit CPU in the host machine - you can't run a 64-bit
    >>>> guest on a 32-bit host. Virtual PC only allows 32-bit guests. In my
    >>>> experience, whether you use VMWare or Virtual PC, you'd want to have a
    >>>> 32-bit guest running on top of a 64-bit host, that gives best
    >>>> performance all round.
    >>>>
    >>>> I use both Virtual PC and VMware Workstation, they are both good
    >>>> products. VMWare has some useful extra features, but then you need to
    >>>> pay for it.
    >>>>
    >>>> If the hardware device is a USB Smartcard Reader, you can work around
    >>>> Virtual PC's lack of USB support by attaching your smartcard to the
    >>>> host machine, then opening a Remote Desktop session to the guest. In
    >>>> the Remote Desktop client (mstsc.exe), select the option to share the
    >>>> smartcard in the Remote Desktop session. Your smartcard is then
    >>>> available inside the guest when you RDP into it, even though you don't
    >>>> have a USB port (clear as mud? :)
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Andrew McLaren
    >>>> amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    David F, Dec 6, 2007
    #18
  19. David F

    Stefan Pendl Guest

    On Thu, 6 Dec 2007 15:49:30 -0500, "David F"
    <> wrote:

    >Both the Verizon PCMCIA Broadband card which I own and the various USB
    >solutions are supported in both the 32 and 64 bit Vista. The question I
    >have is can I run the PCMCIA from a 32 bit guest while using the Cisco VPN
    >which will only run on Vista 32 and not Vista 64? TIA Is there some sort
    >of FAQ that covers these issues?
    >


    Install VPC and check if hardware virtualization is available, that
    seems to be the only way to know.
    I just installed VPC today and the guest host was running after an
    hour.

    ---
    Stefan Pendl
    Stefan Pendl, Dec 6, 2007
    #19
  20. "David F" <> wrote...
    > Thanks for the great suggestions...is there a FAQ somewhere that addresses
    > these questions? I once saw a VPC FAQ, but it didn't seem to address my
    > questions...


    There probably is, but I don't know off top of my head. Ben Armstrong's blog
    has a wealth of useful information about Virtual PC:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/Virtual_PC_Guy/

    (Ben is one of the lead program managers for virtualisation at Microsoft).

    > One thing I'm thinking about is that I have a PCMCIA EVDO Rev A. AC 595
    > Verizon Broadband Aircard. I can run this in the 64 bit host environment,
    > but I would also need it when running the Cicso VPN client which runs only
    > in 32 bit mode in what would be the guest. Would the PCMCIA Aircard work
    > with the 32 bit guest or is there a way to make a pass through to the host
    > as in the USB method you suggested? TIA


    That would be okay. The underlying physical network connection is provided
    by the host OS. Inside the guest, you'll see a virtualised DEC 21140 Network
    Card. This communicates using the host's network stack; so, you don't need
    to install drivers for the the host card inside the guest.

    My main reservation at this point is, you're setting yourself up for a bit
    of complexity but not much explicit benfit. If you really need to run 32-bit
    apps and drivers, stick with 32-bit Vista. What is your motivation for going
    to 64-bit? FWIW, I run 64-bit Vista on my main desktop (and 32-bit on my
    laptop); but then, I'm happy to live on the bleeding edge :) Unless you
    are running truly demanding applications which are themselves 64-bit apps,
    there isn't much advantage to 64-bit Windows - especially if you have tools
    which require 32-bit Windows.

    --
    Andrew McLaren
    amclar (at) optusnet dot com dot au
    Andrew McLaren, Dec 7, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

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